Identical twin sisters marry identical twin brothers: Meet their babies

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identical twin siblings Jeremy and Briana (on the left, we're pretty sure) are parents to Jax, and Josh and Brittany are parents to Jett.salyerstwins / Instagram

By , TODAY

Identical twins Briana and Brittany, 35, married identical twins Josh and Jeremy Salyers, 37, and now they’re introducing the world to their babies, who are so genetically similar that the cousins are more like brothers.

“You’ve heard the term Irish twins and you’ve heard identical twins and fraternal twins,” Briana Salyers told TODAY Parents. “But we have quaternary twins.”

The Salyers are parents to Jett, who turned 1 in January, and Jax, who will turn 1 in April, and the cousins share more than the same first initial. Their unique situation makes them genetic brothers.

“They were born to identical twin parents less than nine months apart,” Brittany Salyers explained. “Twins married to twins who both have babies at the same time.”

Since identical twins share the same DNA, the children of two pairs of identical twins are legally cousins, but genetically more similar to siblings.

The sisters shared they had both discussed the possibility of quaternary twins.

“We were hoping that we would have overlapping pregnancies so that this would happen. We thought it would be really cool,” Briana said. “There’s only 300 quaternary marriages known in the history of the world.”

The couples, who share a joint Instagram page, posted the interesting scientific fact alongside a photo of the young boys side-by-side.

“Jett and Jax: Cousins, Genetic Brothers, and Quaternary Twins!” the caption read.

The couples married in a joint ceremony at the 2018 Twins Days Festival in Twinsburg, Ohio. Brittany and Briana met Joshua and Jeremy at the Twins Days Festival the year before and their fairy tale weddings were captured on camera for TLC.

Both families live under one roof in Virginia and run a wedding venue site together.

“It was something we all four wanted and when we got engaged, we all wanted it that way,” Brittany told TODAY of the unconventional living arrangement. “It’s something that’s very nice. (Josh and Jeremy) understand the twin bond like we do. We get to have a lot of together time.”

Sharing their compelling journey online doesn’t come without negative commentary for the families.

“We try to ignore sociopathic stalker comments and just focus on the positive,” Brittany said. “Some people think we are really strange and others think it’s really amazing. We’ve gotten a lot of support and interest and we’ve been grateful for that.”

As for future babies, the couples are undecided.

“We are debating if we should go for one more pregnancy each or not,” Briana said. “We will make a decision pretty soon. The babies are still pretty young (and) we are trying to wait a little longer to see what to do.”

Click here to read the full article on TODAY.

Billionaire Robert Hale Gave Grads $1,000 Cash In Envelopes At Ceremony
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Robert Hale headshot

Billionaire Robert Hale doled out millions of dollars recently to 2,500 graduates at the University of Massachusetts, Boston — giving each one $1,000 in cash as they accepted their diplomas—the latest billionaire donation for students, as the price of tuition skyrockets.

Hale, the commencement speaker at UMass Boston, gave students two envelopes that each contained $500, the Boston Globe reported.

The billionaire co-founder and CEO of Granite Telecommunications told seniors to keep one of the envelopes for themselves, and donate the other to a charity of their choice, calling it a “gift of giving”—though whether they donate the money is up to them.

For Hale, the sudden loss of $2.5 million only represents a drop in the bucket of his $5 billion net worth, according to Forbes’ valuation.

It’s also his second time giving college graduates cash: Hale in 2021 handed $1,000 to all 270 graduating students who attended their commencement address at Quincy College, several miles outside Boston.

$15,535. That’s how much in-state students pay per year in tuition and mandatory fees at UMass Boston, a predominantly commuter school, according to the school’s bursar’s office. For out-of-state students, one year at UMass Boston costs $37,211, just below the average price of tuition at a private college in the U.S. ($37,600, according to the National Center for Education Statistics), and well below the price of Columbia University, the school with the most expensive college tuition in the country ($69,986).

Read the full article posted on Forbes here.

College Majors With the Best Return on Investment
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female collge grad in cap and gown opening champagne

By Cole Claybourn, U.S. News & World Report

Engineering and health-care majors top the list for ROI.

It’s no secret that college is expensive.

Both private and public institutions ranked by U.S. News saw tuition increases for the 2022-2023 academic year, according to data submitted in an annual survey. Average tuition and fees at ranked private universities was about $40,000, while ranked public universities cost nearly $23,000 for out-of-state students and $10,500 for in-state students.

In turn, the average student loan debt continues to rise, currently clocking in at about $30,000 per borrower, according to U.S. News data.

Though students may encounter difficulties paying for it, college is a worthwhile investment when done wisely, experts say. In 2021, the median weekly wage for full-time workers age 25 and older who had at least a bachelor’s degree was $1,334, compared to $809 for those with only a high school diploma and no college, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

What a student studies can further affect the calculation. Certain degrees yield a better return on investment than others, according to data from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

Degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, known collectively as STEM, the data shows, are among those with the highest ROI.

“STEM careers continue to offer highly competitive salaries in the job market,” Jackson Gruver, a data analyst at online salary database Payscale, wrote in an email. “These ‘hot’ jobs rely on specialized skill sets that are hard to come by. Such talent scarcity drives up the demand for these workers along with their pay. Whether it’s engineering, medical or data sciences – these laborers will see an abundance of opportunities in the job market that compensate well.”

Georgetown’s CEW analyzed data from the U.S. Department of Education’s College Scorecard to determine a list of 34 degrees with the highest ROI. It uses four categories to determine which degrees hold the most economic value: median monthly earnings net of debt, median monthly debt payments, median annualized earnings net of debt, and median debt.

Read the complete article and more STEM news on U.S. News & World Report here.

Post Malone Calls NASA Astronauts in Space for Earth Day
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post malone speaking remotely with astronauts

In a special Earth Day conversation, artist and music producer Post Malone spoke with NASA astronauts Steve Bowen and Woody Hoburg, who are currently living and working on the International Space Station.

Malone chatted with the astronauts about their favorite views from the orbiting laboratory, how their unique perspective changed how they see Earth, and what makes our home special.

The space station is an orbiting laboratory traveling at a speed of 17,500 mph (25,000 kph), completing one trip around Earth about every 90 minutes. Crew members carry out research and conduct thousands of experiments that have contributed to medical and social benefits on our home planet, allowing us to find new ways to combat disease and develop technologies to deliver clean water to remote communities in need.

Click to view on YouTube!

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Victor Glover Set To Become The First Black Man NASA Sends To The Moon

Black Artists Encouraged to Apply For Global Musicians Partnership Program
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Kansas City is the first and only UNESCO Creative City of Music in the United States. Established in 2017, Creative City KC, Inc. is a not-for-profit and the focal point organization for the nation’s membership in the UNESCO Creative Cities Network (UCCN). On Wednesday, April 12, 2023, Creative City KC will present its annual meeting and give details about the benefits of accessing this worldwide platform.

The prestigious designation was authored by Anita Dixon-Brown, Founder and Executive Director of Creative City KC Inc. She comments, “Kansas City is internationally recognized as one of the four major development cities for the genre of Jazz. This history won us the designation. Charlie Parker, Count Basie, and SWING made us stand out. As the only UNESCO Creative City of Music in the United States, we are opening opportunities for musicians to expand their reach, travel, record, and perform across the world through this vast network.”

With culture at the forefront of these partnerships, Creative City KC Inc., aims to propel musicians into accessing the power of connecting with others globally. “We advocate for the advancement of UNESCO and UCCN core values, 17 Sustainable Development Goals, Peace through Music, International Cooperation through Creativity, and work to advance the African Diaspora in Kansas City and around the world,” said Dr. Jacob Wagner, Professor of Urban Planning & Design at the University of Missouri – Kansas City, and co-founder of the designation.

An email of interest to creativecitykc@gmail.com is sufficient to begin the process of becoming a Partner with UNESCO Creative City of Music-USA. They will then send you a short, online survey to request additional information about the nature of your project or partnership.

About the founder
Anita Dixon-Brown has been a Cultural Heritage Consultant for over 30 years, developing tours of historic sites for African Americans nationally, consulting on major heritage projects such as preserving the sites of the Underground Railroad in American history, and demonstrating heritage tourism as a major economic tool for urban community sustainability. For more details about her, visit SageWorldView.com

Source: BlackNews.com

STEM Internship Opportunities for Diverse Students
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A blue piggy bank wearing a graduation cap with stacks of coins next to it.

IOScholarships (IOS), the first of its kind scholarship and financial education platform for minority STEM students has been designed with a streamlined user-friendly interface that offers great functionality to help high school, undergraduate and graduate students find STEM scholarships and internship opportunities. IOScholarships proprietary matching algorithm can match students with life-changing scholarships where their diverse background is valued.

Statistically speaking, minorities tend to be underrepresented in STEM fields. That’s why corporations often create internship opportunities for minorities entering the industry.

“As the job market is becoming more competitive in addition to GPA and personal achievements, employers want to see applicants who have completed one or more internships,” said María Fernanda Trochimezuk, Founder of IOScholarships.

Below we’ve highlighted some of the many internships for minorities in STEM fields

Facebook Software Engineer Internship

The Software Engineer Internship is available to undergraduate and graduate students who are pursuing a degree in computer science or a related field. Interns will help build the next generation of systems behind Facebook’s products, create web applications that reach millions of people, build high volume servers, and be a part of a team that’s working to help people connect with each other around the globe.

Microsoft Internship Program

For Women and Minorities this program is specifically designed for undergraduate minority college freshmen and sophomores interested in a paid summer internship in software engineering. Students must major in Computer Science, Computer Engineering or related disciplines.

Minority Access Internship

The Minority Access Internship Program has internships on offered in the spring, summer and fall to college sophomores, juniors, seniors, graduates, and professionals. Interns receive pre-employment training and counseling on career choices as well as professional development, with the possibility of full-time employment after graduation.

Google Internships

Google offers rich learning experiences for college students that include pay. As a technical intern, you are excited about tackling the hard problems in technology. With internships across the globe, ranging from Software Engineering to User Experience, Google offers many opportunities to grow with them.

The majority of the scholarships and internships featured on the IOScholarships website come directly from corporations and organizations, rather than solely from competitive national pools – thereby maximizing the number of opportunities students have to earn funding for their education.

The platform also offers a Career Aptitude Quiz designed to help students identify the degrees and professions that best fit their skills.

For more information about IOScholarships visit www.ioscholarships.com.

Astronomers discover largest known spinning structures in the universe
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An artist's impression of a spinning cosmic filament that astronomers found

By , Space.com

Tendrils of galaxies up to hundreds of millions of light-years long may be the largest spinning objects in the universe, a new study finds. Celestial bodies often spin, from planets to stars to galaxies. However, giant clusters of galaxies often spin very slowly, if at all, and so many researchers thought that is where spinning might end on cosmic scales, study co-author Noam Libeskind, a cosmologist at the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam in Germany, told Space.com.

But in the new research, Libeskind and his colleagues found that cosmic filaments, or gigantic tubes made of galaxies, apparently spin. “There are structures so vast that entire galaxies are just specks of dust,” Libeskind said. “These huge filaments are much, much bigger than clusters.”

Previous research suggested that after the universe was born in the Big Bang about 13.8 billion years ago, much of the gas that makes up most of the known matter of the cosmos collapsed to form colossal sheets. These sheets then broke apart to form the filaments of a vast cosmic web.

Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the scientists examined more than 17,000 filaments, analyzing the velocity at which the galaxies making up these giant tubes moved within each tendril. The researchers found that the way in which these galaxies moved suggested they were rotating around the central axis of each filament.

The fastest the researchers saw galaxies whirl around the hollow centers of these tendrils was about 223,700 mph (360,000 kph). The scientists noted they do not suggest that every single filament in the universe spins, but that spinning filaments do seem to exist.

The big question is, “Why do they spin?” Libeskind said. The Big Bang would not have endowed the universe with any primordial spin. As such, whatever caused these filaments to spin must have originated later in history as the structures formed, he said.

Click here to read the full article on Space.com.

This is what it’s like to walk in space
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Astronaut Ed White during the first American spacewalk.

By Ashley Strickland, CNN

When astronauts venture outside of the International Space Station to go on spacewalks, the most important thing they have to do is focus. This may sound simple, but imagine trying to focus on a memorized set of tasks while stepping out of an airlock and wearing a 300-pound spacesuit — with the glow of planet Earth and the sun and the dark void of the universe all around you. A tether connects you to the space station, and the absence of gravity keeps you from falling.

“There’s a lot of things that you really need to do, one of which is just keep your focus, even though it’s amazing out there,” said NASA astronaut Mike Fincke. “It’s really truly breathtaking. The only thing between you and the rest of the universe, seeing the whole cosmos of creation, is the glass faceplate of your visor on your helmet, and it’s just awe-inspiring.”

Astronaut Mike Fincke conducted a spacewalk on August 3, 2004, while wearing the Russian Orlan spacesuit. You can see Earth behind him.

Depending on the orientation of the space station, which completes 16 orbits of the Earth each day while moving at 17,500 miles per hour, our planet can appear above or below the astronauts.

Fincke is a veteran of spaceflight. He’s spent 382 days in space, and he’s gone on nine spacewalks in Russian and American spacesuits. Fincke is training in Texas for his fourth spaceflight and will launch to the space station later this year on the first crewed experimental test flight of Boeing’s Starliner.
More than 550 people have been to space and about half of them have been on a spacewalk, Fincke said. Spacewalks are often referred to as EVAs, or extravehicular activities.

The first spacewalk by an American astronaut was conducted by NASA astronaut Ed White on June 3, 1965. He left the Gemini 4 capsule at 3:45 p.m. ET and remained outside of it for 23 minutes. (Soviet cosmonaut Aleksei A. Leonov completed the world’s first spacewalk on March 18 of that year.)

Gemini 4 circled the Earth 66 times in four days. During the spacewalk, White began over the Pacific Ocean near Hawaii and went back inside the capsule as they flew over the Gulf of Mexico.
He exited the spacecraft using a hand-held oxygen-jet gun to push himself out, attached to a 25-foot safety tether. NASA astronaut James McDivitt, on the mission with White, took photos of White in space from inside the capsule.
White later said the spacewalk was the most comfortable part of the mission, and said the order to end it was the “saddest moment” of his life, according to NASA.

Click here to read the full article on CNN.

10 Women Scientists Leading the Fight Against the Climate Crisis
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Rose Mutiso speaks at TEDSummit: A Community Beyond Borders. July 2019, Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo: Bret Hartman / TED | Flickr/TED Conference

By Tshiamo Mobe, Global Citizen

Climate change is an issue that affects everyone on the planet but women and girls are the ones suffering its effects the most. Why? Because women and girls have less access to quality education and later, job opportunities. These structural disadvantages keep them in poverty. In fact, women make up 70% of the world’s poor. In a nutshell, climate change impacts the poor the most and the poor are mostly women.

Poverty driven by and made worse by climate change also makes girls more susceptible to child marriage, because it drives hunger and girls getting married often means one less mouth to feed for their parents. Climate change also leads to geopolitical instability which, in turn, results in greater instances of violence — which we know disproportionately impacts women and girls.

Ironically, saving the planet has been made to seem a “women’s job”. This phenomenon, dubbed the “eco gender gap”, sees the burden of climate responsibility placed squarely on women’s shoulders through “green” campaigns and products that are overwhelmingly marketed to women.

There are several hypotheses for why this is. Firstly, women are the more powerful consumers (they drive 70-80% of all purchasing decisions). Secondly, they are disproportionately responsible, still, for the domestic sphere. And finally, going green is seen as a women’s job because women’s personalities are supposedly more nurturing and socially responsible.

Women should be involved in fighting the climate crisis at every level — from the kitchen to the science lab to the boardroom. Ruth Bader Ginsburg explained it best when she said: “Women belong in all places where decisions are being made.” However, women are underrepresented in the science field (including climate science), with just 30% of research positions held by women and fewer still holding senior positions. The Reuters Hot List of 1,000 scientists features just 122 women.

Having more women climate scientists could allow for an increased emphasis on understanding and providing solutions for some of the most far-reaching implications of climate change. Diversity in background and experiences allows for different perspectives. More perspectives allow for different research questions to arise or even a different approach to the same question.

There are, however, women all over the world in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) that have made some incredible strides in the fight against the climate crisis, from fire-resistant coating to protect places prone to wildfires, to a water-storing park for a region usually overwhelmed by floods. Here are just some of the world’s incredible women scientists leading the way on tackling the climate crisis.

Click here to read the full article on Global Citizen.

The 10 Best STEM Schools  
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As 2023 has arrived, you may be looking to take the next big step in your STEM education journey. While specific needs will differ from person to person, knowing which schools are the best for a STEM education can be a great start.

Here are the top STEM schools of the last year:

Massachusetts Institute of Technology: The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, most popularly referred to as MIT, is a private land-grant research university. The school is best known for its key role in the development of modern technology and science.

  • Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • Average Tuition: $74,500 without grants, $21,100 with grants
  • Acceptance Rate: 7%
  • Graduation Rate: 94%
  • Notable Alumni: Apollo 11 Astronaut: Buzz Aldrin; Economics Nobel laureate: Esther Duflo; CEO of General Motors: Alfred P. Sloan

Georgia Institute of Technology: The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly referred to as Georgia Tech, is a public research university and institute of technology. Their specialty is in science and technology, but they are additionally recognized as an elite institution for computer science, engineering and business.

  • Location: Atlanta, Georgia
  • Average Tuition: $30,600 without grants, $18,400 with grants
  • Acceptance Rate: 21%
  • Graduation Rate: 87%
  • Notable Alumni: President Jimmy Carter; Nobel Prize in Chemistry Winner: Kary Mullis; CEO of Earthlink: Charles “Garry” Betty

California Institute of Technology: The California Institute of Technology, also known as Caltech, is a private research university known for its specialties in science and engineering. Caltech is ranked among the best academic institutions in the world and is among the most selective in the U.S.

  • Location: Pasadena, California
  • Average Tuition: $79,900 without grants, $28,100 with grants
  • Acceptance Rate: 6%
  • Graduation Rate: 92%
  • Notable Alumni: Father of Silicon Valley: William Shockley; Co-founder of JPL: Qian Xuesen; Director of NSF: France A. Córdova

Harvey Mudd College: Harvey Mudd College is an American private college in Claremont, California focused on science and engineering. The school produces graduates who earn the highest mid-career salaries of any college or university in the country.

  • Location: Claremont, California
  • Average Tuition: $81,800 without grants, $39,300 with grants
  • Acceptance Rate: 14%
  • Graduation Rate: 92%
  • Notable Alumni: Co-inventor of SQL: Donald D. Chamberlain; Former US Ambassador to Israel: Richard H. Jones; Esports commentator and game designer: Sean “Day9” Plott

Stanford University: Stanford University is a private research university and one of the top-ranking universities in the world. Though they have many specialties, they are known for their graduate programs in law, medicine, education and business.

  • Location: Stanford, California
  • Average Tuition: $80,400 without grants, $21,100 with grants
  • Acceptance Rate: 4%
  • Graduation Rate: 94%
  • Notable Alumni: President John F. Kennedy; Astronaut Mae Jemison; Co-creator of the internet: Vint Cerf

University of California, Berkeley: A founding member of the Association of American Universities, UC Berkeley is a public land-grant research university. As one of the top universities in the country, Berkley hosts many leading research institutes dedicated to science, engineering and mathematics.

  • Location: Berkeley, California
  • Average Tuition: $42,700 without grants, $20,400 with grants
  • Acceptance Rate: 16%
  • Graduation Rate: 92%
  • Notable Alumni: Co-founder of Apple Computer: Steve Wozniak; Astronaut Leroy Chiao; Nobel laureate in Physics and former Secretary of Energy: Steven Chu

University of California, San Diego: UC San Diego is a public land-grant research university specializing in medicine and oceanography. The school is home to the region’s only academic health system, UC San Diego Health.

  • Location: La Jolla, California
  • Average Tuition: $36,300 without grants, $16,100 with grants
  • Acceptance Rate: 31%
  • Graduation Rate: 86%
  • Notable Alumni: Philanthropist and GoPro Founder: Nick Woodman; Nobel Prize Winner in Medicine: Susumu Tonegawa; Professor and Political Activist: Angela Davis

Texas A&M University-College Station: Texas A&M is a public land-grant research university and senior military college. They are home to one of the largest student bodies in the United States and hold simultaneous designations as a land, sea and space grant institution.

  • Location: College Station, Texas
  • Average Tuition: $32,300 without grants, $21,000 with grants
  • Acceptance Rate: 58%
  • Graduation Rate: 82%
  • Notable Alumni: Former US Secretary of Energy: Ricky Perry; Mechanical engineer and first woman to be chief flight director at NASA: Holly Ridings; CEO of U.S. Wal-Mart Stores: Eduardo Castro-Wright

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign: The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, or UIUC for short, is a public land-grant research university. Besides producing several Nobel laureates and Pulitzer Prize winners, UIUC is home to the second-largest university library in the country and the fastest supercomputer on a university campus. They are also home to Research Park, an innovation center for some of the biggest start-ups and corporations in the country.

  • Location: Champaign, Illinois
  • Average Tuition: $32,000 without grants, $14,300 with grants
  • Acceptance Rate: 59%
  • Graduation Rate: 84%
  • Notable Alumni: Double Nobel prize winner in Physics: John Bardeen; Paypal Creator: Max Levchin; YouTube Founders: Steve Chen and Jawed Karim

University of Michigan: The University of Michigan is a public research university consisting of nineteen colleges and degrees in 250 disciplines. They specialize in architecture and urban planning, business, medicine, law, public policy, pharmacy, social work, public health and dentistry. The school has produced over 250 high-level government officials such as senators, cabinet secretaries and governors.

  • Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • Average Tuition: $32,000 without grants, $14,300 with grants
  • Acceptance Rate: 23%
  • Graduation Rate: 92%
  • Notable Alumni: Former United States Secretary of Agriculture: Julius Sterling Morton; Boeing co-founder: Edgar Nathaniel Gott; Founder of the Swarm Corporation and “Father of Artificial Life”: Chris Langton

Sources: Money.com, College Avenue Student Loans, Wikipedia

Mars Had Liquid Water On Its Surface. Here’s Why Scientists Think It Vanished
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A close-up of Mars taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. New research suggests that the red planet may be too small to have ever had large amounts of surface water.

By , NPR

All evidence points to the fact that Mars once had flowing water, but numerous flybys, orbiters, landers and rovers have confirmed one undeniable fact — any liquid water that was once on its surface is now long gone.

A study out of Washington University in St. Louis might have found the reason: Mars, which is about half the size of Earth, and just over one-tenth the mass of our own watery world, might just be too small.

One idea, the Mars Ocean Hypothesis, suggests that Mars not only had some liquid water, but a lot of it. But the new study’s co-author Kun Wang says his team’s finding, which was published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, pours cold water on that notion.

“Mars’ fate was decided from the beginning,” Wang, an assistant professor of Earth and planetary sciences, said in a statement. “There is likely a threshold on the size requirements of rocky planets to retain enough water to enable habitability and plate tectonics.”

That’s because the lower mass and gravity of Mars makes it easier for volatile elements and compounds such as water to escape from its surface into space.

Led by Zhen Tian, a graduate student in Wang’s laboratory, the researchers looked at 20 Martian meteorites ranging in age from about 200 million years old to 4 billion years, dating to a time when the solar system was still in the chaos of formation.

The researchers analyzed a somewhat volatile element — potassium — to help understand how water would have behaved on the surface of Mars.

Speaking to NPR, Wang said the team measured the ratio of two isotopes of potassium — potassium-39 and potassium-41 — in the meteorites. In lower gravity environments, such as Mars, the potassium-39 is more easily lost to space, leaving behind a higher ratio of the heavier isotope, potassium-41. Water behaves in much the same way, indicating that most of it would have been lost to space during the formation of Mars.

It’s something Wang and his colleagues saw even in the oldest meteorites, suggesting that this was an issue for Martian water right from the beginning.

The team also looked at samples from the moon and from an asteroid, both much smaller and drier than either Earth or Mars, to study the potassium isotopes in them. They found a direct correlation between mass and the volatiles — or lack thereof — in the samples.

The liquid water that did remain on the Martian surface carved out the now-desiccated canyons, riverbeds and other formations that we see there today, Wang says. But that water, too, would likely have disappeared had it not been trapped as ice at the Martian poles as the climate on the planet became colder, he notes.

Click here to read the full article on NPR.

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