Neuralink: We Got a Monkey to Play Pong Using Only Its Mind
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A monkey playing pong on the computer while sucking a smoothie out of a straw in front of a forest backdrop

By Alyse Stanley, Gizmodo

Neuralink, the secretive neuroscience startup co-founded by Elon Musk, has been even more quiet than usual these days. That is, until this week when it released a YouTube video of a monkey appearing to play the classic video game Pong with its mind.

The video stars Pager, a 9-year-old macaque monkey who had a Neuralink implanted in either side of his brain roughly six weeks prior, according to the narrator. And apparently, he loves Pong. Before he learned how to play the game with his mind, though, researchers first conditioned him to use a joystick, rewarding him with “a tasty banana smoothie” through a straw whenever he moved an on-screen cursor to certain lit-up squares on a grid.

While he was maneuvering the joystick and happily slurping up his smoothie, the Neuralink devices in his brain recorded his brain activity, monitoring more than 2,000 electrodes implanted in the region of Pager’s motor cortex that controls hand and arm movements. Researchers could also interface with the devices in real-time by pairing their phones via Bluetooth.

That Neuralink data was then fed into a “decoder algorithm” to train it to predict Pager’s intended hand movements in real-time based on which neurons were firing. Following a short calibration period, the decoder understood Pager’s neural patterns well enough that the joystick was no longer needed. The narrator says that even with it disconnected, Pager continues to move the cursor around using only his mind. He then appears to play a game of so-called MindPong with no joystick insight.

“A monkey is literally playing a video game telepathically using a brain chip!!” Musk said in a tweet sharing the video Thursday.

More than four million people have watched it since then, and it’s currently among the top 10 trending videos on YouTube. If you’re interested, Neuralink also shared a video showing what the raw data behind Pager’s neural activity looks like while he’s busy playing.

Musk went on to discuss future plans for Neuralink’s devices in a series of tweets, echoing the video’s narrator that the ultimate goal for this technology is to enable people with paralysis to operate their computer or phone via their mind.

The initial versions of the device “will enable someone with paralysis to use a smartphone with their mind faster than someone using thumbs,” Musk wrote. “Later versions will be able to shunt signals from Neuralinks in brain to Neuralinks in body motor/sensory neuron clusters, thus enabling, for example, paraplegics to walk again.”

Back in August, Neuralink showed a live demo of the Neuralink implant in action, though on pigs rather than monkeys.

“It’s like a Fitbit in your skull with tiny wires,” Musk said at the time.

Click here to read the full article on Gizmodo.

Debris from Chinese rocket re-enters Earth’s atmosphere over Indian Ocean
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A Long March-5B Y2 rocket carrying the core module of China's space station, Tianhe, blasts off from the Wenchang Spacecraft Launch Site on April 29, 2021, in Wenchang, Hainan Province of China.

BY SOPHIE LEWIS, CBS News.

A huge piece of space junk made an uncontrolled re-entry back into Earth’s atmosphere Saturday night. The remnants of a Chinese rocket re-entered the atmosphere and crashed into the Indian Ocean north of Maldives, according to the 18th Space Control Squadron.

According to the U.S. Space Force, the remnants re-entered the atmosphere at 10:15 p.m. ET over the Arabian Peninsula. It was unknown if the debris impacted land or water.

China’s space agency said the rocket re-entered the atmosphere at 10:24 p.m. ET, but also pinpointed the landing area just north of the Maldives. The Chinese space agency said most of the rocket was destroyed during re-entry.

After the incident, NASA slammed China for “failing to meet responsible standards” for the re-entry of space debris.

“Spacefaring nations must minimize the risks to people and property on Earth of re-entries of space objects and maximize transparency regarding those operations,” NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said in a statement Saturday night. “It is critical that China and all spacefaring nations and commercial entities act responsibly and transparently in space to ensure the safety, stability, security, and long-term sustainability of outer space activities.”

The remnants were left over from China’s first module for its new Tianhe space station. The 23-ton Chinese rocket Long March-5B recently launched the first module for the country’s new space station into orbit. After the core separated from the rest of the rocket, it should have followed a predetermined flight path into the ocean.

Click here to read the full article on CBS News.

Immediate Lessons From Colonial Pipeline: What Companies Should be Considering
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internet security and data protection concept, cybersecurity

As you know, companies all over the world looking at the Colonial Pipeline attack. Robert Cattanach is a partner at the international law firm Dorsey & Whitney. He has previously worked as a trial attorney for the United States Department of Justice and was also special counsel to the Secretary of the Navy.

Today he is an expert on cybersecurity and data breaches, privacy and telecommunications, and international regulatory compliance. He says there are some immediate lessons companies should learn from the attack and some things they should considering right now.

“The full extent of the damage to Colonial Pipeline, and its business partners, will not be known for weeks if not months. The breadth and duration of the impact of the ransomware provides important lessons to us all,” Cattanach says.

“Make sure you have an incident response plan, and practice it. This needs to include stakeholders within the company with decision-making authority. Yes, the C-Suite is a busy place, with little spare time for practice drills. The return on this investment, however, is incalculable. Colonial lost mountains of data to the attacker well before its systems were shut down. A nimble response at the first sign of intrusion could have changed everything,” Cattanach says.

· “Review your key contracts,” he says.
o “What obligations do you have to your business partners and customers to ensure you’ve instituted all reasonable cybersecurity protections, and are in a position to control the damage when, not if, you’re the victim of a cyber-attack,” Cattanach says.
o “What limitations of liability have you negotiated with your customers regarding the consequences of a cyber-attack?”, Cattanach says.
o “What limitations of liability have your vendors imposed on you if their systems result in, or fail to prevent, a cyber-attack on you?” Cattanach says.

· “Segregate your IT systems, and tighten the screws on detection monitoring. You will never be able to completely prevent the threat actors from gaining access somewhere. The key is to make it as difficult as possible for them to move horizontally once they are in. That means self-imposed inefficiencies, which are counterintuitive to your IT experts. Silo your systems, and increase the detection threshold for anomalous activity. That will make it tougher for your company’s systems to operate as smoothly as you’d like, but the roadblocks this creates for attackers will pay critical dividends,” Cattanach says.

· “Communicate constantly with industry groups and regulators. Cyber criminals are creatures of habit. They look for a common vulnerability, and exploit it until it’s eliminated. Where else had these hackers been before Colonial Pipeline, and what could have been learned about this threat if more information had been shared?” Cattanach says.

The oldest human burial in Africa was a toddler laid to rest with a pillow
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An artist's interpretation of the child, who was laid to rest in a cave in eastern Kenya 78,000 years ago. It is believed to be the oldest human burial ever found in Africa.

By Katie Hunt, CNN

A toddler laid to rest with their head on a pillow in a cave in eastern Kenya is thought to be the oldest human burial ever found in Africa.

The remains of the child, who was between 2 ½ and 3 years old, date back 78,000 years and were found buried at the mouth of the Panga ya Saidi cave, according to new research published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Analysis of the cave sediment and the bones suggested that the burial was intentional and perhaps involved the child’s wider community in funeral rites, the authors of the study said, demonstrating that humans at that time were capable of symbolic thought and complex social behavior.
The arrangement of the surviving bone fragments showed that the child was placed lying gently on their right side, with their legs folded and drawn up toward their chest. The researchers also believe that the tiny body was tightly wrapped in a shroud — perhaps leaves or animal skins — and the head was supported by something made from a perishable material, possibly a pillow.

“This type of movement of the head is usually found in those burials where the head is resting over a pillow or perishable support — the moment that support disappears, disintegrates, decays, it creates a space below the head and because of gravity the head tilts,” said study author María Martinón-Torres, director at the National Research Center on Human Evolution (CENIEH) in Burgos, Spain.
“We could infer this child… was really put there in a specific position with a pillow under his head. This respect, this care, this tenderness — putting a child lying in an almost a sleeping position: I really think it’s one of most important — the earliest evidence in Africa — of humans living in the physical and the symbolic world,” Martinón-Torres said in a news briefing.

The importance of the find
While older burials by Neanderthals, archaic humans who disappeared around 40,000 years ago, and early Homo sapiens have been found in Europe and the Middle East dating back 120,000 years, the child’s skeleton represents the earliest evidence of intentional burial in Africa.

It’s not known why fewer burials have been found on the continent. It could be due to lack of fieldwork or differences in early mortuary practices, which can be hard to detect.
“Archaeologists have been very busy in the Near East and Europe for 150 years, with continuous excavations. If the same amount of work happened in Africa, we might find more and older burials,” said Michael Petraglia, coauthor of the study and a professor at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
Some of child’s bones were first found during excavations at Panga ya Saidi in 2013, but it wasn’t until 2017 that the skeleton of the child, who was later nicknamed “Mtoto,” meaning “child” in Swahili, was fully exposed.
“At this point, we weren’t sure what we had found. The bones were just too delicate to study in the field,” said study co-author Emmanuel Ndiema of the National Museums of Kenya. “We had a find that we were pretty excited about — but it would be a while before we understood its importance.”

Click here to read the full article on CNN.

Microsoft Teams’ new reading feature helps students during the pandemic and beyond
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Microsoft software with a video image of student reading and the passage errors found

By , The Verge

Microsoft is adding a new Reading Progress feature to Microsoft Teams, designed to help students improve their reading fluency. Reading Progress works by allowing students to record themselves reading a passage of text, and offering teachers the ability to assess accuracy rates, mispronunciations, and more.

Typically, students practice reading fluency in front of a teacher where they’ll read a passage out loud and the teacher will mark it accordingly. Teachers will measure the speed, accuracy, and expression of reading as part of this process. Microsoft accelerated its work on this feature during the pandemic, when it became clear it would be difficult for teachers to measure reading fluency remotely.

“With the pandemic, if you think about reading fluency, it gets really difficult … because you can’t be next to students,” explains Mike Tholfsen, a product manager for Microsoft Education, in an interview with The Verge. “You might be able to set up Teams calls or Zoom calls, but the vast majority of teachers aren’t doing that.”

A recent Stanford University study found that the pandemic has affected students’ reading ability, with a drop of around 30 percent in reading fluency in early grades. “When the pandemic hit we actually worked with the head of Microsoft Education and agreed lets speed up development,” says Tholfsen. “In the past year we put a lot of effort into it.”

Microsoft has been testing an early alpha version of Reading Progress with more than 350 teachers since October, and it’s now ready to roll this out as a free addition ahead of the next school year. The technology is powered by Azure on the backend, allowing a teacher to adjust its sensitivity to measure students with speech disorders or dyslexia.

Click here to read the full article on The Verge.

NASA solar probe becomes fastest object ever built as it ‘touches the sun’
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NASA's solar probe flying high speed in space surrounded by yellow light beams

By  , C|Net

Nothing built by human hands has ever traveled faster than NASA’s Parker Solar Probe, a diminutive, scorch-proof spacecraft about the size of a small car is practically “touching the sun.” In late April, it smashed two wild space records, dethroning the previous champion — which also happened to be NASA’s Parker Solar Probe — and its journey is really just beginning.

The probe, which launched in August 2018 on a mission to study the sun, has been flying ever closer to our solar system’s furnace using the planet Venus as a slingshot. On April 29, during its closest approach to the sun (known as “perihelion”), Parker was traveling at an almost unfathomable speed — enough to circle the Earth 13 times in a single hour.

Parker set two new records back in February 2020:

  • Fastest human-made object: 244,255 mph (393,044 km/h).
  • Closest spacecraft to the sun: 11.6 million miles (18.6 million kilometers).

But those records have now been surpassed. The new records stand at:

  • Fastest human-made object: 330,000 mph (532,000 km/h).
  • Closest spacecraft to the sun: 6.5 million miles (10.4 million kilometers).

Click here to read the full article on C|Net.

NASA and SpaceX still pushing for a Moon landing in 2024
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Image of the moon in space hovering over the atmosphere

By Miriam Kramer, Yahoo! News

NASA and SpaceX still appear to be pushing to meet the 2024 deadline to land astronauts back on the Moon first set by the Trump administration.

The big picture: In its first 100 days, the Biden administration undid many of the Trump administration’s policies but President Biden has largely hewed closely to Trump-era space policies.

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Catch up quick: Many in the space industry expected the 2024 deadline for the first Artemis landing would be quickly amended by the Biden administration, but NASA still appears to be working toward that ambitious goal.

“I think we all have to recognize that space is hard, and it’s an ambitious timetable, but that is what has been stated,” Bill Nelson, Biden’s nominee for NASA administrator said during his confirmation hearing last week.

NASA also just awarded SpaceX a contract to build a landing system that will take people to the lunar surface as part of the Artemis program.

“We’re going to build a lot of rockets and probably smash a bunch of them, but I think it will happen,” SpaceX’s Elon Musk said last week. “I think 2024 — it seems likely. We’re going to aim for sooner than that, but I think this is actually doable.”

Yes, but: While NASA and SpaceX are optimistic, there is plenty of reason to doubt the current timeline.

The space agency’s Space Launch System rocket — designed to bring astronauts to orbit around the Moon — has already been delayed by technical problems, and it’s not yet clear it if will fly for the first time before next year, possibly pushing the current timeline.

NASA’s acting administrator Steve Jurczyk has also said 2024 no longer appears to be possible.

Click here to read the full article on Yahoo! News.

Here’s how Apple’s AirTag trackers compare to Tile, and why the company is so upset with Apple
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a persons hand holding the iphone with the air tag app on the screen

By Todd Haselton, CNBC

Apple’s $29 AirTag lost item tracker begins shipping on April 30. I walked through what it’s like last week, but I recently bought a similar tracker from Tile.

Tile has been in the lost item tracking business for several years, and now counts Apple as its closest competitor.

I took both devices for a test drive to show you how they differ and to help explain why Tile is so upset that Apple is moving in on its turf.

Tile trackers aren’t new. They’ve been around for years and have been leading the market. Owners seem to love them. They’re convenient because you can attach them to bags, keys or other items, and then see where they are on a map on your phone.

Like AirTag, Tile trackers don’t use GPS. Instead, they rely on a network of other Tile devices that communicate with each other over Bluetooth. So, the more Tile devices there are out there, the greater your chances that someone with a Tile passes by yours and alerts your phone of your lost item’s location. Tile has sold more than 35 million devices, not including products from more than 30 partners with its technology built-in, which make up its network that spans 195 countries.

Apple’s AirTag is similar, except it taps into not only other AirTags but also Apple’s existing network of iPhones and Macs, which is nearing a billion devices. That gives Apple an advantage over Tile from the get-go, since it has a bigger network at launch, even if lots of people don’t buy an AirTag.

Here are a few of the things I like about Tile that you don’t get with Apple AirTag:

  • There’s a button on it you can press to ring your phone, in case you can’t find it around the house.
  • There are several sizes and shapes. I bought a $25 Tile Sticker that’s about the size of a quarter, a hair smaller than an AirTag. You can stick it to anything. AirTag requires a keychain or a separate holder.
  • Speaking of sizes, Tile sells a $29.99 “Slim” model that looks like a credit card and slips into a wallet. The Slim and Sticker models have up to three years of battery life, which is longer than the one year you get from Apple. But, the Pro and Mate versions of the Tile tags — the Pro has a louder speaker and longer Bluetooth range than the Mate — have user-replaceable batteries, which last a year, like AirTag.
  • Tile has a bunch of colors, including limited-edition options with patterns that you might like if you don’t want a white and silver AirTag that can only be customized with a few letters or an emoji.
  • Tile works with Android and iPhone, so you can still track stuff even if you don’t use an iPhone.
  • Tile’s tracking tech is built into other products, from earbuds to laptops and retainer cases.

But the biggest difference is the experience. AirTag is a lot more seamless since you just pull the battery tag and click “connect” on your iPhone.

Click here to read the full article on CNBC.

New Milky Way map reveals a wave of stars in our galaxy’s outer reaches
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map highlighting the outermost region of the Milky Way.

By Ashley Strickland, CNN

A new map reveals the outskirts of the Milky Way galaxy, including a wave of stars disturbed by a small galaxy on a collision course with our own.

Data collected from the European Space Agency’s Gaia mission and NASA’s Near Earth Object Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer has been used by astronomers to map the galactic halo and this group of stars. Their findings appear in a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Our Milky Way is a galaxy with multiple spiral arms emanating from a central disk. The empty-looking halo lies outside of these swirling arms. But there may be more to the halo than meets the eye.

The halo, which hosts a small population of stars, is also thought to contain a lot of dark matter. This mysterious substance, which is invisible and has eluded scientists for decades, is thought to comprise most of the mass in the universe.

A small neighboring galaxy, known as the Large Magellanic Cloud, orbits the Milky Way. The data used to create the map revealed that, like a ship, the Large Magellanic Cloud has cut through the Milky Way’s outer halo. This disturbance has left a rippling wave of stars behind the Large Magellanic Cloud, which is in the halo.

A collision of galaxies
Currently, the Large Magellanic Cloud is 160,000 light-years from Earth, and it only has about a quarter of the mass of our giant galaxy.

Research from 2019 suggests it will catastrophically collide with our own galaxy in 2 billion years.

The impact has a chance of sending our solar system hurtling through space.

The wake created by the Large Magellanic Cloud is about 200,000 light-years to 325,000 light-years from the galactic center.

While previous research suggested its existence, this new data provides confirmation, as well as the most detailed and accurate map of the galaxy’s outskirts.

In the image, the strip in the middle represents a 360-degree view of our galaxy overlaying a map of the galactic halo. A bright wave in the bottom left of the image is the wake of stars, and to the right is the Large Magellanic Cloud and the path it is taking.

A large, light blue feature in the top right shows a high concentration of stars in our galaxy’s northern hemisphere.

Understanding dark matter
The ripple left by the dwarf galaxy’s movement is also an opportunity to study dark matter. Even though dark matter is invisible, it provides structure throughout the universe — including the foundation for galaxies.

So if the Large Magellanic Cloud can cut through the Milky Way’s halo and leave a wave of stars, the same ripple should essentially act as an outline of the dark matter.

Dark matter is essentially pulling on the Large Magellanic Cloud to slow it down, shrinking the dwarf galaxy’s orbit around the Milky Way and causing the eventual collision.

Click here to read the full article on MSN.

Has the electric car’s moment arrived at last?
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Woman kneeling down to charge her electric car

BY CRAIG WELCH, National Geographic

Joe Biden’s father sold used cars, steeping the future president in the world of combustion engines. The younger Biden washed vehicles on weekends, borrowed a Chrysler off the lot to drive to the prom, and hit automobile auctions to help stock his dad’s dealership. President Biden still owns the green ’67 Corvette his father gave him as a wedding gift, which he told Car and Driver magazine has “a rear-axle ratio that really gets up and goes.”

But if the White House’s resident motorhead gets his way—and that remains a big “if”—we may one day look back on the Biden presidency as the beginning of the end for gasoline-powered cars and trucks in the United States.

Biden is proposing sweeping reforms to the nation’s energy system to tackle climate change. But they aren’t just aimed at greening the electric grid or driving the nation away from coal and natural gas. Transportation accounts for more than a quarter of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions; it’s proven particularly thorny to figure out how to reduce that, given the number of vehicles on the roads. So, Biden is pitching a host of ways to steer the country toward electric vehicles, or EVs.

By nearly every measure, the popularity of EVs and hybrid vehicles is already surging. Yet despite an avalanche of promising news, the shift away from gas-fueled cars remains stubbornly marginal, compared with the scale of the problem, even as global temperature records driven by fossil fuel use are broken year after year. Clean vehicles still account for just 2 percent of cars sold in the United States, 5 percent in China, and 10 percent in Europe—and those are the world’s biggest markets.

“This transition is by no means inevitable,” says Nic Lutsey, with the International Council on Clean Transportation, an independent research outfit that works with policymakers around the world.

Yet analysts, environmentalists, clean-tech experts, and auto industry-backed researchers all say the right mix of regulation, consumer incentives, and research support might just be enough to spur dramatic acceleration. And thus far, these experts agree, Biden seems intent on pulling the right levers.

“The dam is breaking; the tipping point is here,” says Sam Ricketts, a member of the team that authored Washington Governor Jay Inslee’s climate action plan during his presidential run. Many of Inslee’s ideas have since found their way into Biden’s plans. “The question is how fast can the auto industry go,” Ricketts says, “and can it be fast enough to confront the climate crisis?”

That will depend in no small part on what happens next in Washington, D.C.—and whether Biden and the Democrats, who hold the White House and a razor-thin majority in Congress, can even get the pieces into place.

So close, yet so far
Vehicles powered by electricity have been around since the auto industry’s inception—several of the first 19th-century cars were powered by electrons. But their real promise wasn’t apparent until Toyota began globally mass-producing the Prius hybrid 20 years ago. Less than a decade later, Tesla introduced the Roadster, its all-electric sports car, and got a $465 million Department of Energy loan, jump-starting production of its all-electric sedans. The loan has since been repaid, and Tesla is currently worth seven times as much as General Motors.

Today, the trend is impossible to miss. Just since 2016 EVs and hybrid sales have nearly doubled in North America, and in 2018, for the first time ever, sales rose even as gas prices collapsed. Last year, with an economy wracked by COVID-19, electric or partly-electric vehicle purchases rose almost 5 percent over 2019 as auto sales overall declined by 15 percent.

There are electric Hummers, an electric Mustang, and an electric Harley-Davidson motorcycle, and North American car manufacturers plan to triple the number of non-gas-powered models by 2024 to 203.

Battery and motor prices are falling, and the innovation and economies of scale that come into play when companies like Amazon, which plans to buy 100,000 electric delivery vehicles in coming years, require more mass-produced vehicles almost certainly will drive them down more. Just as solar and wind energy now cost pennies to produce, the cost of buying a fossil-fuel-free car or truck, by some estimates, may match traditional vehicle prices in five years or less. Ford expects that an upcoming electric version of its popular F150 pickup will be vastly cheaper to own, over time, than the gas-powered original.

In all, more than seven million electrified vehicles now travel the world’s streets. Tesla alone has produced more than one million. BMW has sold a half million and hopes to double that by this year. Volkswagen, the world’s largest automaker, has proposed dozens of electric models.

Click here to read the full article on National Geographic.

NASA, SpaceX Crew-2 prepare for another historic flight
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Four astronauts prepare for their flight. Standing side by side while wearing modern, all white, space suits.

By Julia Musto, Fox News

NASA’s SpaceX Crew-2 mission is set to launch for the International Space Station (ISS) on Thursday morning.

In a prelaunch press conference on Tuesday, representatives from the agency, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), and the European Space Agency (ESA) confirmed that they were set for a 6:11 a.m. ET liftoff from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Crew Dragon Endeavour, marking the second crew rotation on a commercial spacecraft mission and the first with two international partner astronauts.

NASA’s Shane Kimbrough and Megan McArthur, Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide and French astronaut Thomas Pesquet will embark on a six-month trip aboard the ISS.

Once there, International Space Station manager Joel Montalbano said they will conduct more than 260 scientific experiments and that the fourth crew member will help to increase the research and development for both the highly anticipated Artemis program and the low Earth orbit commercialization efforts.

“With the crew-2 launch, we welcome the European Space Agency’s flying an astronaut for the first time on Dragon. We also welcome back the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency flying on Dragon for a second time,” he added. “So, truly an international program and this is our future where we’ll have international partners on our vehicles for the future. That’s a goal and that’s where we’re planning to be.”
Speaking before Montalbano, Commercial Crew Program manager Steve Stitch said that the NASA-SpaceX team had its first “Readiness Review” and dress rehearsal on Tuesday morning, leading to the conclusion that it was “on track” for Thursday and that — assuming there are no changes — docking would be scheduled for Friday at around 4:30 a.m. ET.

“The main thing we’re watching over the next few days is the weather. You know we have to have the launch weather be ‘go’ and also ‘abort’ weather all along the abort ground track to protect the crew in the vehicle. So, we’re looking at both Thursday and Friday and looking at the weather over the next few days,” he said.

Launch Weather Officer Brian Cizek, from U.S. Space Force’s 45th Weather Squadron, explained that there is currently an 80% chance of favorable weather on Thursday and a 90% chance of favorable weather on Friday.

Click here to read the full article on Fox News.

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Upcoming Events

  1. Commercial UAV Expo Americas, Las Vegas
    September 7, 2021 - September 9, 2021
  2. 2021 ERG & Council Conference
    September 15, 2021 - September 17, 2021
  3. Wonder Women Tech
    October 26, 2021 - October 29, 2021
  4. HACU’s 35th Annual Conference
    October 30, 2021 - November 1, 2021
  5. AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference
    February 6, 2022 - February 8, 2022