News From Our Partners

HACU’s virtual Town Hall to focus on the 2020 Presidential Election: Its Impact on Latinos and Hispanic Higher Education, Oct. 28

The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities will present a Town Hall on “The 2020 Presidential Election: Its Impact on Latinos and Hispanic Higher Education,” Oct. 28, 2020, 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. PT /4:30 – 5:30 p.m. CT /5:30 – 6:30 p.m. ET. The Town Hall is part of its 34th Annual Conference, being offered virtually under the theme, “Championing Hispanic Higher Education: Fostering Excellence and Social Justice,” Oct. 26-28.

The Town Hall will feature a panel of experts who will discuss the 2020 presidential election, and where each candidate stands on key issues, particularly education, and how their policies would impact Latinos in the U.S. The panelists will also analyze the decisions made by the elected candidates regarding elementary, secondary, and higher education and their impact on Hispanic-Serving Institutions, specifically, and the nearly 20 million college students enrolled in higher education nationwide.

The Town Hall will be moderated by Adela de la Torre, Ph.D., president, San Diego State University. Speakers will include: Sonja Diaz, Esq., executive director, University of California Los Angeles, Latino Policy & Politics Initiative; Ted Mitchell, Ph.D., president, American Council on Education; and Mark Hugo Lopez, Ph.D., director, Global Migration and Demography Research, Pew Research Center.

HACU’s premier conference on Hispanic higher education provides a unique forum for the sharing of information and ideas for the best and most promising practices in the education of Hispanics and promotes and expands partnerships and strategic alliances for collaboration between HACU-member institutions and public- and private-sector organizations.

Registration for HACU’s 34th Annual Conference and pre- and post-conference events is available here.


American Indian College Fund Announces 2020-21 Student Ambassador Cohort

The American Indian College Fund selected and trained 12 new student ambassadors for its 2020 cohort. Now in its sixth year, the College Fund Student Ambassador Program trains American Indian and Alaska Native students to serve as leaders in their communities, to work to combat stereotypes, and to create greater visibility of Native Americans and an understanding of the importance of their diverse cultures.

With 42% of the Native American population today under the age of 24, the opportunity to educate the next generation of young Native leaders to realize their potential and to advocate for their communities is at a tipping point. Creating greater visibility about the importance of higher education for Native students is crucial to creating a better future for Native peoples and communities. College Fund student ambassadors promote higher education and visibility of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN) and inspiring the next generation of Native students in media interviews, at cultural events, in their communities, and on their campuses.

The 2020 cohort also received advocacy training to help them spearhead engagement and action for issues impacting Native communities.

This year the multi-day training program was moved online, still providing student ambassadors with leadership development, public speaking, interviewing, writing, and social media training in an interactive modular format.

The virtual format allowed attendees the additional opportunity to participate in conversations about career planning and persistence with professionals in their fields. Special guests included veteran Native American actor Zahn McClarnon (recent credits include television shows Barkskins, Longmire, Fargo, and Westworld and the movie Dr. Sleep) who was joined by his mother, a longtime professional educator; and Kevin McDermott, a retired NFL long snapper who played for the San Francisco 49ers, Denver Broncos, Baltimore Ravens, and Minnesota Vikings before leaving the NFL to launch his dream career in finance.

The 2020-21 American Indian College Fund Student Ambassadors are:

  • Lyndsey Blanco (Tlingit and Haida Central Council), a business administration major at Ilisagvik College in Alaska;
  • Kimberly Blevins (Mandan Hidatsa Arikara Nation), an environmental science master’s program student at Sitting Bull College in North Dakota;
  • Natasha Goldtooth (Diné), an agroecology/environmental science major at Diné College in Arizona;
  • Spring Grey Bear (Standing Rock Sioux Tribe), a business administration major at United Tribes Technical College in North Dakota;
  • Kenwa Kravitz (Pit River/Wintu), a native studies leadership major at Northwest Indian College in Washington;
  • Emily Lockling (Fond du Lac Band of Superior Chippewa), an environmental science major at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College in Minnesota;
  • Jacob McArthur (White Earth Ojibwe Nation), a business administration major at Bemidji State University in Minnesota;
  • Tori McConnell (Yurok Tribe), a neurology, physiology, and behavior major at the University of California Davis in California;
  • Jamison Nessman (White Earth Nation), a pre-medicine student at Bemidji State University in Minnesota;
  • Chandra Norton (Hoopa Vakkey Tribe), a community advocate and responsive education in human services major at Northwest Indian College in Washington;
  • David Plant (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes), a business management major at Salish Kootenai College in Montana.
  • Amanda Ruiz (Sicangu Lakota), a natural science degree and pre-engineering major at Oglala Lakota College in South Dakota;
  • Christopher Villaruel (Ajumawi/Pit River), a Forestry Hydrology Major at Humbodlt State University in California;
  • Lester Wells (Crow Creek Sioux Tribe), a Lakota leadership and management master’s program major with an education administration emphasis at Oglala Lakota College in South Dakota; and
  • Jade Yazzie (Diné), a food and nutrition in dietetics major at Montana State University in Montana.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Keynote Lineup for VIRTUAL Commercial UAV Expo Americas 2020 includes Leaders from FAA, CISA and The White house

Steve Dickson, Administrator, FAA; Brian Harrell, Assistant Director, DHS Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA); and Michael Kratsios, Chief Technology Officer of the United States, The White House, will deliver keynote presentations at Commercial UAV Expo Americas 2020 Virtual Event taking place September 15-17.  Additional keynote panels are Drone Delivery in the Era of a Pandemic; UPS Panel on Building a Drone Delivery Airline While Balancing the Gender Equation; and Expanded Operations, Regulatory Update and Lessons Learned from IPP.

For the first time, Keynotes will be free to attend for anyone with Virtual Exhibit Hall pass. In addition to accessing the keynotes, attendees will be able to chat with one another during the sessions and network with one another through a sophisticated AI-powered networking tool. Registration is available here: https://virtual.expouav.com/page/1554247/register?promo=209221

“The need to come together has never been greater,” said Lisa Murray, Event Director. “We’re thrilled that these top UAS leaders have chosen Commercial UAV Expo as the platform for sharing critical updates and information during these extraordinary times.”

Keynote Presentations

Steve Dickson, FAA
UAS Today and Onward

Over the past year, the industry and the FAA have made substantial progress related to UAS. Operators have received part 135 air carrier certification, the long-awaited remote identification rule was proposed and will soon be finalized, aircraft type certification efforts are underway, and emergency relief and public safety operations have expanded. But where is the FAA really on the path to full integration? This journey began and is progressing deliberately, with an absolute commitment to safety every step of the way. As technology has advanced; experience has been gained through real-world operations, such as those conducted under the UAS Integration Pilot Program. Regulatory efforts have progressed bringing the destination closer every day. In this keynote address, FAA Administrator Steve Dickson will discuss the state of UAS, today and in the future.

Brian Harrell, CISA
Security Threats & Opportunities; DHS CISA Resources for Commercial Enterprises

“Private industry does not own the airspace above generation facilities, above a transmission substation, above a water plant — so the overhead threat for attack is absolutely real today.”—Brian Harrell. In his Keynote address, Brian will provide an update on joint efforts of DHS, DOJ, HHS and other agencies to anticipate and mitigate threats, the risks posed by—and opportunities for use of – unmanned systems, the importance of investing in an insider-threat and other crisis mitigation programs, and resources available for industry including free workshops, training and webinars through the DHS CISA. The goal is protecting key infrastructure and other assets including the electric grid and water resources and preparing for worst-case scenarios.

Michael Kratsios, The White House
Update from the White House

As President Trump’s top technology advisor, Michael has led the development and execution of the Administration’s national technology policy agenda since inauguration. Under his leadership, the White House launched National initiatives for artificial intelligence, quantum computing, 5G and broadband communications, autonomous vehicles, commercial drones, STEM education, and advanced manufacturing. Chief Michael will provide an update on the latest developments from the White House.

Keynote Panels

In addition to the Keynote Presentations, the program includes three Keynote panels:

Drone Delivery in the Era of a Pandemic

The successes of drones deliveries for sending medicine and organs to hospitals quickly, or delivering aid in disaster areas, has not only been a step forward for proof of concept, but the PR engendered has been an important boost for the drone industry. How have deliveries been progressing, particularly throughout the pandemic, and what are next steps toward expanding these programs for other types of package delivery via drone?

Panelists include Lisa Ellman, Commercial Drone Alliance & Partner, Hogan Lovells, (Moderator); Bala Ganesh, UPS; Ed De Reyes, Sabrewing Aircraft Company, Inc with additional speaker announcements to come.

Building a Drone Delivery Airline While Balancing the Gender Equation

The UPS Flight Forward team is comprised of women leaders. In this inspiring Keynote they’ll share not only the new technologies being deployed and integration into the existing UPS airline fleet, but also their experiences as they’ve been actively balancing the gender equation. Speaker announcements coming soon.

Expanded Operations, Regulatory Update and Lessons Learned from IPP

Jay Merkle will kick off the session with a regulatory update and will then engage panelists in candid discussion about their IPP experiences. He’ll focus on how these learnings and insights will inform the expansion of drone programs.

Panelists include Jay Merkle, FAA (Moderator); Katelyn McCauley, San Diego IPP; Cathy Cahill, University of Alaska IPP; Mark Blanks, Virginia IPP; James Grimsley, Advanced Technology Initiatives, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma.

About Commercial UAV Expo Americas

Commercial UAV Expo Americas, presented by Commercial UAV News, is the leading international trade show and conference for the commercial drone market. Its sixth edition, September 15-17, 2020 will take place virtually. For more information, visit www.expouav.com/.

Commercial UAV Expo Americas and its sister event Commercial UAV Expo Europe are produced by Diversified Communications’ technology portfolio which also includes Commercial UAV News, GeoBusiness Show, International Lidar Technology Forum, SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, SPAR 3D.com, AECNext Technology Expo & Conference and AEC Next News. For information on opportunities for vendors at Commercial UAV Expo Americas, contact Katherine Dow, Sales Manager, at kdow@divcom.com or +1.207-842-5497. For attending information, visit www.expouav.com or email info@expouav.com.

Trans and non-binary people in STEM: Apply for a Ben Barres Fellowship, deadline 9/30/2020

NOGLSTP is proud to offer the Ben Barres Fellowship. The fellowship is a $2000-$5000 award for professional development of trans, intersex, and non-binary graduate students and post-doctoral fellows in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

The Ben Barres Fellowship is a merit-based award, and the support provided is intended, broadly construed, for the recipient’s professional development. Examples of eligible purposes include research support; conference/workshop attendance, or research travel; equipment/supplies; research assistant or translation services; and/or other professional uses. The fund is not intended to support personal expenses unrelated to research, such as food or rent.

To apply for The Ben Barres Fellowship, applicants will provide a brief description of their current research and research/career goals, a 2-3 paragraph funding proposal, a personal statement, their CV, and answers to demographics questions. Each application must have one letter of support, which may be written by any of the following: PI, Mentor, Advisor, or Colleague. The letter of support will be submitted by the recommender (not the applicant). Applications will be evaluated on clarity of written proposal, impact of proposed funding on applicant’s career, contributions to STEM and LGBTQ+ communities, and strength of support letter. If awarded funds, the recipient will upload a brief report and expense receipts within 6 months of receiving the award.

Apply here: https://www.noglstp.org/programs-projects/ben-barres-fellowship/

Recipients of the fellowship will retain the option of remaining anonymous in public announcements of the award. Alternatively, they may choose to be publicly acknowledged in NOGLSTP’s publicity campaigns. Awards will range from $2000 to $5000 per recipient. Application deadline for the first round of awards is September 30,2020. Award decisions will be announced the first week of December. If any money is left, there will be additional rounds of awards until all the money has been awarded.

About NOGLSTP

NOGLSTP was established in 1980, incorporated in the State of California in 1991, and was granted IRS 501 (c) 3 non-profit status in 1992. NOGLSTP’s mission is to educate the scientific and general communities about the presence and accomplishments of LGBT individuals in STEM professions. NOGLSTP presents educational symposia and workshops nationwide. NOGLSTP fosters dialog with other professional societies, academia, and industry to facilitate diversity and inclusion in the workplace. NOGLSTP is an affiliate of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, is a participating professional society member of MentorNet®, a sustaining member of the National Postdoctoral Association, a partner with the Higher Education Recruitment Consortium (HERC) and a founding member of the E-Week Diversity Council.

For more information, visit the website at www.noglstp.org


Cheryl Crazy Bull, President of American Indian College Fund, Receives Legacy Award from Working Mother Media

Denver, Colo.—July 30, 2020– Working Mother Media presented Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund President, with its Legacy Award on Wednesday, July 22, during its Multicultural Women’s Conference, which was hosted virtually due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Working Mother Media established the Legacy Award in 2005 to honor one extraordinary individual for her inspiration, dedication, and contributions to the advancement of multicultural women in the workplace and beyond. In particular, the organization honors women from public and non-profit sectors for their outstanding work that creates opportunity and well-being on many levels for women, girls, and communities. Cheryl Crazy Bull was selected for the award because of her extensive experience with the tribal college movement and her tireless work in supporting Native student success and education. Her long history of education, activism, and community growth has been documented and exemplary, and has created a lasting legacy built on advancing Native voices that will continue far into the future.

Subha V. Barry, President, Working Mother Media, said, “This award acknowledges the incredible and courageous women who are out there in the field doing the hard work and making a difference, being mentors, leaders and examples to others—and who are creating a legacy and vision for future women.”

Cheryl_Crazy_BullCheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “Receiving this award is an honor that goes beyond me. It is an award that I accept on behalf of all indigenous women who want to be seen, those who have gone into the spirit world who we must remember, those who are here now and need our support, and those who are coming who need our seventh generation vision. Many of our Tribal nations survived because women adapted to the new world, kept our traditions alive, and passed our knowledge to our children. I want to recognize my colleagues at the American Indian College Fund, and especially to honor the women of the tribal college movement today, the women who helped found our tribal colleges and universities and who served and serve as presidents and as faculty and staff, the women who are our students.”

According to the Working Mother Research Institute’s “On the Verge” study, 50% of multicultural working women considered leaving their companies within a year. On top of bias and lack of support, multicultural women are also disproportionately impacted socio-economically, and struggle with building strategic relationship capital that would elevate their careers. During the pandemic, multicultural women are faced with even greater challenges than before.

The Multicultural Women’s Conference gives working women the tools needed to lead effectively in trying times. While studies show that women of color bring higher levels of education, ambition, and diverse ideas to the workplace, the conference tasked organizations and individuals to explore ways to ensure talented multicultural women stay engaged and connected while being inclusive and helping them to build networks, new skills, and cultural leadership competencies in today’s environment.

About Working Mother Media— Working Mother Media’s (WMM) mission is to serve as a champion of culture change. WMM publishes Working Mother magazine and its companion website, workingmother.com, which is the only national magazine for career-committed mothers. WMM also produces 20-plus events dedicated to the advancement of women, work and life, and helping organizations build inclusive workplace cultures.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

Photo: Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO, American Indian College Fund


American Indian College Fund Awarded $50,000 Rise Prize

The American Indian College Fund was awarded a $50,000 Rise Prize to create both a higher education cohort of Native student mothers and programming that is responsive to their unique needs as college students. The program will be called Ina Wa Wounspe Pi,” Lakota for Mothers Who Are Learning.

The “Rise Prize” is a collective effort between Imaginative Futures, the Lumina Foundation and ten partner organizations focused on the success of parent students in higher education. Organizations based in the United States of any age, size, or type that are currently working on direct impact initiatives for student parents and other students, including high education institutions, for-profit companies, and non-profit organizations like the American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) were eligible to apply for the competitive prize.

The College Fund was one of eight of 383 applicants that was chosen to receive $50,000 for their efforts programming efforts in working with student parents.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “On behalf of the College Fund, I appreciate the opportunity through the Rise Prize to focus resources on supporting student mothers. While all parents and guardians are valued by us, we welcome resources to help mothers pursue their educational dreams. They inspire us and with coaching and programs directed at their success, we look forward to their bright futures.”

With the Rise Prize, the American Indian College Fund will be collecting data on the cohort’s outcomes to examine other cohorts that can be created to meet student coaching needs.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

 

American Indian College Fund Statement: Re-Name Mascots to End Harmful Stereotypes

#TheTimeIsNow for racist sports team names and mascots to be renamed. The American Indian College Fund appreciates its long-time mission supporters, FedEx, Nike, and Walmart. They have chosen to stand alongside indigenous groups across the United States to amplify our voices and to call upon the Washington NFL team to change its name. We are proud to call you our allies.

Indigenous people are a vibrant part of both our nation’s history and modern-day America. Eliminating mascots that reinforce harmful stereotypes sends a powerful message to our children that we value all histories, cultures, and perspectives, helping to foster confidence, growth, and success from kindergarten to college graduation and to build a better future for all. #ChangeTheName. #NotYourMascot.

Cheryl_Crazy_BullCheryl Crazy Bull
President and CEO, American Indian College Fund

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


AT&T Contributes $350K to American Indian College Fund

Charity Offering Native Student Scholarships and College Readiness Programs to Increase Number of Native Americans With A Higher Education

Denver, Colo., June 30, 2020—COVID-19 had a more devastating impact on Native American communities than others. Because only 14% of American Indians and Alaska Natives have a college degree—less than half of that of other groups, the American Indian College Fund was understandably worried about the impact of the virus on students entering college for the first time in the fall and the persistence of those already in college. Thanks to the continued support of AT&T with a $350,000 contribution to the American Indian College Fund’s Braided Success: Fostering Native Student Success from High School to College and Career program, high school and college students in the Tohono O’odham Community College in Sells, Arizona and College of Muscogee Nation in Okmulgee, Oklahoma communities continued and will continue to be supported in their quest for a higher education.

The American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) created two interlocking programs with the grant to increase Native student access to higher education and success.

Braiding Support will provide $100,000 in scholarship support over the period of one year to American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) students from Oklahoma and Arizona seeking to attend a tribal college (TCU) or mainstream institution located in their home states.

Braiding Success will develop partnerships between the Tohono O’oodham Community College (Sells, Ariz.) and the College of Muscogee Nation (Okmulgee, Okla.) and the local high schools serving their tribal communities, and employers.

In the first three years of the program, the College of Muscogee Nation partnered with three local high schools and offered three dual enrollment programs. Of the 157 Native high school student participants, 33% took college courses through the dual-enrollment program. Participants also enjoyed college visits.

Similarly, TOCC partnered with two local high schools to launch its S.T.A.R.T. program—Students Thriving, Achieving, and Rising Together. Thirty-eight percent of all partner high school students are served by S.T.A.R.T., and of that number, 42% of the students participated in the dual-enrollment program with TOCC. Students also enjoyed after-school programs and tutoring sessions.

The result was that students who participated in the TCU’s programs graduated from high school at rates more than 20% higher than Native Americans nationally.

By continuing the strong relationships forged between college the high schools and TCUs, the Braiding Success initiative also better prepares students who transition to college for an easier transition to higher education and employment.

Program managers at the TCUs are looking at ways to navigate the landscape with COVID-19, ensuring that students continue to have access to the program opportunities in a safe way to maintain the health of Native students and their communities. Program activities include college and career fairs, sponsored visits to employers to explore career opportunities with working professionals in students’ fields of interest and integrating coaching for student’s college and career success.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “AT&T is on the leading edge of engaging best practices supporting career pathways for indigenous students through its support of the College Fund’s student success programming. This partnership builds on our shared vision of helping students achieve their dreams.”

“AT&T has a long history of supporting initiatives that help Native American students graduate from high school and succeed in college and career,” said Tom Brooks, vice president of external affairs, AT&T. “We’re proud to further our commitment to Native communities with this contribution and connect Native youth to educational pathways that lead to careers in the 21st century workforce.”

About Philanthropy & Social Innovation at AT&T — AT&T Inc. is committed to advancing education, strengthening communities and improving lives. We have a long history of investing in projects that create learning opportunities, promote academic and economic achievement, and address community needs. Our AT&T Aspire initiative uses innovation in education to drive student success in school and beyond. With a financial commitment of $550 million since 2008, AT&T is leveraging technology, relationships and social innovation to help all students make their biggest dreams a reality.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $208 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


 

Henry Luce Foundation Grants $250,000 to American Indian College Fund to Assist Tribal College Faculty with Remote Instruction During Covid-19 Crisis

The Henry Luce Foundation granted the American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) $250,000 to provide faculty at tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) with the technology and support they need to make the transition to remote instruction during the Covid-19 crisis. TCUs are located on or near Indian reservations primarily in rural communities serving predominately Native American populations. It is not just Native students but entire Native communities, faculty included, that often lack the technological tools and resources to make the transition to on-line learning.

As the virus outbreak impacted Native communities, the American Indian College Fund was concerned that it has the potential to reverse education attainment. Yet now more than ever educated citizens are needed as health care workers, social workers, teachers, and more.

TCUs are geographically and culturally diverse that share common goals such as integrating cultural values and connection to land into curriculum and pedagogy while emphasizing community outreach and education rooted in tribal identity and practice. In 2017, over 11% of American Indian students studying at a U.S. two-or four-year public or private not-for-profit postsecondary institution attended one of the 35 accredited TCUs. Most TCUs operate much like community colleges while providing culturally and place-based higher education for Native American students and community members.

The link between a TCU education and community progress was shown in The Alumni of Tribal Colleges and Universities Better Their Communities survey report published in September 2019 by Gallup and the American Indian College Fund. The report was the result of a survey of 5,000 American Indian College Fund scholars about the value of an education rooted in Native American values. The results show that 74% of TCU graduates surveyed forged careers serving their communities and societies, TCU graduates (43%) say they are more than twice as likely as American Indian/Alaska Native graduates of non-TCUs (21%) and college graduates nationally (18%) to have had a professor that cared about them as a person and excited them about learning and a mentor that encouraged them, and reported nearly twice as much as graduates nationwide that they are thriving financially, socially, and in their communities and careers.

Thanks to the Henry Luce Foundation’s gift, the College Fund provided TCUs with direct technology and software support such as new laptops, computer upgrades, microphones, cameras, and Internet connectivity as well as support for online teaching, learning, and student engagement, including software, Learning Management System training, and assistance through an institutional online course delivery consultant. As the Covid19 situation continues, TCU faculty are now armed with the tools they need to ensure that their work continues uninterrupted.

“We’re pleased to support the College Fund’s efforts to help tribal colleges continue their critical education work during this very challenging time,” said Sean T. Buffington, Luce Foundation Vice President.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “We deeply appreciate the support of the Henry Luce Foundation in their unique commitment to TCU faculty. Our faculty are often tribal citizens and they are definitely all members of tribal communities, so they experience this crisis in the same ways as their students. The Foundation’s support is uplifting to TCU faculty and the students they educate.”

About The Henry Luce Foundation — The Henry Luce Foundation seeks to enrich public discourse by promoting innovative scholarship, cultivating new leaders, and fostering international understanding. The Foundation advances its mission through grantmaking and leadership programs in the fields of Asia, higher education, religion and theology, art, and public policy.

Established in 1936 by Henry R. Luce, the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Time, Inc., the Foundation’s earliest work honored his parents, missionary educators in China. The Foundation’s programs today reflect the value Mr. Luce placed on learning, leadership, and long-term commitment in philanthropy.

About the American Indian College Fund – Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


CHARTER LAUNCHES $100K SPECTRUM SCHOLARS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM WITH AMERICAN INDIAN COLLEGE FUND

Charter Communications, Inc. recently announced the creation of the Spectrum Scholars program with the American Indian College Fund, a two-year educational program for eligible rising Native American and Alaska Native juniors with financial need. This is part of a larger commitment Charter has made to four organizations.

Applications are now being accepted by the American Indian College Fund to select five students who will each be awarded a $20,000 college scholarship to be used over the course of their junior and senior years. Students selected as Spectrum Scholars will participate in a structured, two-year program focused on professional development. Beginning in the 2020-2021 academic year, students also will receive a Charter mentor and the opportunity to explore an internship at Charter, one of the nation’s largest broadband and connectivity companies.

Rhonda Crichlow, Senior Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer at Charter, said, “Charter is committed to making a lasting difference in the communities we serve. We are pleased to launch Spectrum Scholars, which will provide talented, underrepresented college students critical resources, mentoring and – importantly – access to opportunities. The launch of this program comes at a time when our communities need us most, and Charter is proud to play a critical role enabling students to continue their studies.”

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “On behalf of our students, I want to thank Charter for supporting students who have an interest in telecommunications and business by not only giving them financial support but encouraging the vital experience of mentoring. Our students appreciate being able to learn more about real world opportunities and mentoring is an excellent way to provide that learning.”
The addition of Spectrum Scholars continues the company’s deep commitment to its communities. And Spectrum Scholars’ goals to further develop the company’s workforce, especially during a difficult economy, fall within Charter’s overall mission of meeting the needs of the communities it serves.
More information on how to apply to become a Spectrum Scholar is available at collegefund.org/scholarships.

Charter Communications is committed to diversity and inclusion in all aspects of its business and strives to leverage the full diversity of its people and partners to make a meaningful difference for its customers, employees and communities. In addition to this commitment, Charter’s Community Impact team has developed several programs to improve local communities. In 2015, it launched its initial signature program, Spectrum Housing Assist, with the goal of improving 50,000 homes. To date, the company has reached more than 41,000 homes. In 2017, Charter expanded its philanthropic efforts by launching Spectrum Digital Education, which provides funding to local organizations helping to close the digital divide. Since the program’s inception, the company has committed $6 million in grants and in-kind support. In 2019, Spectrum Employee Community Grants was created to support employees’ volunteer work at local social and human services nonprofits. Last year, the company donated $250,000 to 140 organizations across 24 states for this program.

About Charter: Charter Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ:CHTR) is a leading broadband connectivity company and cable operator serving more than 29 million customers in 41 states through its Spectrum brand. Over an advanced communications network, the company offers a full range of state-of-the-art residential and business services including Spectrum Internet®, TV, Mobile and Voice.

For small and medium-sized companies, Spectrum Business® delivers the same suite of broadband products and services coupled with special features and applications to enhance productivity, while for larger businesses and government entities, Spectrum Enterprise provides highly customized, fiber-based solutions. Spectrum Reach® delivers tailored advertising and production for the modern media landscape. The company also distributes award-winning news coverage, sports and high-quality original programming to its customers through Spectrum Networks and Spectrum Originals. More information about Charter can be found at corporate.charter.com.

About the American Indian College Fund: Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance.

For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


News for NGLCC

NGLCC logo
HELPING THE LGBT BUSINESS COMMUNITY THROUGH THE COVID-19 CRISIS

In our recent email blast we shared that NGLCC will always continue to work for you and our communities. We ask all stakeholders to check NGLCC’s social media pages for updates on business development webinars and trainings; online matchmakers, both B2B and corporate; support with drafting capability statements and RFPs; and much, much more to help our businesses and community stay strong and ready for the year ahead.

We encourage all stakeholders to regularly check our landing page for Coronavirus relief and other essential updates: NGLCC Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). There you will find resources from the Small Business Administration, as well as NGLCC Corporate Partners, to assist small businesses with their recovery.

Additionally, many NGLCC local affiliate chambers have regional information an economic recovery opportunities available. To find your closest local affiliate, click here.

Special Resources:

1) NGLCC COVID-19 Resource Hub for the LGBT Business Community

2) LGBTBE Business Webinars And Video Resources During Covid-19

LGBTBE BUSINESS WEBINARS

AND VIDEO RESOURCES DURING COVID-19

nglcc

Questions? Webinars@nglcc.org

This page is dedicated to our network of exceptional, innovative Certified LGBT Business Enterprise® (Certified LGBTBE®) suppliers in the NGLCC network. Here you will find information on business development webinars and trainings; online matchmakers, both B2B and corporate; support with drafting capability statements and RFPs; and much, much more to help our businesses and community stay strong and ready for the year ahead.

For funding and economic relief information, please visit our hub: NGLCC Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Additionally, many NGLCC local affiliate chambers have regional information an economic recovery opportunities available. To find your closest local affiliate, click here.


Black Women in Science and Engineering (BWISE) partners with Cambio

BWISE and CAMBIO

The demand for workers in areas, like healthcare, supply chain and others has never been more critical than today. Two businesses are now joining forces to offer solutions to help organizations find top candidates while ensuring their talent pool is diverse.

Black Women in Science and Engineering (BWISE), founded by Erika Jefferson to support underrepresented women in STEM through networking, mentorship, and career development is partnering with Cambio, a multi-faceted recruiting and diversity platform founded by Neil Patwardhan and Bob Richards. Both organizations are focused on truly moving the needle on DEI hiring in meaningful way.

BWISE, with its professional job board and network of over 15,000 scientists, engineers and technologists, can focus on guidance to employers and diverse job seekers with a focus on black women in STEM. And Cambio, through its Diversity Engine and analytics, can spotlight diverse candidates and ensure biases are surfaced and focus on delivering top candidates.

BWISE is focused on bridging the leadership gap for Black women in STEM. It was founded with the purpose to support underrepresented women through networking, mentorship and career development. The group primarily consists of black women from middle management through senior leadership with degrees in the sciences, math and engineering (even if they no longer work in that field) who would like to connect with others. The organization provides a platform and a space to share career experiences and be empowered.

Cambio’s mission is to create a more human experience in the world of recruiting and job searching with video, and make the process more transparent and fun by embracing the swipe culture of viral mobile applications. A powerful part of our platform is the ability to surface under-represented qualified talent vs jobs through a sea of resumes through our engine to ensure recruiters get the right visibility. The company aims to speed up the hiring process and lead the way in diversity hiring to help companies meet their workforce goals for 2020 and beyond.

For additional information, news and updates on BWISE, visit bwiseusa.org or follow on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.

For additional information, news and updates on Cambio, visit cambiome.com or follow on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.


NMSDC – A Message From The President

Like everyone in the network, NMSDC’s national office is innovating every day to keep our mission and our work moving forward during the COVID-19 virus emergency.

Take a look at this new update from NMSDC President/CEO Adrienne C. Trimble about how the NMSDC is working in this environment – and how that is reshaping our plans for 2020.

NMSDC is mobilizing on the virtual level. Our national office and our regional affiliates are all operating remotely, in safety and security, but we are still conducting business as usual. We are here for you, as always.

We hope you are participating in our new, weekly virtual Town Halls – online every Thursday afternoon. Join us this week for our live stream on YouTube: How CPOs Are Responding: The Corporate Perspective on the COVID-19 Business Challenges.
Technology is allowing NMSDC to keep the conversation going between MBEs and corporate members, even as we are all isolated. Engagement so far in the Town Halls has been vigorous, thought-provoking, and helpful in these difficult days. Stay tuned to your email and social media for more information on these can’t-miss events.

Sadly, as you know, the health emergency has forced the postponement of Leadership Week and the Leadership Awards gala. We hope to reschedule or otherwise make the planned content and meetings available to you.

We are also monitoring developments to see how they might affect our “destination” events later in 2020 – notably, the Program Managers’ Seminar July 14-16 in Orlando, and the annual Conference and Business Opportunity Exchange October 25-28 in Phoenix.

We will keep you apprised of developments as they occur.

Staying in touch is vital during this crisis. Never has it been more important for all of us to remember that, even from a distance …
#WeAreNMSDC!


NUDC

National Utilities Diversity Council
This webinar will offer useful insights and ideas for BRG leaders and members, human resource professionals, business managers and both formal and informal executive sponsors.

APRIL

Tuesday, April 21, 2020 10am PDT/1pm EDT

Impact Analysis: Supplier Diversity Supporting Activities
How does data inform the impact of outreach activities to advance opportunities for diverse suppliers?

Jose Espinoza, CalWater
How do you prioritize activities? Why measure impact? What does impact look like? Join Jose Espinoza, as he reviews a data-driven program: the importance in measuring impact, top-five activities; he will share tips for supplier diversity managers, advocacy organizations, and diverse suppliers. He’ll conclude with how to implement a similar approach.

In addition to going beyond demonstrating diverse spend, this webinar will illustrate the importance of each step in the supplier diversity process including why it’s important to know where diverse suppliers are coming from, so you can identify barriers. More importantly, when you have current metrics on suppliers, those metrics can be used to encourage supplier diversity growth.

The webinars and the work of NUDC is made possible in part by grants from Academy Securities, ACT-1 Group, AG Tools, Alcoa Traffic Control, American Association of Blacks in Energy, American Water, Anonymous, Arnita Smith, Burns Environmental Services, Inc., C.L. King & Associates, California Water Association, Center for Energy Workforce Development, Conitsha Barnes, Connecticut Water, Consumers Energy, Damian Rivera, Diversity Comm, Donna Ruff, Dr. Alexander Washington, Duke Energy, Edison Electric Institute, Exelon Corporation, Gainesville Regional Utilities, Gunster, Heather McCreary, Hispanics in Energy, Jesse Castellanos, Liberty Power, Loop Capital, MFR Securities, Multicultural Media, Telecom and Internet Council, New York Power Authority, NRG Energy, Osceola Consulting, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Penserra, Philadelphia Gas Works, PJM Interconnection, PPL, Ruben Strategy Group, S&H Metal & Fabricating Co. Inc., Salesforce, Sanjay Kucheria/Trinus, Southern California Edison Company, Southern California Gas Company, Southwest Gas, SouthWest Water Company, TAS Strategies, TechSoup, The Dowling-Woo Company, The ELITE SDVOB Network, Utility Workers Union of America, Yolanda Pollard; Support for the Diversity Toolkit also received from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity; the Supplier Diversity webinar series is sponsored in part by generous support from Pacific Gas and Electric Company.

Wednesday, June 26, 2019 at 10am PDT/1pm EDT

Laurie Dowling, the executive director of the National Utilities Diversity Council is hosting a webinar on The Workforce Diversity Toolkit.

This will generate important new pathways for the utilities industry and the workers, companies, workforce providers, government agencies, and regulators who dedicate their efforts to strengthening energy work force opportunities for diverse communities.

To register, visit nudc.com .


Airport Restaurateurs, Retailers and Small/Minority Businesses Urge Airports and Congress to Provide Financial Relief Industry Experiencing Unprecedented Business Impact

AMAC and ARRA logos

WASHINGTON, DC (March 18, 2020) – The Airport Restaurant & Retail Association (ARRA) and Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) urged airports and Congress to quickly pass financial relief for airport restaurateurs and retailers given the unprecedented business impact caused by the spread of the Coronavirus and resultant COVID-19 pandemic.

Members of both organizations, which include restaurants, gift shops and retail stores, have been seriously impacted given the rapid decline in airline bookings and passenger counts which are falling at unprecedented rates. Further, several state and municipalities are closing restaurants, including at airports, to help contain the spread of COVID-19. All stakeholders in the industry—airlines, airports, airport retailers and restaurateurs, and other related companies—are financially suffering.

The associations represent a $10 billion industry made up of firms of varying sizes, including many small and local businesses which contribute $2.5 billion to airport revenue streams. Together these businesses employ more than 125,000 workers in U.S. airports. The restaurants and retail shops are a vital part of the airline passenger’s travel experience, and a major revenue source on which airports depend for their operations, development and bond financing.

John Clark, Chair of AMAC commented, “Our members are suffering tremendous sales losses exceeding 50% and in some cases as high as 90%. The industry is facing a major financial crisis. Many businesses, including those classified as small and/or disadvantaged, may not be able to continue operations.”

Restaurateurs and retailers in the aviation sector are contracted by airports, airlines and third-party developers to provide passengers a full range of food, beverage and retail services. Pat Murray, Chair of the ARRA explained, “our members’ ability to retain and pay employees, as well as pay rents to airports, has been seriously jeopardized. Some of our members will likely be unable to meet our debt obligations and will be forced out of business if quick action is not taken to provide relief.”

The two associations urged airports to engage with their members quickly and adopt mitigating actions to save the businesses:

• Waive rent, other fees and the imposition of penalties for at least six (6) months with the opportunity to extend depending on the extent and impact of the crisis.
• Suspend and defer concessionaires’ capital investment requirements.
• Provide operational flexibility including, but not limited to adjustments to operating hours, locations and menus/product selections as well as selective temporary closing of stores and restaurants in order to better align with passenger volumes and flows and reduce the impact on employees.

ARRA and AMAC strongly support the airports’ request for emergency financial assistance and flexibility to help sustain operations, preserve jobs and bonds, including assistance and flexibility for concessionaires during this critical time. ARRA and AMAC urged Congress and the Administration to also provide financial relief and assistance to airport concessionaires to ensure business continuity, secure loans and make debt service payments. Specific measures ARRA and AMAC urge Congress and the Administration to act upon are:

• Provide grants and low-interest or interest-free loans to concessionaires to allow concessionaires to cover operating expenses.
• Provide loan guarantees to concessionaires to assure their ability to continue making debt service payments and secure loans for their ongoing capital investment requirements.

About Airport Restaurant & Retail Association
The Association’s mission is to work collaboratively with aviation-industry trade associations and the airport community on matters of policy decision-making with a collective impact on restaurant/retail members. As members of the airport communities we serve, ARRA members have an expertise and understanding of best practices in the complex aviation restaurant and retail operational environment. Our knowledge can ultimately deliver powerful solutions of benefit to our airport partners.

About the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC)
The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is the only national, non-profit trade association dedicated to advance the full participation of minorities and women in employment and contracting opportunities throughout the aviation and aerospace industries. Since 1984, AMAC has been at the forefront of nearly every national policy initiative impacting the participation of disadvantaged businesses in airport contracting. AMAC works consistently with Congress, the Federal government, aviation trade associations and others as a resource for information, education and guidance on business and employment matters. For more information, visit amac-org.com.

 

Emerging Researchers National (ERN ) Conference 2020 Presentation Award Recipients