7 Networking Tips to Meet Your Career Goals

LinkedIn
group of business people networking event

Building your network is vital no matter where you are in your career journey. For first-time job seekers, networking can help you gain opportunities in your ideal work environments and obtain employment. Seasoned employees can get references, find assistance in moving up the ladder, secure partnerships for their company and attain job opportunities. No matter your situation, here are seven networking tips that will help you make those connections.

Attend Events

The best resource you have for making new connections is through events. Conferences and trade shows are great places to meet like-minded professionals with similar goals. Most everyone is there to learn, network and create more opportunities for themselves, so you might as well be the first person to make a possible connection.

Set Goals

It’s always nice to attend an event with a friend, but if you do, be sure to split up. Spending all your time with people you already know negates the purpose of networking. Set a goal to meet a certain number of new people at each event. Networking is like cold calling: The more you do it, the less scary it becomes. If you’re nervous about being rejected, try greeting the newcomers to the event. They’ll be eternally grateful. As you consistently meet new people, you’ll realize you no longer have that urge to retreat to the safety of your familiar faces, and you’ll find more people wanting to meet you!

Go In With Confidence

When it comes to encouraging a friend regarding their abilities, it’s easy to point out all their redeeming qualities and assets. Still, when it comes to advocating for ourselves, it can be difficult. In the same way you assess your friends’ qualities, take a minute to evaluate your wants and attributes and how they would be helpful to someone else. Then, take that knowledge and talk about your contributions in the way you would talk about someone else’s achievements. The more confident you are in your abilities, the more someone else will realize what a valuable connection you would be.

Join Professional Groups

Take part in local organizations, participate in meetups and get involved wherever and whenever you can. Once you’ve decided to join an organization, don’t just sit back and relax. Participate actively by joining a committee or taking a leadership role. By doing so, you’ll learn more, meet people and make yourself memorable.

Use Those Business Cards

One of the most popular and convenient ways to connect with your new contacts in the future is to exchange information through business cards. If you don’t already, get some business cards made that detail your basic information. At a minimum, business cards should include your name, position, company, email and/or telephone number. Bring more business cards than you believe you’ll need, and make sure to get the other person’s card as well.

Listen

Show that you are genuinely interested in what your contacts have to say. Ask open-ended questions and absorb the information they share. Then, try to keep note of the important aspects of the conversation. Like any other affiliation, people value a relationship in which the other person not only engages in both sides of the conversation but demonstrates an effort to remember the details and importance of their interaction.

Follow Up

You can meet as many people as you’d like, but if you never utilize their contact information, you may lose your connection. Within 48 hours of meeting an individual, send them a follow-up email reminding them of who you are—reference specifics about what you discussed at the event. If you mentioned meeting for lunch, follow up with a specific invitation; if you suggested talking by phone, set a time for the call. Acting within 48 hours helps cement you in the other person’s mind and starts building the relationship.

Integrate Online and Offline

Incorporate your real-world networking contacts into your social networking efforts. When you meet someone at an event, follow up with an invitation to connect on LinkedIn or another social media site. Similarly, meeting up with your online contacts offline can be a great way to take those relationships to the next level. Try organizing a meetup of one of your most useful online networking groups.

Give As Much as You Get

As you continue to grow your network, share your knowledge and expertise with others. Become part of their networks and offer to help or connect people when you see an opportunity. Just as you and a friend continually support each other, be there to support the meaningful business associations in your life.

Plan for the Long-Term

Although making a connection and exchanging contact information is a solid start, concentrate on forming long-term, mutually beneficial relationships. You may not need a connection today, but someday you might.

Sources: U.S. Small Business Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs

Does Your Resume Pass the ATS?
LinkedIn
sample resume

By Natalie Rodgers

You may be able to impress a hiring manager with your resume, but can you pass the ATS test? Over the last several years, many companies have begun using applicant tracking system (ATS) software to review resumes before they are given to an actual human. This software is designed to weed out the resumes with irrelevant experience and pass along the ones deemed applicable by a pre-determined system. Unfortunately, technology isn’t perfect and can discard your resume even if you’re an excellent fit for the position.

While there isn’t a foolproof way to ensure that your resume never gets discarded, there are things you can do to eliminate the chances of this happening. Here are some tweaks you can give your resume in order to pass the ATS test:

Apply for Qualified Positions

It can be tempting to apply for any and every job, even the ones you’re not qualified for. Unfortunately, if your resume shows that you are underqualified or overqualified for a position, it could be weeded out before an employer ever sees it. Make sure the resume you are submitting reflects not only the job qualifications but your experience. This doesn’t mean that you can only apply for jobs you’ve had experience in or that you have to match every detail of the job description perfectly, but you should stay in the realm of your experiences for the best chance to pass ATS and human reviewers alike.

You’ll want to limit yourself to only applying for several positions at one company. If a company you’re interested in is offering two positions you’re qualified for, then apply to both. Still, if you apply for multiple jobs with different qualifying factors, your resume may not pass ATS testing.

Use Keywords

In tandem with qualifications, you’ll want to use keywords in your resume that heighten your chances of passing ATS software. One of the easiest ways to do this is to review the job posting and include the listed hard skills in your resume. For example, if they’re looking for a candidate who is proficient in Microsoft Office and has experience with WordPress, you’ll want to state those two skills in your resume explicitly. You may even want to consider rewording your current resume to fit the exact terminology of the job posting, as some ATS software looks for resumes with that specific wording.

Keywords can also include specific licensing and certifications, full spellings of abbreviated terms (spelling out Bachelor of the Arts rather than stating BA), and even the job title of the position you’re applying for. These keywords should additionally be used in the correct context instead of being randomly thrown into your resume.

Format Your Resume Correctly

Make sure you’re submitting your resume using the specific format requested by the employer. Even with the correct terminology, sometimes resumes are defeated by confusing formatting. If there isn’t a particular format given, the safest option is to submit your resume as a Word document (.docx), as that format is most accurately processed by ATS software.

You’ll also want to keep the design of your resume simple. Design aspects often misread by ATS systems include graphics, text boxes, tables, columns, hyperlinks and headers and footers. While adding fancy borders and formatting can make your resume visually impressive, the composition can come through incorrectly on other computers and during ATS processing. Consider formatting your resume as a chronological, combination or functional resume and eliminate visual effects.

Sources: CareerOneStop, The Muse

Dressing for the Job You Want
LinkedIn
Group photo of five people from a small startup companies. Entrepreneurs doing business.

By Natalie Rodgers

The saying “dress for the job you want” is still crucial advice when it comes to an interview. Even if you have the desired attributes and skillsets to your employer, wearing a sloppy or inappropriate outfit can greatly decrease your chances of being hired and being taken seriously. Picking the right outfit, however, will not only show your potential employer that you care for yourself and the occasion, but will give you the confidence to proceed through the interview as your best self.

Here’s what you need to know when it comes to dressing for your interview day:

Do Your Research

Look into what kind of company you are interviewing with and what kind of clothing the day-to-day job would consist of. Depending on these answers, you may need to dress up or down a little more than your original outfit plans. If the workplace you’re applying to has a more relaxed environment, such as a startup company, you’ll probably be okay with dressing in something a little more business casual. However, if you’re applying to a big firm that requires a suit and tie, you might want to take on a more business formal wardrobe.

If you’re ever in doubt, it’s always a better idea to dress up then to dress down. Business casual is also a safe bet for most workplaces.

The Types of Dress

Before you do anything, you’ll want to know about the different kinds of professional dress, especially if a certain one has been requested by your interviewer. The types of outfits include:

Group of young multiracial business people are working in modern office. Freelancers in coworking place. Creative and stylish youth.
Business Casual
Casual: If you are in a rare instance where casual apparel is acceptable for the workplace, this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s acceptable to wear a graphic t-shirt and a pair of shorts to your meeting. For a professional, yet casual look, you’ll want to wear something that is comfortable, but would also be acceptable to wear at a nice restaurant. For a professional casual interview, here are some fashion pieces you can pair together:

  • A button up shirt, polo or blouse free of logos, words and pictures. Patterns and design are okay, but make sure they aren’t too distracting
  • Dark jeans or pants
  • A knee length skirt or dress without patterns or designs that are too distracting
  • A plain colored cardigan
  • Clean closed-toe shoes

Business Casual: Business casual is one of the most common types of dress for an interview and a safe bet for just about any workplace interview. These outfits should be more dressed up than the “casual” outfit, but not fancy enough to wear to a wedding or formal event. Fashion items for a business causal outfit consist of:

  • Dark dress pants, slacks or pencil skirts
  • Button up shirts or blouses without logo, design and very limited pattern

Business Formal: Business formal is another step up from business causal and are typically outfits that can also be worn to events or places with more prestige. Law firms and many government positions usually include this kind of dress. The attire consists of:

  • Dark-colored, full suits
  • Suit pants or slim-fit, knee-length skirts
  • Blouses or button-down shirts accompanied by a jacket that preferably matches the bottom
  • Tailored dresses accompanied with a nice jacket
  • A tie
  • Fancier closed toe shoes such as loafers, heels, flats or oxfords

young african american businesspeople in office
Business Formal
As for makeup and accessories, both are acceptable and even encouraged for interviews, but you’ll want to make sure to keep both as simple as possible. Going for a more “natural” look is best for makeup and wearing jewelry that isn’t too bulky, noisy, distracting or inhibitive of normal body movements is best. You want to make sure that your focus is on the interview and not the discomfort of your clothes or accessories.

Clean it Up!

Before you throw on your big interview outfit, make sure that everything is clean and looks as pristine as possible. Make sure to iron your clothes (if needed), hang them up to prevent further wrinkling, free them of tags or loose strings and, above all, eliminate any negative odors.

Remember, your outfit should make you confident and compliment the experience and skillset that you know will benefit this workplace. Now go get them!

Sources: Indeed, The Balance Money

Five Ways to Gain Work Experience
LinkedIn
candidates at hiring fair table

Most employers want to hire people with experience. But how do you get experience if you can’t get hired? It’s a classic bind.

One solution is to volunteer or do other unpaid work. You’ll gain skills and practical experiences. You’ll also gain references and a better understanding of your work preferences and talents. And all of those will improve your chances of getting hired.

Here are five types of unpaid (usually—sometimes you can get paid) work experiences:
 

Volunteer work

To volunteer actually means to work without being paid. There are opportunities to volunteer in every community, typically at nonprofit organizations and schools. You can gain skills like writing, childcare, teaching, coaching, fundraising, mentoring, sales, phone answering, organizing materials, construction, arts, and much more. Many organizations provide training to volunteer positions.

Get started by thinking about organizations you’d like to support. You can also search the Business Finder for businesses and non-profits in your area. Check organizations’ websites for volunteer opportunities,or call or email them directly.

Internship

An internship is a short-term job that can be paid or unpaid and gives students or job seekers experience in a real-world work environment. Usually if an internship is unpaid, it does provide some college or classroom credit. Internships are available in government, private businesses, and non-profit organizations. Interns, unlike volunteers, usually have a specific mentor or co-worker who helps them navigate the experience.

Apply for an internship through a college or high school internship office, by using an internship finder service, or by contacting the human resources office of a business directly. You can also use the Business Finder to locate companies and search their websites—or contact them directly—for internship opportunities.

Apprenticeship

Apprenticeships combine a full-time job with training—and prepare workers to enter in-demand careers. They are formal programs designed to provide affordable pathways to high-paying jobs and careers without the typical student debt associated with college. Apprenticeship opportunities are typically available in industries such as information technology, finance and business, healthcare, hospitality, transportation, and manufacturing.

To find apprenticeship opportunities that match your interests and skills, visit the new Apprenticeship Finder on Apprenticeship.gov—a one-stop source to connect career seekers, employers, and education partners with apprenticeship resources.

Job shadowing

Ranging from a few hours to a few days, job shadowing allows you to learn about the real, day-to-day work of an occupation by following someone as they work. You can arrange a shadow experience by asking to observe someone you know through your network, or requesting a contact through a professional association or school program. Read accounts of job shadow experiences.

School and community activities

You gain skills when you participate in clubs, sports, theatre, music, dance, parent organizations, religious affiliations, and other community activities. Include these on your resume. To develop skills in a specific area, join a group involved in that field. Find opportunities through school districts, community education, local arts groups, religious organizations, and the public library.

Source: Career One Stop

It’s 2023—Do You Still Need a Cover Letter?
LinkedIn
cover letter hown on desktop

If you’re job searching, you may notice that some postings or online applications don’t require that you send a cover letter. You may have even heard that in today’s job market, overwhelmed hiring managers have no time to read through cover letters. So, do you still need to send one with your resume or application?

The short answer is yes. You should send a cover letter. For one thing, a well-crafted cover letter is your best chance to stand out from other applicants. It gives you a chance to add some color to your resume and highlight both your achievements and why you’re a great fit for the position. Experts agree that if you have an opportunity, you should still attach a cover letter. In fact, ResumeLab recently surveyed employers and found that 83% of hiring managers said that a great cover letter can actually help you get an interview, even if your resume doesn’t match all the job requirements.

It’s true that some employers don’t ask for a cover letter when you apply. But it’s still a chance for you to demonstrate extra effort (which can signal extra interest to employers). If a job posting asks that you email your resume, you don’t need to attach a separate cover letter, but you can use the body of the email to highlight your unique qualifications for the job—basically you can format the email as a cover letter.

If you’re applying for a job through an online application, adding a cover letter might be marked as an “optional” step. But even if it’s not required, it’s wise to include one.

The good news is that cover letters don’t have to be as long as they were just a few years ago. Today, most experts recommend that your cover letter is between 200-400 words, with just 3-4

paragraphs. But don’t use the same one for each job. You need to write a targeted letter for each position.

Think about including these main sections in your cover letter:

Heading and greeting. Include the date, your name and your contact information, including phone and email. Address the letter to a specific person whenever possible. If you can’t find an individual’s name, use the job title of the recipient (Maintenance Supervisor, Office Manager), or perhaps “Human Resources” or “Search Committee.” Do not address your letter to a business, a department or “To Whom It May Concern.”

Brief introduction. Explain who you are and your reason for writing, including how you found out about the position. Use the first paragraph to express your energy, enthusiasm, skills, education and work experience that could contribute to the employer’s success.

Your highlights. Sell yourself. Reveal why you are a perfect and unique match for the position. Explain why you have chosen the employer. Briefly summarize your talents, experience and achievements.

Assertive closing. Thank the person for taking the time to read your letter. Use an appropriate closing, such as “Sincerely” and tell the employer how you plan to follow-up.

Source: CareerOneStop

The Hottest Remote Jobs of 2023
LinkedIn
black man tying on computer keyboard

Especially after the events of the COVID-19 pandemic, remote work is flourishing now more than ever. Whether you need to work from home for accessibility and comfort’s sake or you simply prefer to stay at home as opposed to going to an office, here are the top remote job opportunities you should consider:

Copywriter

If you have a knack for writing and marketing, then a career in copywriting may be for you. As a copywriter, you would be responsible for preparing advertisements to promote the sales of goods and services. Copywriters may work through agencies, in-house for a specific company, or through freelancing. They often work directly with a brand or company to develop company slogans, print advertisements, mailing services, social media posts, marketing communications, billboards, jingles and more.

  • Average Salary: $60,748
  • Education: Bachelor’s degree in writing, communication, marketing or a similar degree is recommended but not required. Most training can be done on the job and through experience.
  • Skillset: Writing, editing, organization, research, effective communication
  • Highest Paid Specialties: User Experience (UX) Copywriter, Travel Copywriter, Senior Pharmaceutical Copywriter, Fintech Copywriter

Social Media Managers

For those who have a knack for social media, you could be the perfect candidate for managing a business’s online presence. Social media managers are in charge of running their employers’ social media accounts and increasing their brand reputation. They create and post content, interact with the public as a brand representative, and ensure media posts are being discovered and interacted with.

  • Average Salary: $54,360
  • Education: Bachelor’s degree in public relations, communications, marketing or business is recommended.
  • Skillset: Knowledge of social media platforms, marketing, technology, public relations, creativity, communication
  • Highest Paid Specialties: Social Media Sr. Strategy Manager, Director of Social Media Strategy, Senior Social Media Analyst

Business Development Managers

Do you want to help a business to reach its full potential? Business development managers are in charge of enhancing a business’s success through client recruitment and relations. They are responsible for creating a business plan that a company can use to enhance its recruitment and retention methods and work in just about any industry.

  • Average Salary: $70,503
  • Education: Bachelor’s in business, communications or social sciences is recommended but not required. Master’s degrees may be preferable for higher-level positions.
  • Skillset: Business, customer relations, leadership, organization, collaboration
  • Highest Paid Specialties: VP/SVP of Sales and Business Development, International Business Development Manager, Technical Development Manager

Front End Developer

As a front-end developer, you would not only be a part of one of the fastest in-demand fields in the job circuit but in a position that is famous for its remote capabilities. As a front-end developer, you would be responsible for web development’s technical features and visual aspects. Front-end developers work to develop a website’s layout and graphics, convert files into HTML and JavaScript programs, and create website applications. Most of their work can be done remotely and in various fields.

  • Average Salary: $97,148
  • Education: Training in HTML and computer programming. A bachelor’s degree in programming or computer science can be preferable but is not required.
  • Skillset: Programming, multimedia tool knowledge, creativity, detail-oriented, communication
  • Highest Paid Specialties: Front End Architect, Front End Engineer

Curriculum Designer

Teaching the next generation is critical, and curriculum designers can ensure they receive a well-rounded education. Also known as instructional designers, curriculum designers are responsible for creating educational materials teachers and institutions use to teach students. They create the material and ensure it is implemented effectively, edited when necessary, and fulfills educational standards. They also write syllabi and create online learning course content.

  • Average Salary: $66,800
  • Education: Master’s degree in education or curriculum and instruction. Licensing may also be required depending on the workplace.
  • Skillset: Writing, educational background, communication, analytics, interpersonal skills
  • Highest Paid Specialties: Instructional Designer, Senior Service Designer, E&I Designer

Sources: Flexjobs, ZipRecruiter, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Wikipedia

Black Artists Encouraged to Apply For Global Musicians Partnership Program
LinkedIn
performers on stage raising hands together for fianl bow to audience

Kansas City is the first and only UNESCO Creative City of Music in the United States. Established in 2017, Creative City KC, Inc. is a not-for-profit and the focal point organization for the nation’s membership in the UNESCO Creative Cities Network (UCCN). On Wednesday, April 12, 2023, Creative City KC will present its annual meeting and give details about the benefits of accessing this worldwide platform.

The prestigious designation was authored by Anita Dixon-Brown, Founder and Executive Director of Creative City KC Inc. She comments, “Kansas City is internationally recognized as one of the four major development cities for the genre of Jazz. This history won us the designation. Charlie Parker, Count Basie, and SWING made us stand out. As the only UNESCO Creative City of Music in the United States, we are opening opportunities for musicians to expand their reach, travel, record, and perform across the world through this vast network.”

With culture at the forefront of these partnerships, Creative City KC Inc., aims to propel musicians into accessing the power of connecting with others globally. “We advocate for the advancement of UNESCO and UCCN core values, 17 Sustainable Development Goals, Peace through Music, International Cooperation through Creativity, and work to advance the African Diaspora in Kansas City and around the world,” said Dr. Jacob Wagner, Professor of Urban Planning & Design at the University of Missouri – Kansas City, and co-founder of the designation.

An email of interest to [email protected] is sufficient to begin the process of becoming a Partner with UNESCO Creative City of Music-USA. They will then send you a short, online survey to request additional information about the nature of your project or partnership.

About the founder
Anita Dixon-Brown has been a Cultural Heritage Consultant for over 30 years, developing tours of historic sites for African Americans nationally, consulting on major heritage projects such as preserving the sites of the Underground Railroad in American history, and demonstrating heritage tourism as a major economic tool for urban community sustainability. For more details about her, visit SageWorldView.com

Source: BlackNews.com

‘Quiet’ is the workplace word of 2023
LinkedIn
Young black man using his laptop keeping a secret or asking for silence

By , Business Insider

It seems fair to say that “quiet” is the workplace word for this year. “Quiet quitting,” “quiet hiring,” and “quiet firing” have all entered the work lexicon in the last several months, each marking a trend in how workers and employers are continuing to adapt to changes in how work works three years after the start of the pandemic. Experts think those “quiet” trends and more are set to continue throughout 2023 and beyond.

While not everything in today’s workplace are related to these quiet terms — there’s also rage applying, career cushioning, and chaotic working to name a few — there are a lot of quiet trends happening at work.

Quiet hiring

According to Vicki Salemi, career expert for Monster, quiet hiring involves shuffling workers into new roles within a company and “happens when people internally are being asked to move to another area internally.”

“Quiet hiring” is one of the “biggest workplace buzzwords” of 2023 per Insider’s reporting. That’s based on Gartner research, which considered it one of nine “Future of Work Trends for 2023.”

Emily Rose McRae of Gartner’s HR Practice said per reporting from GMA that quiet hiring is a workplace trend in 2023 in part because of a shortage in talent.

“We do not have enough talent for the roles that are available,” McRae said. “The jobs report that just came out said we had the lowest number of job seekers in months, so we’re not in a situation where we’re easily finding lots more talent.”

Salemi noted a few other reasons as to why quiet hiring may happen, including that it can be a strategy to get around having to lay off workers. She added that it could be the case too that “the company realizes that the employee’s talent are being underutilized.”

She pointed out that there can be pros to these internal moves like acquiring new skills, but some may find out they aren’t happy with this change. Salemi pointed out a Monster poll that half of those impacted by quiet hiring are in roles that actually don’t match their skills. This could lead to people joining the ongoing Great Resignation.

“Companies are redeploying resources and employees are — depending on their situation — it could be a move or stepping stone to a bigger opportunity or they could feel perhaps like they’re not in alignment with their goals,” Salemi said.

Quiet quitting

As Insider’s Samantha Delouya reported, “quiet quitting,” or just doing a minimum workload, was one prominent trend last year, and according to Payscale’s new 2023 Compensation Best Practices Report, it “isn’t going away.”

Today’s high inflation of over 6% may also be one reason people are not going above and beyond in their roles.

“In the midst of inflation, these employees who stayed, they’re being asked to take on more and more work for what feels like less pay if they haven’t got a raise or promotion,” Bonnie Chiurazzi, director of market insights at Glassdoor, told Insider. “So when you think of it through their eyes, it seems more of a natural response to the context that they’ve been living through.”

And layoffs, such as those at companies like Spotify and BlackRock, may not help this trend.

Amid those kinds of layoffs, “there is the likelihood that there’ll be increased responsibility for the employees that are left behind,” Ruth Thomas, pay equity strategist at Payscale, told Insider. “And that may potentially exacerbate that quiet quitting movement where employees become more frustrated at the fact that they’re having to take on more responsibility, so that’s a dynamic we see potentially happening.”

​​Salemi also said she thinks quiet quitting is still taking place in the labor market. Similarly, Chiurazzi thinks the “quiet quitting trend will persist until employers are ready to turn up the volume on employee feedback and really dig into these conversations.”

“I do think quiet quitting will remain prevalent until some of the underlying issues are addressed,” Chiurazzi said.

Chiurazzi pointed to Glassdoor findings that suggest some workers aren’t too happy with their employer. Chiurazzi said about a third “of employees feel a lack of transparency with their current employer,” but also about a third aren’t happy “with how their employer engages employees” and about a third are unhappy with “how their employers follow up on employee feedback.”

Other buzzwords of the year from Insider’s reporting relate to quiet quitting even if they don’t use the word quiet. That includes resenteeism, which Glamour UK’s Bianca London described as “the natural successor to ‘quiet quitting.'”

Another related buzzword of 2023 is Bare Minimum Monday — or as Insider’s Rebecca Knight and Tim Paradis wrote: “the TikTokian progeny of ‘quiet quitting.'” While this involves doing just the minimum on Mondays, it’s similar given quiet quitting includes not doing more than you are required to. However, not all buzzwords are about quiet things in the workplace. Newsweek reported that “loud layoffs” will be a trend this year, and Salemi told Insider “rage applying” is also happening usually because people want to leave “toxic workplaces.”

Quiet firing, thriving, and promotions

Quiet firing is another trend describing what has been taken place for some in the workplace. As Insider’s Britney Nguyen wrote, this quiet term means “employers treat workers badly to the point they will quit, instead of the employer just firing them.”

Continue on to Business Insider to read the complete article.

Kickstart Your Career With Public Health AmeriCorps
LinkedIn
MENTAL HEALTH open book on table and coffee Business

As communities across the country work to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic and build a healthier, more resilient future, there is an urgent need to grow our nation’s public health workforce.

Our communities also need innovative solutions to help break down barriers to good health and improve health equity. That’s why AmeriCorps and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are teaming up through Public Health AmeriCorps, a new program that supports the recruitment, training and development of a new generation of diverse public health leaders.

Opportunities Are Now Available Near You

AmeriCorps is recruiting thousands of people to serve in public health roles at health departments, government agencies, community-based organizations, schools and other settings across the U.S. Adults of all ages and educational backgrounds are eligible to join Public Health AmeriCorps, which aims to recruit members who reflect the communities where they serve.

“Public Health AmeriCorps members add much needed capacity and support for local organizations and help address critical public health issues — like health equity, mental health and substance use disorders, COVID-19 recovery and more,” said Michael D. Smith, AmeriCorps CEO. “This program will not only meet urgent public health needs, but also help fill the shortages in the public health workforce with thousands of Public Health AmeriCorps alumni who represent the rich diversity of the communities they serve.”

Depending on the organization’s and community’s needs, some common roles include:

  • Health education and training
  • Community outreach and engagement
  • System navigation, referrals and linkage to care
  • Research, data collection, analysis and assessment
  • And more!

For example, AmeriCorps members have helped more than 2.5 million people at COVID-19 vaccination sites and conducted 1.7 million wellness checks. Members have also served as recovery coaches to help individuals overcome opioid addiction by providing substance use prevention, education, screenings and assessments.

Why Serve with Public Health AmeriCorps?

For many AmeriCorps members, serving is a way to gain valuable, first-hand experience to help further or transition their careers. Members receive on-site experience in a public health setting and have access to a comprehensive training program. Serving is also a great way to help make a difference in communities and give back. In addition, members receive benefits including:

  • Professional development opportunities: Gain transferable skills employers value including leadership, teamwork and problem-solving.
  • Living allowance: Receive a living allowance to cover basic expenses during your service term.
  • Money for college and trade school: Individuals who complete a term of service will receive an education award which can be used for a range of educational expenses.
  • Loan deferment and interest forbearance: AmeriCorps members are eligible for forbearance for most federally guaranteed student loans. In addition, interest payments that accrue during service may be eligible for repayment by AmeriCorps.
  • Access to the national AmeriCorps alumni network: Be part of a network of like-minded leaders who are passionate about improving communities. AmeriCorps alumni receive access to unique benefits and resources.

Learn More & Apply

Is this a good fit for you? Visit AmeriCorps.gov/PublicHealth for a complete list of opportunities to serve and guidance on how to apply. Part-time and full-time roles are available in rural and urban locations across nearly every state, D.C., Guam and Puerto Rico. You can also subscribe to AmeriCorps’ newsletter (public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USCNCS/subscriber/new) and contact [email protected] with any questions.

The Woman Stepping Up to Take on Climate Change
LinkedIn
Monica Medina smiling wearing a blue suit with hair in bun

Environmental conservation is one of the biggest issues of the current times, bringing together representatives from every country to discuss what needs to be done to preserve our planet and its wildlife.

But thanks to one woman’s extraordinary expertise and her new position with the United Nations, we are improving worldwide efforts to help our planet.

Attorney and Army veteran, Monica Medina has been an advocate and a key player for sustainability and conservation efforts throughout her entire career.

She has worked as legal counsel on behalf of environmentalist organizations such as NOAA and the United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, oversaw the Justice Department’s Environmental Division under President Clinton, led conservation efforts as the Commissioner to the International Whaling Commission under President Obama and has worked with various other environmentalist and ecological organizations.

Now, Medina’s expertise will be utilized in a whole new way: as the United States’ first ever Special Envoy for Biodiversity and Water Resources; a position designed to confront the environmental crises that directly affect our planet’s wildlife and water supply. In tandem with her position as the assistant secretary for the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs at the state department, Medina’s position makes her one of the biggest power plays in environmental conservation among world leaders.

“I am really honored to have this role and this title,” she told ShareAmerica. “We’re in a world where the loss of nature is overwhelming and a real potential threat to the health of the planet and the health of people.”

In her new role, Medina will be working to support two of the most important ecological crises that effect humanity: the protection of biodiversity and increasing water security.

Decades of evidence shows that water security is essential to global efforts to increase equity and economic growth, build inclusive and resilient societies, bolster health and food security, decrease the risk of conflict or instability and tackle the climate crisis. Meanwhile, environmental stressors, like the climate crisis, nature crimes — including illegal logging, mining, land conversion — and wildlife trafficking, have deep and detrimental impacts on the biodiversity of our planet and the availability of clean and safe water for human use. The two crises are inextricably linked, and the state department and Special Envoy Medina are committed to addressing the crises holistically.

“These have deep and detrimental and lasting impacts on biodiversity, and on the availability of resources like clean and safe water,” Medina stated. “We are committed as we can be to try to address all of these crises at the same time.”

Monica Medina (L), speaks with Cho Seung-Hwan (R), South Korea's special presidential envoy for the 2030 Busan World Expo
Monica Medina (L), speaks with Cho Seung-Hwan (R), South Korea’s special presidential envoy for the 2030 Busan World Expo, during a meeting on the sidelines of the Pacific Islands Forum (PIF). (WILLIAM WEST/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

As part of Medina’s position, she has attended and will continue to attend discussions and negotiation that will foster new conservation efforts to support biodiversity and water preservation. These conferences include the 2022 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP27), the December meeting of the Convention on Biological Diversity Conference of Parties (COP15) and the Intergovernmental Conference. She will also be in charge of forming partnerships with other countries to find climate solutions.

“I am really honored to have this role and this title. We’re in a world where the loss of nature is overwhelming and a real potential threat to the health of the planet and the health of people.” – Monica Medina

Additionally, Medina’s position will require her to implement a first-of-its-kind initiative dedicated to advancing water security in the U.S. and abroad. The White House Water Security Action Plan and the Global Water Strategy, both of which Medina will be leading, will identify the direct links between water and U.S. national security, and harness the resources of the U.S. government — from leveraging science and technology to informing our diplomacy, defense and development efforts — to advance global water security and foreign policy goals. Securing water safety is additionally believed to prevent conflict and promote global peace and stability.

Monica Medina makes a few remarks at a special preview screening of the Netflix film, “Mission Blue,” at the National Geographic Society's Grosvenor Auditorium in Washington, D.C.
Monica Medina makes a few remarks at a special preview screening of the Netflix film, “Mission Blue,” at the National Geographic Society’s Grosvenor Auditorium in Washington, D.C. (Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Netflix)

“We see water scarcity as a growing threat to peace and security in so many parts of the world, so we made it a priority,” Medina said.

Though climate change has been one of the top growing concerns for people of differing citizenships, political beliefs and cultures, Medina has faith that these new partnerships and programs will have a positive impact on the future of ecological conservation. “We are working to advance our climate ambition, to strengthen resilience to climate change and to really get as strong an outcome as possible from COP27. We as the U.S., are bringing an awful lot to the table there.”

Sources: ShareAmerica, U.S. Department of State, whitehouse.gov, Wikipedia

Top Photo: Monica Medina, assistant secretary for the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs of the United States, poses for a picture during an interview with AFP on the sidelines of the UN’s first session of the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee (INC-1) to develop a legally binding instrument on plastic pollution on November 28, 2022. (RICARDO FIGUEREDO/AFP via Getty Images)

Searching for a Remote Job? 5 Mistakes to Avoid
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By Jillian Hamilton

Remote jobs are a hot search term — even in national security. But while many say they want to work from home some or all of the time, it doesn’t mean candidates know how to find a remote job.

The candidate market may be hot, but that doesn’t mean that it’s easy to find the right job that fits you.

5 MISTAKES TO AVOID IN YOUR REMOTE JOB SEARCH

But if you’re in the market for a remote job and not finding one, you might be making some basic mistakes. Sometimes, you don’t have to overhaul everything — just make a few adjustments.
 

  1. Focusing only on the remote-side of the search.

When it comes to jobs, it’s really about lining up the right skills to the position. It may be tempting to apply for every and any remote job, regardless of whether or not you even want to do the actual work. However, if you want to go remote in national security, your best bet will be to keep your job search open to all requirements and focus on your specific skillsets. You may find that in a candidate market, cleared employers are willing to offer some hybrid options. You can narrow your search for specific remote jobs, but it’s important to keep your skillsets the key piece of the equation. Employers are most concerned with finding cleared candidates who meet the job requirements.

  1. Never changing your resume for the different jobs.

This isn’t a remote-only issue. It is a normal struggle for candidates, but it’s worth mentioning because it can have such a negative impact on the success of a job search. If you’re not adjusting your resume based on each job description, make that your first change you make. If you want the job, you have to connect the dots for recruiters, highlighting how your skillsets map to the job requirements. Don’t just blast your resume out to every opportunity without making adjustments.

  1. Searching remote jobs outside your geographical location.

When it comes to cleared, remote opportunities, the odds of having to make an appearance at the office or the client site are high. Unless the contract allows for billable travel, you will need to be close enough to commute in, sometimes at least once a week. Unless you have a personal SCIF at home or the contract has zero classified information that you will have to handle, then you should expect some in-person interactions will need to happen. Try narrowing down your search to opportunities that are at least a drivable distance from your home.

  1. Forgetting your network.

You build your network for many reasons, but one of the best times to lean on them is when you are job searching. Whether it’s to ask someone to review your resume or it’s to connect to a company that has remote openings, you have to remember to reach out. Asking for help isn’t easy for everyone, but every job search is made better when your network is involved. Don’t forget to reach out to recruiters as part of your network, as well as key associations in the industry. Those connections could be your ticket to answering emails in your comfy pants at home.

  1. Skipping your remote skills section.

You might not think this section is important, but you’d be wrong. If you want to have a remote job, you have to highlight how you are suited to it. Not everyone thrives or has the right skills to make the remote life work for them. Team communications and collaboration skills in a remote world need to be highlighted. How are you at tracking tasks? Don’t talk about how much easier working at home makes your personal and professional life. That shouldn’t be your reasoning for an employer to offer you a remote job. If you really want to land your next remote gig, you need to highlight on your resume your remote skills, as well as share that information during the interview too.

BE FLEXIBLE WITH REMOTE DEMANDS

Sometimes in national security, the remote jobs just aren’t there. But be sure that it’s because all the contracts are actually requiring 100 percent on-site support and not because you’re making some key mistakes in your remote job search. And you may need to be flexible on the amount of cleared remote work you can get. With federal agency offices opening back up, mask guidelines being adjusted and vaccine mandates on hold, more clients will be expecting more faces on-site. Being able to support the mission with a hybrid schedule is a win for the national security workforce.

Source: ClearanceJobs

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Upcoming Events

  1. City Career Fairs Schedule for 2023
    September 27, 2023 - January 23, 2024
  2. Small Business Expo 2023 Business Networking & Educational Events Schedule
    September 27, 2023 - June 6, 2024
  3. 2023 Global ERG Network Conference
    October 11, 2023 - October 13, 2023
  4. 2023 Global ERG Network Conference
    October 11, 2023 - October 13, 2023
  5. STEAM Symposium
    February 9, 2024 - February 10, 2024
  6. Save The Date for #NSBE50!
    February 28, 2024 - March 3, 2024