News From Our Partners

Erin Griffin of American Indian College Fund Awarded 2022 Bush Fellowship

Erin Griffin (Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of Sisseton, South Dakota), a Program Officer for Indigenous Education at the American Indian College Fund, is one of 24 extraordinary leaders who was selected by the Bush Foundation for a 2022 Bush Fellowship. The Bush Foundation, headquartered in St. Paul, Minnesota, each year awards Bush Fellows with up to $100,000 over 12 to 24 months to pursue education and learning experiences that help them develop the skills and relationships to foster large-scale change in their communities and region.

erin griffin headshot
Erin Griffin (Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate of Sisseton, South Dakota), a Program Officer for Indigenous Education at the American Indian College Fund, is one of 24 extraordinary leaders who was selected by the Bush Foundation for a 2022 Bush Fellowship.

Erin’s vision, Makoce ataya Dakota Oyate kin Dakota iapi kte, is seeing the Dakota Oyate (Dakota people) speak the Dakota language everywhere in the future. Her work and her dream were born of her desire from an early age to understand and speak Dakota, but it was difficult to find effective learning strategies and opportunities to expand her knowledge. Erin has dedicated much of her work and passion to creating spaces for her community to learn the Dakota language and culture and works to create even greater change while establishing supportive places for people, especially women, to speak Dakota. To ensure she can lead this effort, she is working to finish her doctoral degree in Indigenous language and culture revitalization and to increase her proficiency in the Dakota language. Work without creating intentional moments for rest and rejuvenation cannot sustain itself, and Erin is also dedicating efforts to that end.

Erin was one of 468 people who applied for the fellowship this year. More than 2,400 people have received support from the Fellowship over the past 60 years. An in-depth application process includes interviews and mentoring sessions with community leaders, Bush Fellows alumni, and Bush Foundation staff, allowing applicants to name the impact they seek and what they need to get to the next level of their desired leadership.

Erin said the fellowship and her leadership goals connected to the Dakota language are important to her because, “The Dakota language is a significant component to my everyday life; it informs my worldview and understanding and guides my action. The ability to understand and speak Dakota in conjunction with my work, family and friends, gardening, artwork, and moments of silence brings me fullness and feeds my passion on a daily basis. This helps me to achieve my responsibilities as a Dakota woman.” Her interest in working for the American Indian College Fund was sparked during her time as a faculty member for Sisseton Wahpeton College on her home reservation. There she was involved with administering projects funded by the College Fund in the traditional arts and environmental stewardship and in creating infrastructure to revitalize language and culture and strengthen cultural knowledge.

“I love the opportunity to engage with tribal colleges and colleagues with a foundation of Indigenous languages. Seeing doors and spaces open where everyone feels comfortable using their languages is inspiring. The ability for us to learn and share our languages through various programming builds on the strengths of each of our tribes that are represented,” Erin said.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “It is such an honor to support our team member, Erin, as she continues her advocacy for and participation with Native language and identity restoration. We appreciate the Bush Foundation continuing its commitment to building the capabilities and network of Native scholars and teachers. This opportunity for Erin is a necessary and welcome part of our commitment to Native self-determination.”

The Bush Fellowship is distinctive in its flexibility, allowing fellows to define what they need to become more effective and equitable leaders. Fellows can use the funding to pursue an education, leadership training, networking, and mentorship.

The selection committees for the Bush Fellowship included individuals from a mix of sectors, geography, genders, and racial and ethnic identities to reflect the diversity of the region the Bush Foundation serves, which includes Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, or one of the 23 Native nations that shares the same geography.

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 32 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $15.5 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2020-21. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $259 million in scholarships, programmatic and community support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


U.S. Senate Unanimously Approves Resolution Supporting Latinos in STEM

SHPE Collaborated with Senators Alex Padilla and John Cornyn and Representatives Tony Cárdenas and María Salazar, Emphasizing the Potential of Latinos in STEM and the Current Disparity in Graduation Rates and Career Success

(City of Industry, CA) — SHPE applauds the United States Senate for unanimously approving Senate Resolution 640, which expresses “support for increasing the number of Latino students and young professionals entering careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields.”

The bipartisan resolution was sponsored by Senator Alex Padilla (D-CA) and co-sponsored by Senator John Cornyn (R-TX). The House of Representatives has a companion Resolution (H.Res. 1105) pending its consideration that was introduced by Representatives Tony Cárdenas (D-CA) and María Elvira Salazar (R-FL).

The resolution states that the Senate—

1. Supports the goal of increasing the number of Latino individuals in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (in this resolution referred to as ‘‘STEM’’) as a way to promote economic empowerment and sustainability, not only in their community but in the overall economy of the United States;

2. Supports increasing the representation of Latino individuals in STEM fields to enhance and improve representation and improve performance in the STEM workforce, which will help— (a) develop talented and capable STEM workers; (b) reduce the dependence of the economy of the United States on foreign workers; and (c) secure the future of the United States as a leader in STEM;

3. Encourages increased Federal support for initiatives aimed at boosting the number of Latino students who pursue STEM education and career paths, particularly engineering; and

4. Recognizes the important role that Hispanic Serving Institutions and all colleges and universities must play in order to achieve this goal of increasing Latino individuals in STEM.

“SHPE is incredibly grateful to Senators Padilla and Cornyn, for their leadership and for considering our ideas as they worked to secure Senate passage of this important resolution. Their commitment to the success of Hispanics in STEM will move our nation forward and improve the lives of all Americans,” said SHPE CEO Chris Wilkie. “Coupled with the pending House Resolution introduced by our champions, Reps. Cardenas and Salazar, official statements like this one, made at the federal level, will not only drive competition and innovation in the STEM industry, but will also have a positive effect on this important demographic for generations to come.”

“Our collective prosperity depends on expanding opportunities for all students – from every background – to study and succeed in the critical science, technology, engineering and math fields,” said James Brown, Executive Director of the STEM Education Coalition. “We applaud Senators Padilla and Cornyn for getting the Senate to make a clear, bipartisan statement about the importance of increasing the number of Latinos in STEM fields. We share the belief that Congress must step up and deliver on this important national imperative.”

Working with Congressional champions on the introduction and passage of a Congressional resolution is a part of an overall strategy SHPE began in late 2021 to ensure that it is actively involved at the federal level. “In the last few years, it has become more and more apparent that we need to be in the rooms where decisions are made.” Wilkie explains.

“The immediate recognition of the need for this Resolution by its sponsors and the fact that the U.S. Senate adopted it unanimously goes to show how critical the need is for Hispanics in STEM.” states Wilkie. “I can’t wait until the incredible gifts, brilliant minds, and innovative solutions of the Hispanic community are known, sought-after, and appreciated around the country. This is truly something we can ALL get behind.”

ABOUT SHPE

SHPE (Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers) is a nonprofit organization serving and advancing Hispanics in STEM. With more than 13,000 student and professional members, SHPE’s mission is to change lives by empowering the Hispanic community to realize its fullest potential and to impact the world through STEM awareness, access, support, and development. For more information, please visit https://www.shpe.org/


Commercial UAV Expo Conference Program Announced!

Organizers of Commercial UAV Expo, the world’s leading commercial drone trade show and conference, have announced an important list of conference topics and impressive roster of industry leaders who will be presenting at the 2022 event. The educational program focuses on how drone technology is solving problems and creating meaningful ROI across various industries. The event will take place September 6-8, 2022, at Caesars Forum in Las Vegas.

Experts from DJI, DroneUp, Elroy Air, FAA, Kiewit, Lockheed Martin, Microsoft, Skydio, State of Alaska, Sundt Construction, Turner Mining Group, Windover Construction, Wing, Zipline and many other top organizations will share their expertise on a range of topics. Session formats include Keynotes and Visionary Panels, where drone innovators, regulators, and end-users share their expertise and vision and discuss the critical issues facing the industry; Deep-Dive Vertical Market Sessions that offer practical, actionable education for professionals working with UAS in vertical markets including construction, infrastructure, and surveying and mapping; and Industry Update Sessions that provide up-to-the-minute information on topics that affect everyone in UAS, such as AAM, BVLOS, and autonomy.

Featured sessions include:

Keynotes

Deep-Dive Vertical Market Sessions

Industry Update Sessions

View the entire conference program here.

“Commercial UAV Expo is the definitive event for professionals from across the globe integrating and operating commercial UAS,” said Lee Corkhill, Group Event Director at Diversified Communications, organizer of Commercial UAV Expo. “Our education goes beyond the hype to address how drone technology is being used to tackle the real-world challenges professionals face every day, and how they can maximize ROI. You simply can’t get this anywhere else.”

Select sessions are produced in partnership with the Commercial Drone Alliance, an organization that advocates for the commercial use of drones by reducing barriers to enable this game-changing technology.

“The impact of regulation on the present and future of the drone industry can’t be overstated, which makes events like the Commercial UAV Expo so important to our members,” said Lisa Ellman, Executive Director of the Commercial Drone Alliance. “We’ve designed this program to be the place where industry and federal government stakeholders come together to discuss what regulatory changes are necessary for this technology to scale commercially, and how drone programs can operate today. There are clear safety, efficiency and environmental advantages to using drones for countless tasks and this event showcases insights relevant to stakeholders from across the ecosystem.”

Commercial UAV Expo provides education, technology, and resources for professionals in industries including Construction, Drone Delivery, Energy & Utilities, Forestry & Agriculture, Infrastructure & Transportation, Mining & Aggregates, Public Safety & Emergency Services, Security, and Surveying & Mapping. The DRONERESPONDERS Public Safety Summit presented by AIRT two days of programming designed to educate and prepare first responder UAS program managers and remote pilots at every experience level for public safety UAS operations.

More than 175 companies will exhibit at Commercial UAV Expo, showcasing the newest UAS solutions including airframes, software, sensors, and services. More than 300 associations and media companies are signed on as supporters.

Commercial UAV Expo kicks off Tuesday, September 6, 2022, with pre-conferencing programming, Live Outdoor Flying Demonstrations and a Welcome Happy Hour to kick off the opening of the Exhibit Floor. The main conference program and exhibits run Wednesday, September 7 and Thursday, September 8. Additional features of the programming include Exhibitor Showcases, workshops, networking events, and more. Visit www.expouav.com for more information on attending or exhibiting.

Register before July 15, 2022 for early bird rates.

About Commercial UAV Expo

Commercial UAV Expo, presented by Commercial UAV News, is an international conference and expo exclusively focused on commercial UAS integration and operation covering industries including Construction; Drone Delivery; Energy & Utilities; Forestry & Agriculture; Infrastructure & Transportation; Mining & Aggregates; Public Safety & Emergency Services; Security; and Surveying & Mapping. It takes place September 6 – 8, 2022 at Caesars Forum, Las Vegas NV. For more information, visit www.expouav.com.

Commercial UAV Expo is produced by Diversified Communications’ technology portfolio which also includes Commercial UAV News; Geo Week, Geo Week Newsletter, SPAR 3D Newsletter, AEC Next Newsletter.

For more information about exhibiting at Commercial UAV Expo, visit Exhibiting Information or contact Katherine Dow, Sales Manager, at kdow@divcom.com or +1.207-842-5497. For attending information, visit www.expouav.com or email info@expouav.com.


The American Indian College Fund Honors Paul Robertson, President, Tohono O’odham Community College, as Tribal College and University Honoree of the Year

President Paul Robertson, Tohono O’odham Community College
President Paul Robertson, Tohono O’odham Community College

The American Indian College Fund has named Paul Robertson, President of Tohono O’odham Community College (TOCC) in Sells, Arizona, as its 2021-22 Tribal College and University Honoree of the Year for his dedication to tribal college education. President Robertson will receive a $1,200 honorarium sponsored by The Adolph Coors Foundation.

Robertson started his career as a social worker after a deployment in Vietnam. His tribal college education career began when he visited his brother, who was working at Oglala Lakota College in South Dakota. Robertson liked South Dakota and the TCU so much that he applied for a job there and was hired. He has been involved in Native higher education ever since.

“It was a rude awakening to find the conditions that existed there in the 1980s—not just the lack of social services—but the oppression of Lakota landowners who often lacked control over their own land,” he said. That situation spurred Robertson to complete his dissertation on the colonial history of the reservation and to join his wife Eileen Iron Cloud in organizing efforts aimed at redressing grievances involving land, pollution, domestic violence, and treaty rights.

Robertson particularly enjoyed his role as a teacher. He developed courses that focused on human rights, including child abuse and neglect, decolonization and liberation, the power of the land, and the “Take the Black Hills Back” movement. The curriculum, informed by the precepts of Participatory Action Research, involved students in advocating for their communities. One successful effort involved a sit-in at the South Dakota state capital to protest the Blashfield Mural depicting the subjugation of Native peoples by white settlers under the banner of the “spirit of progress.” The mural was covered soon after.

Robertson joined Little Priest Tribal College in 2010 and served as president for three years. After a stint as Chief of Operations at Sinte Gleska University, he joined TOCC in January of 2016, where he plans to stay until his retirement in 2023.

With over 40 years of expertise in tribal college education, Robertson said the number one threat to tribally controlled higher education has been the Covid-19 pandemic. Tribal colleges are places of “vibrant, face-to-face higher education,” he said, and he is now working to recreate that unique spirit of TCU education at TOCC in the online environment in the wake of the Covid-19 outbreak.

Robertson attributed TOCC’s survival during the pandemic and its successful transition to 100% online education in the spring of 2020 to the groundwork laid through pro bono support from AIHEC’s cyber team and the recommendations it made in 2018. TOCC was an early adopter of the cyber team’s recommendations, which helped prepare the college for the unanticipated impacts of the pandemic. The CARES Act and other COVID-19 relief funds were also a lifeline. This combination of preparedness and federal funding positioned TOCC to extend its reach outside of the reservation borders to O’odham speakers in the Gila, Salt River, and Maricopa communities, and to a total of more than 55 tribal nations. In addition, TOCC also brought San Carlos Apache College (SCAC) under its wing. While SCAC students are TOCC students now, the 200-plus students at that campus will comprise the nucleus of SCAC when it achieves its own accreditation.

Thanks to these efforts and lowered tuition, more students in the TOCC communities can access higher education and have done so. TOCC’s enrollment has quadrupled from fall of 2015 to its current enrollment in 2022. In fall 2015, 211 students were enrolled. In spring 2020, the number of enrolled students rose to 474. In fall 2021, the student body grew to 750 students. This semester, 900 students are currently enrolled.

Robertson attributed TOOC’s popularity to many factors. One is the low cost of tuition. When Robertson became president, he cut the cost of tuition per credit hour in half—from $68.50 to $34.25. TOCC also committed to continuing the Tribal Nation’s traditions, language, and culture. Students are engaged and pleased to take these courses, which relate back to their own experiences, Robertson said. Underlying all of that is TOCC’s leadership and support network.

“This TCU is blessed with the generosity and continuous ongoing support of the Tohono O’odham Nation. TOCC is well-positioned because of the casinos the Nation has and the regular fiscal support from the Nation in ways that other TCUs may not enjoy,” he said.

In addition to the Tribal Nation’s investment in TOCC, Robertson said the stability of its board of trustees is critical to the college’s success. “It [the board] stays the course, and members have never missed a meeting for lack of a quorum. Regular monthly meetings last three hours or longer, but the board is dedicated, and this makes my job easier.”

That job includes adapting the school’s offerings to a new type of student. During the pandemic, student demographics shifted, with the average age of O’odham students now being 34 years old and other students being 33 years old. Seventy-nine percent of students are female, 70% have children, and 52% are employed full time, with 20% working part time.

In addition to meeting students’ academic and cultural needs, Robertson and his team work to provide students with programs that give them access to affordable higher education. These programs include transportation to in-person classes, online classes for a diverse student body, dorms for 32 full-time students, and free meals on campus.

In addition, to draw students back to campus in fall 2022, TOCC plans a variety of activities including volleyball, archery, stargazing, films, cultural events, and traditional harvests of desert plants.

“I think TCUs, despite the pandemic, are undergoing an efflorescence because of the support of institutions like the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC) and the American Indian College Fund. President Lionel Bordeaux [of Sinte Gleska University on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota and an original TCU founder] said we need to rekindle the fire that existed at the time of our founding. I think the fire that President Bordeaux reminded us of is coming back,” he said.

After retirement, Robertson hopes to teach as an adjunct professor and return to the writing projects he was planning before getting involved in TCU administration, which he said is an all-consuming enterprise.

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 32 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $15.5 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2020-21. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $259 million in scholarships, programmatic and community support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Out to Innovate Career Development Fellowship winners 2022

Today, Out to Innovate is proud to announce the winners for the 2022 Out to Innovate Career Development Fellowship, formerly known as the Ben Barres Fellowship. This merit-based fellowship provides awards, for up to $5000, to support professional development of trans, intersex, and non-binary graduate students and post-doctoral fellows in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

Thirteen trans, intersex, and non-binary early career researchers have been awarded amounts ranging from $1000 to $5000. This year’s fellows are in the fields of particle physics, bioengineering, wildlife ecology, neuroscience, marine ecology, restoration ecology, and forensic anthropology at universities in the US and Canada. This is a merit-based award, and the funds support the recipient’s professional development. Twelve awards were funded by an anonymous donor and one by 23andMe.

The majority of the funds are supporting equipment, training courses, supplies, and conference attendance.

The winners of this year’s awards are:

Christine Hamadani is a graduate student in chemistry at the University of Mississippi validating novel ionic liquid coated nanoparticles for therapeutic applications.

Claire Hansel is a physics graduate student at the University of Colorado – Boulder studying ion channel laser radiation as it interacts with plasma, in an effort to validate its use in small scale X-ray beam experiments.

Courtney Willett is a graduate student in genetics and molecular biology at Emory University studying the relationship between cell potency and chromatin dynamics, a poorly-understood component of cell differentiation.

Drew Powell is a graduate student in the Geography and Environmental Systems Department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County studying the interactive effects of tree cover and proximity to pollutant sources on heavy metal air pollution in Baltimore.

Eli Chlan is a graduate student at Emory University in the Neuroscience program studying glia in retinal pathology and neurovascular function.

Em Lim is a graduate student in biology at Simon Fraser University studying the impacts of animal excrement on cold-water reef ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest with implications for aquaculture and conservation.

M Wittkop is a graduate student in chemistry at Montana State University optimizing computational methods to more accurately replicate quantum processes such as photochemistry.

Mila Halgren is a graduate student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Brain & Cognitive Sciences Department comparing neocortex physiology across species in effort to understand the evolution of the mammalian brain.

Parker Lund is a graduate student in biology at Humboldt State University establishing the role of host-associated microbes in anemone invasion ecology.

Riley Pizza is a graduate student at Michigan State University in the Department of Plant Biology investigating seeding strategies for successful and biodiverse environmental restoration.

Silas Fischer is a graduate student in ecology at the University of Toledo studying desert songbird responses to climate change.

Taylor Flaherty is a graduate student in forensic anthropology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas quantifying the effects of gender affirming hormone therapy on bone structure for more accurate and affirming forensic classification.

This year we are pleased to be able to provide one fellowship sponsored by 23andMe to Hannah Young. Hannah is a graduate student in molecular biology at the University of Utah studying how the immune system differentiates between genetic material from the host and virus during a viral infection.

The winners will be invited to the next Out To Innovate awards ceremony on May 28, 2022.


Advisory Board Announced for Commercial UAV Expo 2022

Organizers of the eighth annual Commercial UAV Expo, the leading global commercial drone conference and expo, have announced an impressive list of influential leaders in the drone industry who will be participating on the Advisory Board. The event will take place September 6 – 8, 2022 at Caesars Forum in Las Vegas.

“Commercial UAV Expo’s Advisory Board is comprised of UAS specialists and industry leaders who will help develop programming that delivers vital information and insights at the most important UAS event of 2022,” said Lee Corkhill, Group Director at Diversified Communications, organizer of the event. “The Board represents a mix of professionals who are experts in the critical issues in the industry. They are at the top of their respective fields, and they are ready to bring their connections and commitment to delivering the best conference and expo the market has ever seen.”

Members of the Commercial UAV Expo Advisory Board include:

  • Greg Agvent, Senior Director, CNN
  • Sebastian Babiarz, Chief Operating Officer, Dronehub, Co-President of GUTMA
  • Jonathan Beaty, Director, Kiewit Geospatial Services
  • Robert Blair, Owner/Vice President of Agriculture, Three Canyon Farms/Aigen
  • Michael Cohen, Chair, Aerial Evolution Association of Canada
  • Lisa Ellman, Executive Director, Hogan Lovells/Commercial Drone Alliance
  • Dyan Gibbens, CEO & Founder, Trumbull Unmanned
  • Shayne Gill, Program Director, AASHTO
  • James Grimsley, Executive Director, Advanced Technology Initiatives, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma
  • Brendan Groves, Vice President, Regulatory and Policy Affairs, Skydio
  • Grant Guillot, President, Grant Guillot, LLC
  • Thomas Haun, Chief Operating Officer, Turner Mining Group
  • Ethan Hunt, Principal Technical Program Manager, AT&T
  • Grant Jordan, CEO, SkySafe
  • Ted Kalnas, Fire Captain II & UAS Pilot, Los Angeles City Fire Department
  • Roxana Kennedy, Chief of Police, Chula Vista Police Department
  • Eszter Kovács, Founder, DroneTalks
  • Eileen Lockhart, Director of Emerging Markets, Spright an Air Methods Company
  • Robert McCoy, Manager, Quality Assurance, Crown Castle
  • Jennifer Pidgen, Creator of Opportunities (COO), Sundance Media Group
  • Todd Schlekeway, President & CEO, NATE
  • Chris Todd, Executive Director, DRONERESPONDERS – AIRT
  • Tom Walker, CEO, DroneUp
  • Gretchen West, Drone Industry Consultant

Bios may be found here.

The Advisory Board will assist in developing conference programming comprised of both general sessions and vertical industry breakout sessions that delve into UAS integration and operation for specific vertical industries including construction; drone delivery; energy & utilities; forestry & agriculture; infrastructure & transportation; mining & aggregates; public safety & emergency service; security; and surveying & mapping. BVLOS, ROI, AAM and other pressing topics will be addressed in depth as part of the programming.

The 2021 edition of Commercial UAV Expo drew 1,955 verified professionals out of 2,745 total registrants and 130 exhibitors from throughout the world. Advisory Board members expressed their enthusiasm at being involved in this year’s event and building on the momentum from last year.

“Commercial UAV Expo is a great opportunity to talk about the future of the UAS industry,” said Sebastian Babiarz, Chief Operating Officer of Dronehub. “By bringing together the best experts and specialists in one place, the event will also allow us to highlight the benefits, the best uses of drones, bridge the gaps and discover new services. The Golden Age of drones is finally coming.”

“We continue to see rapid growth in the adoption of emerging aviation technologies, and Commercial UAV Expo is one of the most productive gatherings for the industry,” said James Grimsley, Executive Director of Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. “We are excited to participate in this event!”

Jonathan Beaty, Director of Kiewit Geospatial Services, agreed. “With the continued year-over-year growth of opportunities for UAS applications, manufacturers, service providers and industry professionals, it’s important we come together as a collective to share our knowledge and experiences to further adoption of the collective global drone industry.”

In addition to the extensive conference program, Commercial UAV Expo offers a vendor neutral show floor with more exhibitors than any other commercial UAS event, featuring best-in-class solutions from manufacturers, suppliers and service providers that focus on commercial drone applications. Additional event features include vendor-delivered Product Previews, DRONERESPONDERS Public Safety Summit, Exhibit Hall Theater Programming, networking receptions, and live Outdoor Drone Demonstrations. More than 250 global partners from six continents representing media, associations, portals and more, support the event.

Registration will open in May. Commercial drone professionals are encouraged to register early to secure discounted conference pricing, and to fill out the Attendee Inquiry form for event updates.

About Commercial UAV Expo

Commercial UAV Expo, presented by Commercial UAV News, is an international conference and expo exclusively focused on commercial UAS integration and operation covering industries including Construction; Drone Delivery; Energy & Utilities; Forestry & Agriculture; Infrastructure & Transportation; Mining & Aggregates; Public Safety & Emergency Services; Security; and Surveying & Mapping. It takes place September 6 – 8, 2022 at Caesars Forum, Las Vegas NV. For more information, visit https://www.expouav.com/.

Commercial UAV Expo is produced by Diversified Communications’ technology portfolio which also includes Commercial UAV News; Geo Week, comprised of the International Lidar Mapping Forum, SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference; Geo Week Newsletter, SPAR 3D Newsletter, AEC Next Newsletter; Geo Business and Digital Construction Week.

For more information about exhibiting at Commercial UAV Expo, visit the Exhibitor Information page or contact Katherine Dow, Sales Manager, at kdow@divcom.com or +1.207-842-5497. For attending information, visit https://www.expouav.com/ or email info@expouav.com.

Questions?

Lora Burns, Commercial UAV Expo Marketing Manager, lburns@divcom.com


American Indian College Fund Publishes Scholar and Employee Blogs for Women’s History Month

The Stories We Tell

The American Indian College Fund is celebrating Women’s History Month/International Women’s Day by publishing several women leaders/teachers/artists/communicators/community activists’ blogs. The first blog by Sandy Packo, Iñupiaq, College Readiness Program Administrator, details her personal experiences of culture clash: being told she was NOT a leader when her skills, ability, and ways of communicating were prized in her culture but were judged negatively by non-community members. https://collegefund.org/blog/the-stories-we-tell/

Bringing Native Voices to the National Conversation

Harley-Daniel Interpreter (Diné) is an American Indian College Fund Indigenous Visionary Fellow who attends Diné College. For her fellowship, she is working on the Voter Educational Forum, a student-led event to inform and educate her tribal members about voting as a fundamental responsibility. https://collegefund.org/blog/bringing-native-voices-to-the-national-conversation/


BDPA Co-Founder, IT Hall of Famer, and Tech Industry Legend Earl A. Pace, Jr. passes away at 79

By Norman Mays, Kenneth Wilson, and Sharrarne Morton, BDPA Earl Pace Jr. speaking at podium

Earl A. Pace, Jr., a computer programmer trainee at the Pennsylvania Railroad who went on to become an entrepreneur, an iconic figure of civil rights in the tech industry, and a staunch proponent of technology inclusion initiatives, died February 19, 2022, after enduring a long illness his family said in a statement. He was 79.

“All of us will miss his caring, his love and his sound wisdom as co-founder of Black Data Processing Associates (BDPA). The date and details of a memorial service will be announced in the near future. Please keep us in your hearts and prayers.”

A distinguished alum of The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State), Mr. Pace has been in the Information Technology (IT) industry since 1965. He left the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1967. Over the next decade he rose through the ranks of programmer, programmer analyst, programming manager, and on to Vice President of a financial telecommunications company in Philadelphia, PA. He became a business owner in 1976 when he incorporated Pace Data Systems, a full service information technology firm providing services and support through its Philadelphia, PA and Washington, D.C. offices primarily to banks and savings banks.

In 1975, Mr. Pace co-founded BDPA in Philadelphia and operated as its president for two years. In 1978 he coordinated the formation of BDPA into a national organization and functioned as its first National President until 1980. National BDPA has grown into one of the largest professional organizations representing minorities across the IT industry. In 1992, the BDPA Education and Technology Foundation (BETF or BDPA Foundation) chaired by Mr. Pace, was founded to support the education and technical programs of BDPA. In 2011, Mr. Pace was the first IT Innovator honored during CompTIA’s annual IT Hall of Fame induction ceremony.

Within BDPA and on a broader industrial scale, Mr. Pace was a vocal advocate for business ownership. His primary message since starting BDPA has always been minorities should strive to rise above just ‘getting a job’ while pursuing ownership, operating their own businesses, and landing a position on a Corporate Board of Directors.

About BDPA

BDPA, formerly known as Black Data Processing Associates, is an international organization with a diverse membership of professionals and students at all levels in the fields of information technology, computer science, data science, and related science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Founded in Philadelphia, PA in 1975, BDPA Members and BDPA Student Members remain actively engaged in serving their respective communities through technology inclusion programs and STEM outreach events while charting the futures of IT and digital inclusivity with Industry.


BDPA & NSBE “Entrepreneurship: From Idea To Launch”

BDPA and National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) have partnered to create an experience for new or aspiring Entrepreneurs entitled “Entrepreneurship: From Idea To Launch.”

This will consist of virtual sessions led by thriving entrepreneurs, hands-on coaching and feedback on business ideas, and a chance to earn additional support for your business at the culmination of the program!

If interested in participating in this unique opportunity, please submit the included Intake Form.

Form: https://forms.gle/mUB6z4ttUdnyABvd8


Geo Week 2022 Brings the Geospatial and Built Worlds Together In-Person, Exceeds Expectations

 
Nearly 1,900 professionals gathered in-person; show floor completely sold out

Geospatial and built world professionals gathered last week for Geo Week, held February 6-8, 2022 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver. Geo Week is the coming together of former stand-alone events AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, and powerful partnership events including ASPRS Annual Conference, MAPPS Annual Conference and USIBD Annual Symposium.

Geo Week had a sold-out exhibit hall floor featuring 140+ companies and the event brought together 1,890 verified professionals out of more than 2,100 registrants, representing 49 states and 48 countries, cementing its place as the premier event for increased integration between the built environment, advanced airborne/terrestrial technologies, and commercial 3D technologies.

“The turnout was tremendous,” said Lee Corkhill, Group Director at Diversified Communications, which produces the event. “After so much time apart, it was clear that the industry was ready to connect again in person. By bringing together multiple events under one roof, the event surpassed every expectation this year and we are thrilled to be back supporting our customers and helping to advance geospatial and the built world.”

Geo Week kicked off Sunday, February 6, with Product Previews, followed by two and a half days of extensive conference programming from 125+ speakers, including keynote presentations from innovators at Draper, Microsoft, USGS, Planet, EndeavorXR, NVIDIA and NASA.  The keynote presentations can be accessed online here.  

The excitement on the expansive exhibit hall floor was palpable. Best-in-class solutions from the most influential companies were on display, allowing attendees to source the latest geospatial and built world innovations while networking with vendors and one another. Dozens of new products were introduced at Geo Week making it a true hub for innovation. 

Special features of the 2022 event included a Pitch the Press event, during which the latest products from NavVis, Avatour and Prostar GeoCorp were chosen from 16 presentations that were pitched rapid-fire to a panel of high-profile press representatives at Geo Week. These solutions represented the cutting edge in reality capture, collaborative work and visualization tools.

The Geo Week Awards Ceremony celebrated excellence across the geospatial industry in collaboration with LIDAR Magazine, LiDAR News and ASPRS. The LIDAR Leaders Awards recognized accomplishments from Emesent, Outsight, University of Oregon, Minnesota 3DGeomatics Committee and a posthumous award honoring Martin Isenburg of Rapid Lasso.  The Younger Geospatial Professional Award recognized Rami Tamimi, the founder and chief geodetic engineer at GEOIC. The Geo Week Awards ceremony can be viewed here.

Numerous networking events were held, including the Welcome Happy Hour sponsored by Trimble and the sold-out Elevated Networking Reception sponsored by MAPPS and Sanborn Map Company.

Many attendees expressed excitement at returning to in-person events. Nathan Hopper, Project Manager/Lead Scientist at Woolpert, remarked, “It’s been a great turnout. I can’t tell you how refreshing it is to see people, talk to people, sit down with people, and not present yourself on a screen across to an empty medium, so that’s been fantastic. That’s what we missed during the pandemic.”

Jason Stoker, Physical Scientist at USGS, shared the sentiment, “It’s been great to get back out after two years and actually see people face to face.  I think everybody’s really happy to be around and interface face to face again.”

The theme of technological collaboration across teams was prevalent throughout the conference. Amy Peck, Founder and CEO of EndeavorVR, commented, “To understand the workforce and their workflows, we need to be smart about how we introduce this technology, because it touches every single aspect of building lifecycle management from the design phase, even the investment phase.”

Hopper continued, “That’s why we come together as communities. So we can establish relationships, foster relationships, look at people, and establish trust. When you’re in an industry, it takes a team of industry members to make things happen for projects, and you have to have that level of trust. And it’s just something you cannot establish or maintain in a remote setting.”

Geo Week was supported by 148 publications, portals, associations, user groups, analysts, cooperating events, government agencies, non-profits and others. “We are grateful to the partners who chose to back and promote this event. Their engagement is so important, and we look forward to continuing to provide value to one another in the coming years,” said Corkhill. 

“By convening the most influential companies and thought leaders to share their expertise and solutions, we gave everyone involved in the geospatial and built world markets the opportunity to learn from the best,” said Corkhill.  The next iteration of Geo Week takes place February 13-15, 2023 in Denver, CO.

About Geo Week

Geo Week is part of a network of events and media for the global geospatial and built markets organized by Diversified Communications, a leading organizer of conferences, trade shows, and online media with 15 years in the technology arena. Geo Week, taking place February 13-15, 2023 in Denver, is the name of previously stand-alone events AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, and reflects the increased integration between the built environment, advanced airborne/terrestrial technologies, and commercial 3D technologies. Powerful partnership events also take place at Geo Week, including ASPRS (American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing), MAPPS and USIBD (US Institute of Building Documentation). Diversified Communications also produces Geo Week E-Newsletter, SPAR 3D E-Newsletter, AEC Next –E-Newsletter, GeoBusiness Show (UK), Digital Construction Week (UK), Commercial UAV Expo, and Commercial UAV News. For more information, visit www.geo-week.com.

Questions?

Lora Burns, Geo Week Marketing Manager, LBurns@divcom.com


FEI and NABA Form Strategic Partnership

Access to Finance and Accounting Community and Content Hub Aims to Educate, Encourage, and Empower Early- to Mid-Career Financial Professionals; Marks First Step in Multi-Phase Agreement

Financial Executives International (FEI), the association of choice for CFOs, CAOs, and other finance leaders, and the National Association of Black Accountants (NABA) have entered into a strategic partnership focused on the professional development of future finance leaders. Through this partnership, NABA members will be provided a subscription to FEI Engage, the only community and content hub for career development focused strictly on finance and accounting. FEI Engage will increase NABA members’ ability to connect with an expanded finance network and tap into the wisdom of experienced financial professionals for learning, development, and career advancement.

“We’re honored to partner with the National Association of Black Accountants to help fulfill their very important mission,” said Andrej Suskavcevic, President and CEO of Financial Executives International and Financial Education & Research Foundation (FERF). “We believe that the future of the profession depends on a community effort to develop emerging talent. FEI’s membership comprises a wealth of knowledge from some of the most reputable and influential financial leaders in their fields. We hope that by extending access to those individuals through FEI Engage, NABA can continue to bridge the opportunity gap for Black professionals in the accounting, finance, and related business professions.”

FEI Engage includes various professional development resources, including:

  • Mentor Match, establishes one-on-one mentor relationships between students or professionals and FEI members. A proven self-development method, mentorships can help both mentee and mentor develop perspective, build confidence, gain new skills and knowledge, and advance personal development and career goals.
  • How I Got Here, live webinars and podcasts provide educational platforms for experienced finance professionals to share their journeys and insight. Example conversation topics include diversity, equity, and inclusion; career development and transitions; networking skills; and leadership development.
  • FEIconnect, a private social network for FEI Engage subscribers enables peer-to-peer interaction and information sharing.
  • Data Dashboard provides access to timely industry-specific research that can give users a competitive edge.

“This partnership provides NABA’s professional and student members with an opportunity to become both mentors and mentees. We see this as a unique value to both NABA and FEI members, an opportunity to “lift as they climb” and engage in advancing both organizations’ goals. We are excited to pave a path together with FEI. This partnership is just the beginning in providing Black Business Leaders limitless opportunities,” said Guylaine Saint Juste, President and Chief Executive Officer, National Association of Black Accountants, Inc.

About FEI
Financial Executives International (FEI) is the leading advocate for the views of corporate financial management. Its members hold policy-making positions as chief financial officers, chief accounting officers, treasurers, and controllers at companies from every major industry. FEI enhances member professional development through peer networking, career management services, conferences, research, and publications. Members participate in the activities of more than 65 Chapters in the U.S. FEI is located in Morristown, NJ. Visit http://www.financialexecutives.org for more information.

About Financial Education & Research Foundation, Inc.
Financial Education & Research Foundation (FERF) is the non-profit 501(c)(3) research affiliate of Financial Executives International (FEI), which produces professional education programs and objective financial research initiatives. FERF researchers identify key financial issues and develop impartial, timely research reports for FEI members and nonmembers alike, in a variety of publication formats. FERF relies primarily on voluntary tax-deductible contributions from corporations and individuals, and publications can be ordered at https://www.financialexecutives.org/Research.aspx.

About NABA
The National Association of Black Accountants (NABA, Inc.) is a nonprofit membership association dedicated to bridging the opportunity gap for Black professionals in the accounting, finance, and related business professions. Representing more than 200,000 black professionals in these fields, NABA advances people, careers, and the mission by providing education, resources, and meaningful career connections to both professional and student members, fulfilling the principle of our motto: Lifting as We Climb.


Geo Week 2022 Exhibit Floor is Sold Out & Live Event Going Forward Feb 6-8 in Denver

Organizers of Geo Week, the single powerhouse event that champions the coming together of geospatial technologies and the built world, have announced that the show floor is officially sold out. An impressive list of more than 140+ exhibitors from around the globe will exhibiting at the 2022 event, which will take place in person February 6th – 8th, 2022 at the Colorado Convention Center, Denver CO.

“After an extraordinary time apart, we’re excited to define the newest iteration of Geo Week: the coming together of AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, along with partners events ASPRS Annual Conference, MAPPS Winter Conference, and USIBD Annual Symposium,” said Lee Corkhill, Group Director at Diversified Communications, organizer of the event. “Geospatial and built world professionals are eager to be back together in person, as evidenced by the sold-out exhibit floor, strong registration numbers, and a palpable excitement among the industry insiders we’re speaking with. There’s no substitute for the learnings, connections, and growth that occur at a live event, and we’re thrilled to be bringing the industry together again.”

The list of exhibitors who will be showcasing best-in-class AEC, 3D and geospatial/lidar technology is growing daily, and includes these organizations:

  • 3D TARGET SRL
  • 3DEO, Inc.
  • Advanced Scientific Concepts LLC
  • Aerial Response Solutions
  • COM
  • Aero-Graphics Inc.
  • Aerometrex
  • Agisoft
  • AIRtec
  • AirWorks
  • AmericaView
  • Applanix Corporation
  • Applied Imagery
  • ASPRS
  • ASTRA Lite, Inc.
  • cloud
  • ATL Americas | Yuneec
  • Avatour
  • AVEVA Inc.
  • Axis GeoSpatial, LLC
  • Bad Elf
  • Balko Tech
  • BayesMap Solutions, LLC
  • Blue Marble Geographics
  • CHC Navigation
  • Cintoo US Inc.
  • Civil + Structural Engineer
  • ClearEdge3D
  • Clirio, Inc.
  • CompassData Inc.
  • Cupix
  • DAT/EM Systems International
  • Datum
  • Dewberry
  • DIELMO 3D S.L.
  • DJI Creative Studio, LLC
  • DroneDeploy
  • Dynamic Aviation
  • Eagleview Technologies
  • Emesent
  • ESRI
  • e-Survey
  • FARO Technologies, Inc.
  • Ferris State University
  • Field of View LLC
  • Frontier Precision
  • G2 Airborne Systems
  • G73 Data Solutions
  • General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc.
  • Geo Week Sales Booth
  • GEO1
  • GeoCue Group
  • Geodetics, Inc.
  • Geo-Plus
  • GeoSLAM Ltd
  • Geospatial World
  • Geosun Navigation Technology
  • GreenValley International
  • Harris Aerial
  • Hesai Technology
  • Hexagon
  • Hixon Mfg. & Supply Co.
  • HTS Advanced Solutions LLC
  • iGUIDE
  • Imajing s.a.s.
  • iMerit
  • Impulseradar
  • Informed Infrastructure
  • Inside Unmanned Systems
  • International Code Council
  • ISPRS 2022
  • ITRES Research Limited
  • iXBlue
  • Jakarto
  • Kaarta
  • KELYN Technologies
  • Keystone Aerial Surveys
  • L3Harris
  • Laserscanning Europe GmbH
  • Lead’Air
  • Leading Edge Geomatics
  • LIDARUSA
  • MAPPS
  • Merrick & Company
  • Microdrones
  • Mosaic
  • MSI (Hardware)
  • Multicopter Warehouse
  • National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA)
  • NavVis US, Inc.
  • Nearmap
  • NV5 Geospatial
  • Omega Optical, LLC
  • Outsight
  • Oxford Technical Solutions (OxTS)
  • Pavemetrics Systems Inc.
  • Phase One INDU
  • Phoenix LiDAR Systems
  • Pix4D SA
  • PLW Modelworks
  • PointCab GmbH / Laserscanning Europe
  • PointFuse
  • Prevu3D
  • Prostar Geocorp
  • AI
  • RESolute
  • Revizto
  • RIEGL USA Inc.
  • Sanborn Map Company
  • SBG SYSTEMS
  • Screening Eagle Technologies
  • Seiler Instrument Geospatial
  • SIMACTIVE INC.
  • Skycatch
  • Skyfront Corp.
  • Skyline Software Systems, Inc.
  • Smart Delta
  • Smart Drone
  • SOMAG AG JENA
  • Spatial Media/LIDAR Magazine
  • Surphaser/Basis Software, Inc.
  • Synergy 360
  • Teledyne Geospatial
  • TerraGo Technologies
  • Terrasolid Ltd
  • TopoDOT
  • Trimble
  • UMC, Inc.
  • University of Florida
  • US Geological Survey
  • USIBD
  • Vectornav Technologies
  • VeriDaaS
  • Vexcel Imaging
  • Voxelgrid
  • Voxelmaps
  • VRMesh
  • Wingtra
  • Woolpert
  • xyHt Magazine
  • YellowScan
  • Z+F USA, Inc.

Event Features

140+ Exhibitors: More than 140 vendors have confirmed booths and will be showcasing the newest geospatial and built world technologies. Attendees seeking commercial applications of 3D technologies, innovations in the built environment, advanced airborne and terrestrial remote sensing solutions, or looking ahead to the future of the industry will find the latest and greatest geospatial and built world solutions under one roof on the Geo Week Exhibition Floor.

Robust conference programming: Geo Week boasts a powerful conference program that will detail practical applications, best practices, and innovative approaches to complex projects. Professionals rooted in AEC, 3D technology or geospatial/lidar or a combination of these disciplines, will find the practical education needed for projects now and a look at what’s to come. Every Geo Week conference pass will give access to ALL Geo Week sessions, with the option to add the ASPRS Annual Conference and USIBD Annual Symposium access at a discounted rate.

150 Speakers: Across the three disciplines under the Geo Week umbrella – AEC, 3D technology and Geospatial/Lidar – Geo Week has gathered an impressive lineup of 125+ speakers from a wide range of disciplines who are leaders in their respective fields. Attendees can learn from and connect with the best, including innovators from Draper, Microsoft, USGS, Planet, EndeavorXR, NASA and many more!

Co-location partners: Geo Week is proud to host partner events, including ASPRS Annual Conference, MAPPS Winter Conference and USIBD Annual Symposium, providing additional opportunities to learn and connect.

Health & Safety

Diversified Communications, organizer of Geo Week, is committed to the health and safety of its customers, partners, speakers, and staff. With the guidance of event industry associations UFI, AEO, and SISO, Diversified Communications has adopted the All Secure Standards.

In addition to this set of best practices, each Diversified Communications event will follow the recommendations from public health officials, federal, state, and local authorities, and venues.

Proof of vaccination or a negative test proof will be required for all Geo Week 2022 participants. In addition, masks will be required for all exhibitors and attendees.

Visit the Geo Week 2022 Health & Safety FAQs page for more information on specific protocols.

About Geo Week

Geo Week is part of a network of events and media for the global geospatial and built markets organized by Diversified Communications, a leading organizer of conferences, trade shows, and online media with 15 years in the technology arena. Geo Week, taking place February 6-8, 2022, is the new brand name of previously stand-alone events AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, and reflects the increased integration between the built environment, advanced airborne/terrestrial technologies, and commercial 3D technologies. Powerful partnership events will also take place at Geo Week, including ASPRS (American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing), MAPPS and USIBD (US Institute of Building Documentation). Diversified Communications also produces Geo Week E-Newsletter, SPAR 3D E-Newsletter, AEC Next –E-Newsletter, GeoBusiness Show (UK), Digital Construction Week (UK), Commercial UAV Expo, and Commercial UAV News. For more information, visit www.geo-week.com.

Questions?

Lora Burns, Geo Week Marketing Manager, LBurns@divcom.com


Sandy Packo of American Indian College Named a First Peoples Fund Fellow

Sandy Packo (Iñupiaq), College Readiness Program Administrator at the American Indian College Fund, was named an inaugural Education Fellow for the First Peoples Fund’s We the Peoples Before 25th Anniversary Celebration of Native Cultural Expression and Sovereignty event. Scheduled for February 3-6, 2022, at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., the celebration will feature performances, workshops, film screenings, cooking demonstrations, and discussions. It will also include a multi-disciplinary performance in the prestigious Eisenhower Theater.

Emmy Her Many Horses (Sicangu/Oglala Lakota), Program Manager of Special Initiatives at the First Peoples Fund which sponsors the event, said the idea for the fellowships came about when the organization was looking for a way to share artists’ work from the We the Peoples Before events widely. “We wanted people to have the opportunity to interact with Indigenous peoples and communities who might not otherwise have had that chance. We thought, ‘What better way to do so that with schools and educators?’”

Fellows were chosen by looking at the gaps in where and how Indigenous youth learn about Indigenous people. The fellows come from a diverse group of educators who represent communities in the lower 48 as well as “the histories and knowledge of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian communities,” Her Many Horses said.

Packo, a lifelong educator, has worked for ten years as a music teacher in Colorado and Oregon, where she currently resides while working remotely for the College Fund. She also has experience as a culture bearer working at the Alaska Native Heritage Center in her hometown of Anchorage.

Shortly before joining the College Fund, Sandy said she examined her career and asked herself what she really wanted to do. She knew at a young age she wanted to go into the education field but narrowing down the subject she wanted to teach was difficult; she liked writing, music, and science. “Music won out and that is what my degree is in,” she said. While studying for her Master of Arts degree in teaching at the University of Alaska-Anchorage, her interests continued to expand. The College of Education recognized her for excellence in diversity, equity, and inclusion, and she began to pursue work in the subject further during her 10-year career as a teacher. From this, a new calling was born, one which would eventually lead her to the College Fund. In her new role, she is interested in ways educators can increase visibility for Native students and help them feel included in the classroom, which is inspired by her own experiences as a student when she sometimes felt undervalued and underestimated by some of her own teachers.

Like many people during the pandemic, Packo began to examine her career and explore whether she was applying her skills in the best way while also considering what she really wanted and how she could best make an impact. “For many years I had the desire to come back and serve the American Indian and Alaska Native community, and I have long wanted to be a culture-bearer and connect my experience with that second calling. I looked for a new career that was both a good fit and where I could be true to myself.” She mused it was COVID that pushed her to take a leap of faith. She applied for the position at the College Fund around the same time she applied for the fellowship. She was chosen for both.

Packo hopes to make a lasting impact on Native and non-Native students in K-12 classrooms who have a wide level of experiences learning about Indigenous histories and peoples in America. “All kids should have a chance to expand their understanding of the world around them. The world is a big place! The more experiences they have will help us as a nation move past objectifying Indigenous people… The project also offers Native students a chance to feel visible, to learn about their own communities, and to develop a sense of belonging and a chance to visualize leadership roles and careers for themselves…I hope that it brings healing.”

To learn more about the celebration and for a full event schedule, please visit wethepeoplesbefore.org.

About We the Peoples Before Event—This multidisciplinary performance event will take place February 3-6, 2022, in the prestigious Eisenhower Theater. Executive Produced by Lori Pourier (Oglala Lakota) with Consulting Producer Marc Bamuthi Joseph and Directed by Roberta Uno with original music, the main stage production will feature a multi-media, multi-genre experience of Indigenous hip hop, dance, spoken word, and poetry that celebrates and honors the language, art, culture, creativity, storytelling, knowledge, and truths of Native communities. Educational materials for classroom distribution across the U.S. will be available after the event, which was designed to engage thousands of students and bring Indigenous culture, history, and stories to the forefront of American education.

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 32 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $15.5 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2020-21. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $259 million in scholarships, program, and community support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


New Poll Highlights Small Business Healthcare Policy Priorities, Calls for Focus on Economic Recovery

The Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council (SBE Council) and the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC) recently released the results of a poll examining the top policy concerns among the small business community and highlighting the need for Congress to focus on policies that aid economic recovery. Key takeaways from the poll, conducted by Morning Consult, include:

  • 41% of small business owners (SBOs) say economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic should be one of Congress’ top priorities across the board.
    • 72% of SBOs agree the pandemic has already made things hard enough for small businesses and they cannot afford to have government policies that disrupt day-to-day business.
    • Nearly 8-in-10 SBOs agree healthcare reform that adds new costs for small businesses is high-risk and would add another burden to recovering businesses.
  • More than 9-in-10 SBOs say Congress’ top healthcare priority should be policies that address the rising cost and dwindling coverage of health insurance.
    • In fact, 71% of SBOs want Congress to focus more on reducing the overall cost of healthcare rather than focusing just on drug pricing.
    • Specifically, one third of small business owners are most concerned with addressing the cost of health insurance premiums—the top answer for healthcare priorities.
  • 90% of SBOs agree that continued research and innovation is vital to the country’s prosperity.
  • Nearly 9-in-10 also believe U.S. leaders should be anticipating and encouraging the need for research and development of new treatments and medicines.

SBE Council President & CEO Karen Kerrigan said: “The disruptive economic impact of the pandemic continues to disproportionately impact small businesses, and Congress must be attuned to their challenges to help them compete, recover and thrive. Our new survey with the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce provides a roadmap for relevant policymaking that will help small business owners, particularly with rising healthcare costs and how these threaten their ability to support their employees and businesses in this challenging environment. The year-over-year increases in health coverage costs are unsustainable and Congress must listen to America’s small business owners and advance smart economic reforms and market-oriented healthcare solutions that promote affordability, innovation and choice. During the holiday recess, we urge members of Congress to reach out and listen to small business owners to ensure they are acting on policies that support their recovery rather than creating more burdens for them to navigate.” USHCC President & CEO Ramiro A Cavazos said: “The past year and a half have been an uphill battle for our nation’s small businesses, particularly those in marginalized communities that disproportionately felt the brunt of this public health crisis but have continued to persevere. Policymakers must do everything they can to give small businesses the support they need, starting by listening to their needs that Congress must address such as economic recovery, rising healthcare costs, building a skilled workforce, and dwindling insurance coverage—without adding or creating more burdens or costs for the small business community.” About the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council SBE Council is nonpartisan advocacy, research and education organization dedicated to protecting small business and promoting entrepreneurship. For 27 years, SBE Council has worked on and advanced a range of private sector and public policy initiatives to strengthen the ecosystem for strong startup activity and small business growth. Visit www.sbecouncil.org for additional information. About the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce The United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC) actively promotes the economic growth, development, and interests of more than 5 million Hispanic-owned businesses. The USHCC team embodies the patriotic spirit and core mission of fostering the growth of American’s business community. Learn more at https://www.ushcc.com/.


Ying McGuire, CEO and President of NMSDC, Named Member of the SBA’s Council on Underserved Communities by Administrator

The U.S. Small Business Administrator Isabella Casillas Guzman recently named Ying McGuire, CEO and President of the National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC), to serve on the reconvened Council on Underserved Communities (CUC) authorized under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA).

Under newly-appointed Chair, John W. Rogers, Jr, Founder and Co-CEO of Ariel Investments, Ying McGuire, CEO & President, NMSDC and the CUC will work to further the equity priorities of the Biden-Harris Administration by making programmatic and policy recommendations to Administrator Guzman and the SBA to increase access and opportunity across SBA’s programs and initiatives to help level the playing field for all of America’s entrepreneurs. With a focus on serving minority-owned businesses, NMSDC is uniquely positioned to help the SBA in achieving its equity goals and deepening its relationships with Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs).

“It is an honor and a privilege to serve on the SBA’s Council on Underserved Communities. The work that we do will be imperative to improve and strengthen equity among women, veteran-, and minority-owned businesses. We have a once in a lifetime opportunity to rebuild our nation’s economy and close the racial wealth gap – and there is unprecedented momentum from the private and public sectors to eliminate disparities. Because of this, I am excited about our future, and the critical and vital role Small Businesses in underserved communities will play in stimulating economic change,” said Ying McGuire.

“I look forward to relaunching the CUC and working with Chairman John Rogers, Ying McGuire and our other newly-appointed members to support President Biden’s commitment to equity as we build our economy back better,” said Administrator Guzman. “An economic recovery for all of us means that we must do everything we can to help all of our small business and innovative startups emerge from the pandemic stronger and more resilient; and SBA is committed to ensuring our underserved entrepreneurs can access capital, markets, and networks to grow their businesses.”

Drawing from the nation’s most diverse and accomplished small business owners, community leaders, and advocates, Administrator Guzman’s CUC membership represents the voices and interests of America’s diverse small business owners, including those in disadvantaged groups such as women and communities of color. Together, the CUC’s members will work to promote public investment and policy formation to address the barriers facing underserved small businesses.

NMSDC has made a tremendous impact on Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) and has been at the forefront of creating economic opportunities for communities of color for 50 years. NMSDC certified minority-owned businesses generated $400 Billion annual economic output, created, and sustained $2.2 million jobs. We are witnessing a truly remarkable moment in U.S. history, during which private and public enterprises are demonstrating an earnest commitment to inclusivity and diversity in the economy – from education initiatives to workforce development, hiring, contracting, and supporting entrepreneurship.

Read more about Ying McGuire’s fellow CUC members in the SBA’s full release here. Additional information about the CUC can be found at www.sba.gov/CUC.

The SBA will announce CUC additional members in the coming weeks as well as the official meeting dates.

About the Council on Underserved Communities

Initially established in 2010, the Council on Underserved Communities provides advice, ideas, and opinions on SBA programs, services, and issues of interest to small businesses in underserved communities. The 20 member federal advisory committee serves as an essential connection between the SBA and underserved small businesses to work towards creating new and insightful initiatives to spur economic growth, job creation, competitiveness, and sustainability across all communities.

About NMSDC

The National Minority Supplier Development Council Inc.® (NMSDC®) is one of the country’s leading corporate membership organizations with a national office in New York, 23 affiliated councils across the country, and 5 global affiliates. NMSDC is committed to advancing Asian, Black, Hispanic and Native American suppliers in a globalized corporate supply chain by matching its more than 15,000 certified minority-owned businesses to a vast network of corporate members who wish to purchase their products, services and solutions. Our 1,500 national and regional corporate membership includes many of the largest public and privately-owned companies, as well as healthcare companies, colleges and universities.


USPAACC Holds Virtual CelebrASIAN Business Development Conference Part 2

The US Pan Asian American Chamber of Commerce Education Foundation (USPAACC) held its virtual CelebrASIAN Business Development Conference Part 2 as part of its continuing efforts to ensure that Pan Asian American and other diverse businesses grow and thrive in the post-pandemic marketplace.

The first part of CelebrASIAN was held in early June, also using a virtual platform.

The Conference theme, “Synergy Forward,” reflected the collective momentum that is built on trust, togetherness, and partnership.

The 3-day Conference, held November 8 to 10, kicked off with a fireside chat with Wells Fargo CEO and President Charlie Scharf and USPAACC National President & CEO Susan Au Allen. The two discussed a range of issues, including the bank’s diversity and inclusion programs, and how they could help businesses owned by minorities and diverse groups achieve robust growth.

The Synergy Forward Panel was also held, where the 9 leaders representing the country’s top minority and diverse business organizations – Disability:IN; National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC); National Veteran-Owned Business Associations (NaVOBA); The National Veteran Business Development Council (NVBDC); US Black Chambers, Inc. (USBC); United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC); US Pan Asian American Chamber of Commerce Education Foundation (USPAACC); and The Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) – gathered to discuss key issues on supplier diversity, inclusion, and certification.

The panelists also discussed the value to corporations of partnering with their respective organizations, measuring supplier diversity impact, and creating synergy among the organizations to benefit their unique constituents.

The Conference also held the popular CTO/CIO Forum, Employment Business Resource Group (EBRG) Caucus, Business Express, Business Development Roundtable workshop, “What’s Your Pitch?” national innovation competition, Scholarship Awards, and the Synergy Awards Ceremony.

“We will continue to work hard to further strengthen the synergy created from our shared values and build more invaluable connections: people-to-people, business-to-business, and organization-to-organization,” said USPAACC National President & CEO Susan Au Allen. “Together, we will build a foundation for stronger ties that reflect diversity, inclusion, equality, as well as mutual strategic and business interests.”

On the last day of CelebrASIAN, Allen announced a new USPAACC program, “Supplier Diversity Champions,” that will recognize corporations that show percentage increase in their supplier diversity spend.

This growth-based initiative has been in development for the past couple of years, according to Allen, and it was President Biden’s Executive Order 13985 that has propelled USPAACC to officially announce the program.

For more information about USPAACC and CelebrASIAN Business Development Conference, visit uspaacc.com or celebrasianconference.com


LULAC Female Dynamism Takes Center Stage At The First National Event In 20 Months

Washington, DC – LULAC Institute’s National Women’s Conference began with a who’s who political starting line-up of elected officials, appointed government officials, and hundreds of the top Latino influencers in the U.S. and Puerto Rico, all of them female. The conference theme is “Confronting Adversity, Overcoming Obstacles Through Resilience and Perseverance,” a tribute to LULAC’s triumph in holding its first national assembly in more than 20-months, the most extended period without a gathering of its members in the 92-year history of the organization. The conference is a prelude to the 2022 LULAC National Convention in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

“We have broken all turnout predictions and exceeded our goal by more than 300 percent!” exclaimed Elsie Valdes-Ramos, LULAC National Board Officer and Vice-President for Women. “We are here to make sure that the voice of women is heard loud and clear across the nation and reaching millions of American citizens in Puerto Rico. Joining the women of LULAC are female mayors, cabinet secretaries, and many people of the island, along with our friends everywhere, including men, for this historic first where not even the pandemic could extinguish our faith, our spirit, or our strength in unity.

Moreover, we are here to extend a hand to all the women who could not be here for various reasons. For the women who did not join us because they think they do not have the education or have the status of those here, I say to them: ‘This conference is for every woman, whether she is at home or has a job outside the house.’ There are women not with us today because of economic circumstances, distance, or a man telling them, ‘why do you want to be there?.’ We say to all women: we will share the message of empowerment with any man, couple, significant other, or whoever you love. The essential news to share is that I am a woman and am the vital force of power in this nation!” added Valdes-Ramos.

Ralina Cardona, National Board Officer and Vice-President for the Northeast, reminded the audience: “This pandemic has brought to light what the women in our community have always been doing. Not what (we) can do, but what we have always been doing. The pandemic brought forth the phrase ‘essential worker.’ We had never heard that before, the essential worker. The essential workers are our skin color, family, fathers, mothers, brothers, and sisters. They keep this country moving forward, fed, healthy, and our hospitals clean, and they are mostly women. We need to celebrate what we have done and teach the rest of our community to stand up. Our responsibility to our community is to make sure that they are there and we are there for them,” said Cardona.

Domingo Garcia, LULAC National President, took the podium and issued a solid challenge to America’s leaders in Congress. He urged its elected members to hear the loud call-to-action by conference attendees on stopping violence against women. “It is always wrong for a man to hit a woman. And you know what’s worse? For a sitting Congressman like Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) to threaten the life of a Latina congresswoman from New York City, Alexandra Ocasio Cortez! That’s not right. That’s a political coward and an intellectual dwarf. We’re asking Congress today that he be censured and expelled from the Congress of the United States of America. Threatening women and hitting women is wrong at every level, whether that’s at home or in the Capitol of the United States of America, and should not be tolerated by men, Republicans, or Democrats.”

A welcome reception was held earlier in the day for the elected and appointed leaders attending the conference. Caridad Pierluisi is Special Envoy, and Assistant to the Governor of Puerto Rico, Pedro Pierluisi. Ms. Pierluisi, the governor’s sister, serves ad honorem without a salary or benefit and brought a message to conference attendees on his behalf. “We are here as a delegation of women government cabinet members, mayors, and leaders of essential agencies to show the contributions we are making in all aspects and service to everyone.”

“We want people in the United States to know that Puerto Rico is a Latino state that will contribute to the entire economy, the fight for all rights, and we are working together. Puerto Ricans are U.S. citizens, just like every American on the continent. The people of Puerto Rico have spoken in an election. They made a valid decision, which was certified, and it says the majority wants to be part of the United States. We want the same responsibilities and benefits that every other American citizen has,” added Pierluisi.

Also present was Senator Nitza Moran Trinidad, an elected official who represents constituents in the island’s northeast region, including San Juan, a city with more than 335,000 people. “We are very excited to be part of a movement of Latinas working together for equality and equity in all aspects of our society, including labor, social and economic. I think this is a great opportunity to highlight our positions and ensure that women keep moving upward in our times,” said Senator Moran Trinidad.

Foremost on the minds of many Latinos, both on the U.S. mainland and in Puerto Rico, is the economic recovery and rebuilding of the island in the wake of Hurricane Maria in September 2017, which claimed 3,000 lives and caused historic devastation. The natural disaster left more than $90 billion dollars in damage to critical infrastructure, including roadways, bridges, and other public service facilities. Swarms of destructive earthquakes followed Hurricane Maria and left thousands of families homeless. Eileen Velez-Vega is now leading the rebuilding. She is Secretary of Transportation and Public Works, the first woman ever to hold that position.

“Our priorities with the FEMA monies received until now are roadways, bridges, and drainage systems,” says Velez-Vega. “We started with 157 rebuilding projects, and we are now down to the final twenty projects to complete. Puerto Rico is receiving significant amounts of money to spend rebuilding emergency services first. Following this, we can now turn to permanent public works either in design phases or released for bids. The FEMA projects have taken about six months to complete designs, and we anticipate completing the work by mid-2022. People may not be seeing as much as they would like, but yes, we are completing projects.”

“My life has always been in transportation. I live to engineer in the Army and the private sector, including airports and pavement construction. Years of lack of road maintenance in Puerto Rico exacerbated the situation. Governor Pierluisi and I are committed to changing that because it does not make sense to plan great new works if we cannot maintain what we have. This is a beautiful opportunity for me as the first woman, and I will not be the last,” adds Velez-Vega.

About LULAC

The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is the nation’s largest and oldest civil rights volunteer-based organization that empowers Hispanic Americans and builds strong Latino communities. Headquartered in Washington, DC, with 1,000 councils around the United States and Puerto Rico, LULAC’s programs, services and advocacy address the most important issues for Latinos, meeting critical needs of today and the future. For more information, visit www.LULAC.org.


American Indian College Fund Launches “This Is Indian Country”

“This Is Indian Country,” a new visibility campaign by the American Indian College Fund, is launching this Native American Heritage Month. The provocative campaign is designed to increase awareness of and conversation about Indigenous people and issues at a time when Native people are still not seen and heard by most Americans. Last year there was a move towards national acknowledgment of the racial inequity that has been ignored, rewritten, or deleted entirely from history for 400 years. Despite this positive movement, Indigenous people and cultures remain largely out of sight and out of mind. They were undercounted in the U.S. Census, were undertreated during Covid, and continue to be underreported when it comes to murdered and missing Indigenous people. Yet Indigenous people are Americans and Indigenous culture is American culture. People live in places with names like Manhattan, Minneapolis, or Chicago; vacation in Montauk, and swim in Malibu. But they can’t out of ignorance—or won’t out of guilt—discuss the people whose lands they occupy. This campaign invites America to not only name check the rivers, lakes, schools, sports teams, and every single cabin at summer camp, but more importantly, understand Native people are here and acknowledge their contributions and their right to be fully visible and have their voices heard. The American Indian College Fund is launching “This Is Indian Country” to ensure Americans think about Indigenous people every time they talk about them. Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “For the narrative of American history to be inclusive and for Indigenous people to have equity in all areas of American life, our neighbors must know that we are here and acknowledge that there is work to be done to build a better and more equal society. The ‘This Is Indian Country’ campaign is intended to be an entry point for all people to greater understanding across the United States. Through this entry point, all people can learn about the rich, diverse cultures of the original people of what is now the United States, and all people can take action to create a more just society. We can be united in our quest for abundant lives for ourselves and for future generations. We believe in education, both for the knowledge that education provides and for the opportunity it presents. We invite all learners to join us in this quest.” The campaign was created in partnership with advertising agency Wieden Kennedy, a 30+ year partner and collaborator with the College Fund. It soft-launched with a full-page public service announcement in The New York Times print edition on Indigenous Peoples’ Day. The full campaign is debuting this November, Native American Heritage Month. A website, series of films, social, print, and out-of-home public service announcements are geared to educate, inspire, and acknowledge people nationwide, including the American history, cities and monuments that depended on Indigenous people’s contributions.

  • This Is Indian Country“Indian Country” is an official legal term, noted in numerous Supreme Court opinions and referenced in multiple areas of federal law. The term has been used in treaties, policies, and laws that ordered Indigenous assimilation and erasure. Yet, Indian Country is more than just a legal phrase. Indian Country is in the words we speak on reservations and the stories Native people tell. It is in community. It is empowerment. This term may have been used against Native people, but it has been reclaimed.
  • ManhattanNew York City currently has the largest urban population of Native Americans in the United States. The presence of Indigenous people is evident in what is arguably the world’s greatest city and exists in everything, right down to the history of its Indigenous name.
  • Democracy, Indian CountryThe Iroquois Confederacy was united by the Great Law of Peace in 1722. The Stacked Government model of separate nations united for common good planted the seed for representative democracy in the United States. Yet, it is white leaders that are memorialized with monuments and in history books.

Over the years, for each College Fund campaign, W+K has made use of its relationships with generous media partners and legendary artists to produce sophisticated, cutting-edge advertising on a pro-bono budget. For “This Is Indian Country” W+K tapped television and film director Joe Pytka, who has played a pivotal role in the College Fund’s advertising campaigns for several decades. The film “Democracy, Indian Country” was also co-directed by Indigenous filmmaker Robin Máxkii (Mohican), a Wieden+Kennedy copywriter who worked on the campaign, alongside Wieden+Kennedy art director Samantha Perry. “We wanted to create something simple, provocative, and above all, empowering, which meant avoiding stereotypes that often exploit Indigenous pain, reduce cultures to background production design, or wield dehumanizing slogans. We are over begging people to acknowledge Natives as people. There is such a power in laying it out boldly with no ambiguity. These are Indigenous words. This is Indigenous truth,” Máxkii and Perry said in a joint statement. “I love the graphic nature of ‘This Is Indian Country.’ The very short, simple spots are special, too. They make their point in an imaginative and powerful way,” said the campaign’s director and filmmaker, Joe Pytka. “I’m grateful that I have been privileged to be involved in College Fund campaigns over the years, as these issues have become very close to my heart.” Individuals and organizations can support the movement for Indigenous recognition, representation, and equity by using resources and materials available at ThisIsIndianCountry.com. About Wieden+Kennedy Wieden+Kennedy is an independent, privately held global creative company with offices in Amsterdam, Delhi, London, New York City, Portland, São Paulo, Shanghai, and Tokyo. We believe in the power of creativity and influence to solve problems, build brands, change companies, and impact culture, something we have been fortunate to do for almost four decades as partners to some of the world’s best-known companies. www.wk.com About The American Indian College Fund The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 32 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $15.5 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students last year. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $259 million in scholarships, program, and community support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


LULAC Calls Confirmation Historic Of First Latino U.S. Census Director

The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) applauded the Senate confirmation Thursday of Robert Santos to serve as Director of the U.S. Census Bureau. Santos is a third-generation Mexican-American from San Antonio, Texas. He will lead the agency responsible for providing critical population data to shape the nation’s federal policies and programs. Santos became the first Latino appointed to head the Census Bureau in its 119-year history since becoming a federal agency, although the first count of the nation’s population dates to 1790. “Our country saw what happened with the 2020 Census count under President Trump and how he weaponized it against our community,” says Domingo Garcia, LULAC National President. “The Census Bureau and the American people deserve to have someone who is an impartial statistics scientist, instead of a politician interfering with the agency’s important work. We congratulate Robert, who began his journey as a student at a community college in San Antonio, went on to achieve undergraduate and graduate degrees, and then built a 40-year career in policy research. He has pledged to lead the agency with scientific independence and integrity. LULAC looks forward to working with him.” Santos is Vice-President and Director at the Urban Insitute, a Washington, DC research organization. His bio notes, “His expertise spans quantitative and qualitative research design, sampling, survey operations, and statistical analysis, and his specialty areas include undocumented immigrants and other disadvantaged populations. Santos has worked across a wide range of policy areas, including education, health, immigration and refugees, environmental issues, housing discrimination, travel behavior, and elections. “Texas LULAC is very proud of Mr. Santos’ stellar career and this appointment because it proves what hard work, dedication, and talent in our community can achieve,” says Rodolfo Rosales Jr., Texas LULAC State Director. “As importantly, his life experience ensures that our country’s Census Bureau will have a career policy research expert as the permanent director. He has pledged not to be swayed by the political winds. His words are a commitment that all Americans can respect and should have, especially when diversity is changing the face of our country. At stake are billions of dollars in federal budget programs as well as making sure we have equal representation in government,” he added. About LULAC The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is the nation’s largest and oldest civil rights volunteer-based organization that empowers Hispanic Americans and builds strong Latino communities. Headquartered in Washington, DC, with 1,000 councils around the United States and Puerto Rico, LULAC’s programs, services and advocacy address the most important issues for Latinos, meeting critical needs of today and the future. For more information, visit www.LULAC.org.


Global MindED Honors Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of American Indian College Fund, with a 2021 Inclusive Leader Award

Photo: Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO, American Indian College Fund, winner of GlobalMindED’s 2021 Inclusive Leader Award in non-profits. American Indian College Fund President and CEO Cheryl Crazy Bull was named a GlobalMindED 2021 Inclusive Leader on November 3 during a virtual awards ceremony. More than 3,000 viewers watched as GlobalMindED’s 2020 Inclusive Leaders named the 2021 winners who serve as role models of Inclusion, Diversity, and Equity (IDE) across 15 major industry sectors. The ceremony highlighted each recipient individually and featured inspiring stories of perseverance and success. This year’s Inclusive Leaders rooted in the Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) communities were selected by GlobalMindED to honor each winner’s pioneering work, peer leadership, and influence among the first-generation college student population GlobalMindED serves. Upon accepting her award for service in non-profits at the 2021 GlobalMindED Inclusive Leader Awards Ceremony, Cheryl Crazy Bull said, “Justice happens when we are restored to the fullness life that our ancestors lived—rich with the abundance of resources, deep connections to land and family, and profound relations with Creation.” President Crazy Bull is a citizen of the Sicangu Lakota Nation and has served as President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund since 2012. A lifelong educator and community activist who grew up on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota, she has also been an advocate for Native American self-determination, the very foundation of sovereignty, her whole life. Her work ensures that Native voices, philosophies, and traditions are perpetuated through higher education and visibility, serving as the heart of the important work of building prosperity in Native communities for current and future generations. Growing up in an extended family rich with cultural influences and relationships, President Crazy Bull attributes her success to her identity as a Lakota woman which was steeped in growing up in her family surrounded by her community. She says her identity is rooted in women having status and influence based on traditional Lakota teachings. While still in high school, President Crazy Bull was given her Lakota name, Wacinyanpi Win, meaning They Depend on Her, because her grandmother observed her taking care of others by making sure their needs were met when the family and community gathered. President Crazy Bull says she has carried the belief in being someone that others can rely on and trust to be supportive throughout her life and believes that being relied on and trusted also means using her voice to speak out and to act. To see her portion of the presentation, visit https://collegefund.org/press-releases/global-minded-honors-cheryl-crazy-bull-president-and-ceo-of-american-indian-college-fund-with-a-2021-inclusive-leader-award/. About Global MindED— Global MindED is a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to closing the equity gap by creating a capable, diverse talent pipeline through connections to role models, mentors, and internships for least-resourced students, returning adults, First Gen to college, and the inclusive leaders who teach, work, and hire these students. GlobalMindED’s programs include its Inclusive Leader Awards program, a daily newsletter, a strong Summer Start Leadership program for college freshmen, monthly equity events, and an annual conference that will be held June 22-24, 2022, in Denver, Colorado. The Ph.D. Project strives to create a stronger, more diverse workforce. Through its unique model, the nonprofit organization’s Black/African American, Latinx/Hispanic American, and Native American members pursue business PhDs with the intent to become university faculty, teaching and guiding students who aspire to a career in business. El Pomar, a private, general-purpose foundation, accepts applications from 501(c)(3) organizations serving the state of Colorado in the areas of arts and culture, civic and community initiatives, education, health, and human services. About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 32 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $15.5 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2020-21. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $259 million in scholarships, program, and community support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


College Fund Hosts 35 Mile Walk Fundraiser for Native American Heritage Month!

November is Native American Heritage Month. There are more than 500 federally recognized Indian tribes in the United States. To help create greater awareness of the remarkable Indigenous histories, cultures, tribes, and how higher education can help these cultures and traditions continue, the American Indian College is launching a nationwide 35 Mile Walk Fundraiser, beginning November 1. Joining the event is free and is as easy to participate as visiting the College Fund’s Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/collegefund or at the event page at https://www.facebook.com/groups/3156451491301644/ and signing up for the event. Participants will receive a message on Facebook Messenger asking them to confirm an email address and zip code. From there, participants will be admitted to the private 35 Mile Walk Challenge Group, where they can create a fundraiser of their choice to benefit Native students through the American College Fund. Participants can set any monetary goal and raise the money in any way, but everyone must walk and log 35 miles—while sharing their stories and journeys on the group board along the way. The 35 Mile Walk Fundraiser event ends November 30. So don’t delay–grab your walking stick and sign up today to help Native students and promote visibility of Indigenous people! Sign up here at: The event is a week away and there are already 5,000 people in the community ready to walk, learn, and share! Enter here at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/3156451491301644/ About the American Indian College Fund The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 32 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $15.5 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2020-21. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $259 million in scholarships, program, and community support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


City Of Los Angeles Department of Public Works Launches Financial Assistance Program For Contractors

With the launch of a pilot program to provide better access to capital assistance, small and diverse firms looking to do business with City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works can overcome one of the most common barriers to competing for city contracts — lack of financing. City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works’ through PACE Financial Corporation and in conjunction with the Contractor Development and Bonding Program (CDABP), is offering financing to small contractors. The pilot program called the Contract Financing Assistance Program (CFAP), provides financing to small construction contractors to be used for meeting construction contract funding requirements. This new program aims to address the financing gap that affects many small and diverse construction contracting firms, which historically have been underserved by conventional lending institutions. The finance assistance program is designed to increase the pool of contractors enabled to compete and ensure wider access to opportunities at Department of Public Works. “Every hard-working entrepreneur in Los Angeles deserves an equal opportunity to thrive,” said John L. Reamer, Jr., Inspector of Public Works and Director of the Bureau of Contract Administration. “Through the CFAP program, we are another step closer to achieving a more equitable procurement process by breaking down historical barriers to funding and creating more access for small and diverse firms to compete for major contracts on Public Works projects.” CFAP funding offers benefits for both contractors and the City of Los Angeles Department. For contractors, the program provides an alternative to taking out personal loans or using high interest credit cards. Contractors receiving CFAP funds not only will build capacity to strengthen their businesses but can also use the program to help establish or enhance their credit history, making them more eligible for commercial lending. For City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works, the program aims to increase the number of qualified firms that can pursue contracting opportunities which can lead to receiving additional competitive bids. “Access to contract financing is a game-changer for small contractors in the public works arena,” said Ingrid Merriwether, President and Chief Executive Officer, Merriwether & Williams Insurance Services, Program Administrator. “The CFAP program directly aligns a funding source parallel to a contractor’s cost of performing the work, ensuring peace of mind for both the client and contractor.” Contractors applying for CFAP funds begin with an assessment of their capacity to meet a bid’s requirements before bidding on it. The assessment identifies what the contract cash flow requirements will be for contract costs such as project labor, materials, and other areas specific to the contract, with a pre-approval for funds issued upon the contractor’s successful completion. CFAP loans are ultimately approved following an awarded contract, with funds released for contract expenses as needed. Loans are issued at a fixed 6.25% annual percentage rate (APR), plus a 1% origination fee. Funding is available up to $250,000, but larger amounts can be considered on a case-by case basis. “Providing the region with contract funding support in partnership with City of Los Angeles and the Contractor Development and Bonding Program is a product of Public-Private Partnership innovation to help remedy the systemic lack of capital access to small and minority contractors,” said Kerry Doi, President and Chief Executive Officer, PACE Finance Corporation. The CFAP is a partnership with the City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works, PACE Finance Corporation and Merriwether & Williams Insurance Services. PACE Finance Corporation provides funding for the program and Merriwether & Williams administers the program with City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works. For more information about CFAP, contact Merriwether & Williams Insurance Services at (213) 258‐3000 or mwisinfo@imwis.com


AMAC Announces Eboni Wimbush as Its Next President & CEO

Eboni Wimbush headshot
Eboni Wimbush

Washington, DC (October 6, 2021)— After a prolonged national search and vetting process, the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is proud to announce Eboni Wimbush as its President & CEO. She will begin her new role at the end of this month. “I am honored to be selected as AMAC’s next President & CEO at such a pivotal moment in history. The organization connects my early passion, interest and education in aviation along with my dedication to creating a positive, lasting impact for women and disadvantaged communities. I am ready to serve and prepared to lead and position AMAC for the future, working with the AMAC Board of Directors and National Office to be the voice at the table and to create opportunities and economic mobility for our members.”—Eboni Wimbush, President & CEO, AMAC Eboni Wimbush most recently served as the Deputy Director of the Baltimore City Mayor’s Office of Children & Family Success. She was responsible for advancing all of the work across the agency including building and implementing the strategies and systems to operationalize the City’s $100 million eviction prevention program in response to the global pandemic as well as leading the agency’s contracting, human resources, grant compliance and equity strategy. Previously, Eboni served as Chief of Staff at Baltimore City Department of Transportation, where she was responsible for the Office of Communications, the Office of Legislative Affairs and External Affairs. Additionally, she served as a key advisor to the Director in overseeing the day-to-day management, operations and performance activities of the agency’s 1,250 employees and $250 million budget. Prior to joining Baltimore City and over a span of two decades, Eboni had a distinguished private sector career with Fortune 500 companies including FedEx Corporation, Johnson Controls and Siemens where she held leadership roles gaining a depth and breadth of knowledge and experience in developing and building energy infrastructure projects and delivering outcomes. Eboni holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Management from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. She resides in Alexandria, Virginia and is an active member of Alfred Street Baptist Church where she serves as the President of the College Ministry. Eboni is a proud parent of one son. “Eboni is no stranger to AMAC and brings a wealth of transportation and related leadership and management experience and education. I have been able to witness Eboni’s work over the last few years and am very excited to have her take the helm of AMAC. I am confident that she will bring exceptional leadership to the AMAC National Office and lead our efforts to execute AMAC’s mission. Furthermore, she will serve as a highly respectable and credible representative of AMAC throughout the membership and the industry.”—Ricky Smith, Chair, AMAC Board of Directors, and CEO, Baltimore/Washington Thurgood Marshall International Airport. About the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is the only national, non-profit trade association dedicated to advance the full participation of minorities and women in employment and contracting opportunities throughout the aviation and aerospace industries. Since 1984, AMAC has been at the forefront of nearly every national policy initiative impacting the participation of disadvantaged businesses in airport contracting. AMAC works consistently with Congress, the federal government, aviation trade associations and others as a resource for information, education, and guidance on business and employment matters. For more information, visit www.amac-org.com.


Top Performers Join Forces with American Indian College Fund for Free Online Indigenous Peoples DayConcert

First-Ever Entertainment Event Celebrating Indigenous Peoples, History, and Cultures to Air October 10 at 6:30 p.m. M.D.T. Mark your calendars! The American Indian College Fund is hosting a free streaming concert to celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day on Sunday, October 10, 2021, at 6:30 p.m. MDT. The event will feature performances by Native entertainers and artists allied with Native causes from across the nation. virtual concert poster with entertainers featured Performances and stories from students and performing artists will include Pink Martini, Portugal. The Man, Martha Redbone, Brooke Simpson, Indigo Girls, Sarah McLachlan, Frank Waln, The Ghost of Paul Revere, Jewel, and Nathaniel Rateliff. Special guests will include Robbie Robertson, Tea Leoni, Mandy Patinkin/Kathryn Grody, and Ziggy Marley. We will also hear from non-Indigenous friends and allies who create shared spaces and opportunities where Native perspectives are welcomed, heard, and valued, to create greater visibility and inclusion for Native people. Native students over the years have continually shared that one of the biggest challenges in their education and in their lives is that they do not feel that Native people are seen or heard. The American Indian College Fund believes education is the answer to creating better opportunities for Native people through access to a higher education. But it also knows that the world is not just or kind to Native American graduates. The College Fund is working to create a nation where Native people are visible, their voices are heard, and their contributions are valued. To see a full list of performers and to register for the free event, please visit https://collegefund.org/events/indigebration/. About the American Indian College Fund About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 32 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $15.5 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2020-21. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $259 million in scholarships, program, and community support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


LULAC Presents Presidential Medal To Parents Of Navy Seaman Brandon Caserta

Nation’s Largest and Oldest Latino Civil Rights Organization Vows to Step-Up Push for Passage of the Brandon Act Parents of Brandon Caserta accept award onstage with LULAC representative Washington, DC – The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) has presented the organization’s highest recognition to Patrick and Teri Caserta, parents of the 21-year-old Navy aircrew mate who took his life at Naval Station Norfolk. Caserta left the Navy seal training program after suffering an injury and expressed unhappiness that his career opportunities afterward were limited. His parents say their son was being repeatedly bullied, and his superiors failed to act when he displayed symptoms of depression. Caserta died on June 25, 2018, when he walked out on the flight line and jumped into a spinning helicopter tail rotor. The Caserta couple is now devoting their lives to the passage of the Brandon Act,, and say the legislation named after their son will help other servicemembers experiencing a medical crisis requiring psychological care without the fear of retaliation. The LULAC Presidential Medal presentation ceremony was held at the Texas LULAC State Convention in Austin, Texas as part of a special event to honor military veterans and active service members. “Patrick and Teri Caserta are courageous for sharing the tragic story surrounding their son’s loss,” said Domingo Garcia, LULAC National President. “Also, they are powerful in their determination to fight because they do not want other families to experience the nightmare they have, and so that our country’s men and women in military uniform do not have to endure the pain and humiliation Brandon did, up until the very day he could not any longer,” added Garcia. In accepting the LULAC Presidential Medal, Patrick Caserta said, “Our son loved the military and loved his country. What happened to him should have never happened and we are working to convince our elected officials in Congress that passing the Brandon Act will benefit our service members and the nation. If this is our son’s legacy, while the pain never goes away, we are forever grateful,” said Caserta. Teri Caserta, Brandon’s mother added, “Our son loved life and loved people because his gift was his sensitivity for others. Since he was a little boy, he loved helping those he saw going through difficulty or in need. At school, he would give away his lunch money so someone else could eat. Later, when he was older, he would help strangers on the streets. That was just his nature, and I am so glad that the trait most people remember about Brandon was his constant smile, the way he saw life,” she said. The Brandon Act is part of the Save Our Servicemembers Campaign which also highlights several important initiatives currently underway:

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About LULAC The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is the nation’s largest and oldest civil rights volunteer-based organization that empowers Hispanic Americans and builds strong Latino communities. Headquartered in Washington, DC, with 1,000 councils around the United States and Puerto Rico, LULAC’s programs, services and advocacy address the most important issues for Latinos, meeting critical needs of today and the future. For more information, visit LULAC.org.


LULAC has launched a toll-free hotline for the Vacunate Hoy Initiative

August 1, 2021, LULAC will be launching 1-877-MI-LULAC (1-877-615-8522) to cover all of your COVID-19 related questions and needs. This landmark initiative will help guide callers to learn more about COVID-19, answer any questions about vaccinations, and provide general assistance regarding health, support services, and general referrals to local community resources. We hope to keep supplying the Hispanic community with critical information and resources to encourage the decision to get vaccinated. The hotline will be available 24 hours a day 7 days a week. Callers can speak to someone in English or Spanish to receive assistance. Additionally, our team will be on hand to help you schedule a vaccine at your nearest location as well as help provides transportation codes for Lyft through the generosity of our partners. For additional resources on COVID-19 and vaccines visit www.vacunatehoy.org


United Health Foundation Grants $430K to American Indian College Fund for Tribal Scholars Program

Program to Provide Native Students Health Scholarships to Help Grow the Native Health Workforce Denver, Colo., July 27, 2021— The United Health Foundation (UHF) is continuing its support to ensure Native American communities have access to urgently needed health care with a $430,000 grant to provide scholarships for American Indian and Alaska Natives studying in the health and dental care fields. The pandemic and its disproportionate impact on Native communities highlighted the importance of access to culturally responsive health care for underserved populations. The goal of the United Health Foundation Tribal Scholars Program is to increase the number of employable American Indian and Alaska Native healthcare graduates to work as primary care physicians, nurses, physician assistants, mental and behavioral health specialists, dentists, and pharmacists. Studies have long shown that American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) people experience poorer health status and suffer from greater rates of chronic disease such as diabetes mellitus and heart and respiratory diseases, while also having shorter lifespans than other groups, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health. The America’s Health Rankings Health Disparities Report (visit www.americashealthrankings.org) reveals many additional significant pre-pandemic disparities for Native Americans including food insecurity, severe housing and the rate of depression. And with the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic, Native communities suffered devastating results. Lack of dental care also leads to health problems in Native communities. Periodontal disease (gum infection) is associated with increased risks for cancer and cardiovascular disease. Studies also show that people with poor oral health and bad teeth are often stigmatized socially and when seeking employment, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. By providing American Indian and Alaska Native students with scholarships to earn degrees in health care, Indigenous graduates can provide people in their communities with personalized, culturally competent care. Scholarships will be offered to Native students beginning in 2021-22 and are renewable throughout scholars’ academic careers. Scholars will be undergraduate or graduate students, with a preference for undergraduates who are rising sophomores or higher and pursuing degrees in the above-referenced fields at tribal colleges and universities or mainstream colleges and universities. Interested students can learn more and apply at https://collegefund.org/scholarships. “We are honored to continue our partnership with the American Indian College Fund and support its work to create a more diverse health workforce by increasing the number of providers ready to deliver personalized, culturally competent care,” said Tracy Malone, President of the United Health Foundation. “We are proud to help aspiring health care professionals reach their dreams and support their communities.” Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “On behalf of the College Fund and our students, I want to acknowledge that not only do the United Health Foundation Scholarships support students, but this partnership improves the health and well-being of our families. We have rich cultural traditions that inform how to live healthy lives and it is through the education of our own people that we will be able to bring culturally competent health care to our communities. The United Health Foundation is a leader in addressing health disparities in ways that honor the knowledge of Indigenous people. We are honored to support their leadership.” About the United Health Foundation — Through collaboration with community partners, grants and outreach efforts, the United Health Foundation works to improve our health system, build a diverse and dynamic health workforce, and enhance the well-being of local communities. The United Health Foundation was established by UnitedHealth Group (NYSE: UNH) in 1999 as a not-for-profit, private foundation dedicated to improving health and health care. To date, the United Health Foundation has committed more than $500 million to programs and communities around the world. We invite you to learn more at UnitedHealthFoundation.org. About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


36th Annual AMAC Airport Business Diversity Conference: Honoring the Legacy, Perfecting the Present & Building for the Future Highlights

  AMAC Airport Directors’ 20/20 Vision Forum: Addressing the Economic and Health Impact of COVID-19 on the Aviation Industry The Airport Directors’ 20/20 Vision provided a relaxed environment for the diverse group of Airport Directors to explore and discuss the positive and negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on aviation operations, health, air service, economic development, job creation, tourism and trade. The forum was moderated by Marshall J. Taggart, Jr., Chair, AMAC Airport Leadership Collective / At-Large Director, AMAC Board of Directors / Former Executive Airport Director, Montgomery Regional Airport. Panelists included: Balram Bheodari, General Manager, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport; Mario Diaz, Airport Director, Houston Airport System; Cynthia Guidry, Vice Chair, AMAC Airport Leadership Collective / Director, Long Beach Airport; Ron Mathieu, President & CEO, Birmingham Airport Authority; Perry Miller, Vice Chair, AMAC Airport Leadership Collective / President & Chief Executive Officer, Richmond International Airport; and Jamie L. Rhee, Commissioner, Chicago Department of Aviation AMAC Catalyst Awards The AMAC Catalyst Awards honors AMAC members who have made outstanding contributions to further AMAC’s goals and mission. AMAC members were invited in advance to nominate individuals or organizations—award recipients were honored at the live virtual event. AMAC Advocate of the Year Award: Courtney Thornton, Executive Vice President, Corporate Strategy & Business Development, Hudson Group AMAC Airport of the Year Award: Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport AMAC Airport Concessions Innovation and Inclusion Award: Jackmont Hospitality AMAC Airport Design Innovation and Inclusion Award – Los Angeles World Airports AMAC Chairman’s Award: Angela Gittens, (Retired) Former Director General, Airports Council International AMAC Hall of Fame Award: Derryl Benton, Executive Vice President, Business Development, HMSHost AMAC Inclusive Leadership Award: SP Plus Airport Services AMAC Local Small Business Champion Award: William “Bill” Swift, Treasurer, AMAC Board of Directors / Owner, Business Traveler Services, Inc. and Swift Services, Inc. AMAC Small Business Partner Award: CI2 Aviation AMAC Foundation Celebrating Women in Aviation Bishop Vashti McKenzie keynoted this annual program that is designed to foster, promote and applaud the success of women in aviation and aerospace-related businesses and career achievements. This year’s honorees featured: AMAC Foundation Pinnacle Award: Myrna White, Assistant General Manager, Office of Public Affairs, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport AMAC Foundation Emerging Leader Award: Mori Russell, Business Development Manager, Concessions International AMAC Foundation Local Industry Leader Award: Tina Houston, Vice President, Metro Market Leader GA/AL for AECOM AMAC Legislative & Policy Updates Pete Buttigieg, Secretary, U.S. Department of Transportation provided remarks on the importance of minority businesses and commitment to the Biden Administration Infrastructure Plan. Maxine Waters, U.S. Representative, California 43rd Congressional District, also highlighted the importance of small and minority businesses. AMAC Emerging Leaders: Going Up! Crafting Your Elevator Pitch Pinky Cole, Founder and Owner of Slutty Vegan ATL provided valuable techniques on crafting your elevator pitch and positioning yourself/business for success. Save the Date! AMAC and the Chicago Department of Aviation will present the 37th Annual AMAC Airport Business Diversity Conference: Redefining Aviation Opportunities Together from June 20–22, 2022 in Chicago, IL. Please stay tuned for additional details at www.amac-org.com/annualconference.


American Indian College Fund Awards Four Tribal Colleges with Four-Year Computer Science Initiative Grants

Computer science education provides today’s college students the necessary skills and opportunities to thrive in today’s world. Yet American Indian and Alaska Native peoples are still and have been historically underrepresented in the computer science fields. To remedy that, the American Indian College Fund launched its Tribal College and University Computer Science Initiative to create new and expand existing computer science programs at higher education institutions serving American Indian and Alaska Native students to meet the community and workforce needs of Indigenous communities and to provide career opportunities for Native students in computer science fields. The four-year initiative will focus on faculty hiring and professional development; developing or enhancing computer science academic programs and curriculum at the TCUs; developing and participating in a community of practice activities; and participating in community engagement, sustained pathways, and/or student support through industry partner relationships. The College Fund selected the following four applicants to participate in the initiative. The TCUs and their programs include: • Bay Mills Community College (BMCC), located in Brimley, Michigan. BMCC’s program, Nanda-gikendan Waasimowini (seek to learn computers in Ojibwe), will develop an online Bachelor of Science degree in computer information systems with a computer science track that will be accessible across the country. BMCC will hire one additional full-time instructor to develop courses and two adjunct faculty to meet specific course needs. It will also support its current Computer Information Systems department chair/faculty member to obtain a graduate degree and relevant computer science education and training. BMCC students will receive hands-on experience in programming, project design, technical support, and will work to help BMCC create computer science awareness in the community. • The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA), located in Santa Fe, New Mexico, will launch its The IAIA Art of Computer Science program. IAIA will create an interdisciplinary computer science environment across degree programs using computer science courses/modules while supporting development of a gaming degree. It will also hire full-time, pro-rata, and adjunct faculty to teach, and contractors to develop computer science curriculum and assist other departments with integration of computer science education across disciplines. To ensure all faculty have proficient computer skills, IAIA will also support professional development for 35 permanent faculty to take basic computer science coursework to integrate computer science concepts and skills into their courses and programs of study. The Institute will implement community engagement projects for students to incorporate computer science education and awareness into their community internships work to help provide their communities with an understanding of the value computers and computer science skills in a culturally relevant way. • Navajo Technical University (NTU), located in Crownpoint, New Mexico, will launch its CSE@NTU-Computer Science Enhancement at NTU program to enhance current associate degrees in computer science programming by expanding the programs to the Bachelor of Science degree level. NTU will hire one additional full-time computer science faculty member to assist in teaching and developing the program. NTU will also support current computer science faculty and the new hire with professional development opportunities relevant to computer science education and will incorporate speaking opportunities for computer science industry experts and professionals to work with faculty, staff, and students. • Salish Kootenai College (SKC) in Pablo, Montana will launch its Increasing Computer Science Capacity at Salish Kootenai College program to offer computer science programs through the creation of a one-year certificate of completion in computer programming and to offer enhanced computer science coursework for SKC’s STEM disciplines. SKC will develop a path for the computer programming program’s sustainability through dual-enrollment opportunities for reservation high school students. The college will hire one additional full-time computer science faculty member to support dual-enrollment courses and courses within the proposed one-year certificate program and will support current and new faculty with professional development opportunities in culturally sustaining pedagogy, technical pedagogy, and specialized industry training relevant to computer science education and training. SKC will also host summer coding workshops and develop dual-enrollment computer science courses with at least two reservation high schools to enhance student exposure to computer science education and careers. Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “The self-determination of the Tribal people is closely aligned with our ability to adapt and make use of all the tools of modern society. I am reminded that as Native people that we have always valued using the tools created by others to make our lives better. My colleagues at the College Fund and I agree that computer science is one of those tools. Computer science is foundational to so many aspects of life today. Everything from information technology to entertainment to building a picture of the well-being of our communities is tied to our ability to use computer science to our advantage. We are excited that our TCUs will be able to increase their capacity and open doors to more career opportunities.” About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit collegefund.org.


American Indian College Fund Receives Unrestricted Gift from MacKenzie Scott Foundation

The American Indian College Fund, the national non-profit organization serving American Indian and Alaska Native college students and tribal colleges and universities, learned the MacKenzie Scott Foundation, headed by the billionaire novelist and philanthropist of the same name and her husband Dan Jewett selected it to receive an unrestricted gift. The College Fund provides Native American and Alaska Native students with greater access to a higher education and the support to succeed in college and in their careers.

 

The gift could not have come at a better time. The national college attainment gap of Native Americans is already less than half of that of other groups at 15% (compared to 32.1% of all other groups), according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

 

When the pandemic hit, it heightened existing barriers for Indigenous people to access education. Native communities were hit hardest by the virus due to limited access to health care or inadequate health care services; community members with more existing chronic health conditions; and much higher rates of poverty that result in greater rates of food and housing insecurity among Native students, according to the Tribal Colleges and Universities #RealCollege Survey and subsequent College Fund student surveys. When lockdowns shuttered Tribal nations, many colleges and universities transitioned to online classes, leaving many students in remote, rural reservation communities cut off due to lack of affordable technology resources and connectivity. And after Tribal economies based largely in the service industry closed leading to high rates of unemployment, it left many of the more than 50% of College Fund scholars who work full- or part-time and who are the sole family breadwinners without jobs.

 

Any one situation taken alone would be stark, but taken together, they resulted in the steepest national pandemic-related declines in college enrollment among first-time entering Native students in the fall of 2020, according to American Indian Higher Education Consortium data. Freshman enrollment was down 11% overall at TCUs and down 23% nationally at all colleges and universities.

 

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “This gift is timely and pivotal because, in combination with the generosity of our network of current and future supporters, we now have the capacity to grow greater opportunities for American Indian and Alaska Native communities and to create lasting change. MacKenzie Scott and Dan Jewett’s acknowledgement of our work is a testament to the important role of education to transform the lives of our students, their families, and communities.”

 

The College Fund is committed to eliminating the college attainment gap among Indigenous people and ensuring that every American Indian and Alaska Native student that dreams of a higher education can achieve that dream. The College Fund continues to appreciate and rely upon the support of every one of its current and future supporters to meet its goals to transform the lives of Indigenous students, their families, and their communities through a higher education.

 

About the American Indian College Fund: The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. Among Native students that graduate from tribal college graduates, a 2019 Gallup survey shows 74% work in careers in their communities in fields such as health care, education, business, and more. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Remembering Jimmy “Jim” Curtis Shorty

Jimmy “Jim” Curtis Shorty
Jimmy Curtis Shorty. Photo Courtesy of the Navajo Times

The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES)i is mourning the loss of Jimmy “Jim” Curtis Shorty, one of the original co-founders of AISES and a former member of the Board of Directors. Jim dedicated his life, and his legal and engineering career, to his people, the Navajo Nation. For six years, Jim directed the Native American Program in the College of Engineering (NAPCOE) at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque. NAPCOE is likely the first university-level program in the United States for Native students (some 30 at the time). Carol Metcalf-Gardipe, another instrumental AISES co-founder, was the first NAPCOE director, with Jim following in the mid-1970s. NAPCOE had a role in the early genesis of AISES, before there was any discussion about the formation of an organization for Native people in STEM. The story of AISES began when Al Qöyawayma read a short article in the Arizona Republic about NAPCOE, which brought him into contact with Carol and Jim, and ultimately A.T. Anderson and George Thomas. What soon followed was the formation of the American Indian Engineering Council, where Jim helped write the bylaws and formalize legal aspects of creating what would eventually become AISES as we know it today.

My remembrance of Jimmy C. Shorty by Dr. Bob Whitman

I first met Jimmy C. Shorty (Jim Shorty) when I returned to school for the fall semester in 1976. He was the new director of the Native American Program in the College of Engineering (NAPCOE) at the University of New Mexico (UNM). NAPCOE was the first program of its kind in an engineering school which was established solely to recruit and retain American Indian students in engineering. I worked for NAPCOE as a tutor and recruiter. He was my new boss but also became a good friend. He shared his experiences working in the Navajo Tribal government and in establishing AISES. When I graduated with my undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from UNM, Jim slipped me a brochure of an organization called the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. He had informed me that it was a new organization and that I could join it with a one-time membership fee, and I would be a member for life. I was very skeptical of this organization, so I did not act on it for over a year. In the summer of 1978, Jim submitted a request to my employer, IBM for my release time to teach basic mathematics to students in the NAPCOE summer institute. IBM granted the request and I returned to the University of New Mexico to teach a group of 28 American Indian students. This four-week summer institute set the basis for students to become familiar with the demands of being in engineering school. When I was elected to the AISES board of directors in 1983, Jim provided counsel and advice. When I was elected Chair of the Board of Directors of AISES, I relied on him to interpret the bylaws of the organization. These bylaws were largely drafted by him. Over the years, I would occasionally meet with Jim, usually at AISES conferences. He had many stories about his professional experiences. I feel that these stories set the basis for my mentoring. It was professional development that went well beyond the technical education I received as an engineering student. When I joined the electrical and computer engineering faculty at UNM in 1996, my first course I taught there was video recorded. Jim, who worked for Sandia National Labs, would coordinate the receiving of my video-recorded lectures for distribution to Sandia employees taking my course. Jim was one of only two American Indian bosses I had in my career and one of the few Navajo mentors in my professional development. He was a good friend who shared many Navajo jokes.

An Amazing Life Story

The third eldest of six siblings, Jim grew up in a humble environment and worked herding sheep in the gulches of Coyote Canyon, New Mexico. After graduating from St. Michael’s High School in 1957, he earned his BS in geology from St. Joseph’s College in 1961. After being honorably discharged by the U.S. Army, Jim attended the University of New Mexico where he received his PhD in law and worked as a geologist for the Navajo Nation Department of Water Resources. He was well-known within the Navajo Tribe, where he was a fluent speaker and served as an assistant to the president. While employed at Sandia National Laboratories, he worked as an educator and supervised various minority outreach efforts from 1983 to 2007 before retiring. Jimmy is survived by his wife of 54 years, Patricia Shorty, sons Richard and Patrick Shorty, two granddaughters, and four great-grandchildren. Jimmy was born April 15, 1937, in Rehoboth, N.M.; he peacefully passed away April 17, 2021, surrounded by his family. He believed strongly in the AISES mission who was generous with his knowledge, teachings, and who inspired thousands of students through his work. Jimmy will be honored during the memorial portion of the 2021 AISES National Conference in Phoenix in September.


AISES Named “2021 Top-Rated Nonprofit” by GreatNonprofits

AISES has been named a “2021 Top-Rated Nonprofit” by GreatNonprofits, the leading website for community recommendations of charities and nonprofits. “We are honored to be named a 2021 Top-Rated Nonprofit,” said Sarah EchoHawk, AISES CEO. “We are proud of our accomplishments this year, including hosting the first virtual Leadership Summit, welcoming the University of Wyoming Native American Program as an AISES college chapter, and launching the Native Financial Cents website.” The Top-Rated Nonprofit Award is based on the rating and number of reviews that AISES received from volunteers, donors, and supporters. “AISES is my family. These are my people. There are very few places where an American Indian Nerd feels welcome,” wrote one reviewer. “AISES is a great example of a nonprofit making a real difference in their community,” said Perla Ni, CEO of GreatNonprofits, “Their award is well-deserved recognition not only of their work, but the tremendous support they receive, as shown by the many outstanding reviews they have received from people who have direct experience working with AISES.” GreatNonprofits is the largest donation website for nonprofits and where people share stories about their personal experiences on more than 1.6 million charities and nonprofits. The GreatNonprofits Top-Rated Awards are the only awards for nonprofits determined by those who have direct experience with the charities – as donors, volunteers, and recipients of aid. The complete list of 2021 Top Rated Nonprofits can be found at: https://greatnonprofits.org/awards/browse/Campaign:Year2021/Issue:All/Page:1

 


Hispanic-Serving Institutions Across the Nation Total 569

Data from 2019-20 academic year shows 30 new institutions became HSIs SAN ANTONIO – The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities has released an analysis of the 2019-20 Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) enrollment data, which shows an increase in the number of Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) and continued growth in Hispanic student enrollment at colleges and universities. HSIs are institutions with 25 percent or more of Hispanic student enrollment. In 2019-20, HSIs made up 17% of all institutions of higher education and enrolled 67% of all Hispanic undergraduates. As a cohort, HSIs are very diverse and also enroll 41.3% of Asian American, 35.6% of Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander, 24.4% of Black, and 15.8% of non-Hispanic white students. HACU’s analysis of the 2019-20 IPEDS data used the Higher Education Act (HEA) federal definition of HSIs: nonprofit degree-granting institutions with full-time equivalent (FTE) undergraduate Hispanic student enrollment of at least 25%. Findings include:

  • 235 HSIs are two-year public institutions. 150 HSIs are four-year public institutions.
  • 169 HSIs are four-year private institutions. 15 HSIs are two-year private institutions.
  • HSIs represent a total of 569 HSIs in 28 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, up from the 539 institutions in 2018-19.
  • The number of Emerging HSIs, or colleges approaching the 25% Hispanic student enrollment threshold, showed an increase of ten more institutions from the previous year, which was 352 compared to 362 in the latest data.

Some important facts about HSIs to note:

  • HSIs enroll two-thirds of all Hispanic undergraduates.
  • The ten states with the most HSIs collectively enroll 308,755 Hispanic students and over 1.5 million students overall.
  • When you put together the student population at all HSIs, 46% of students are Hispanic.
  • Since 2013, HSIs have increased on average by 29 institutions per year.
  • California and Texas account for nearly 50 percent of all HSIs.
  • 23 out of the 24 states that have a Hispanic undergraduate enrollment of 10 percent or more, have either an HSI or Emerging HSI.
  • A majority of HSIs are in urban areas and are concentrated geographically, with 80% of these institutions located in six states and one territory: California, Florida, Illinois, New Mexico, New York, Texas and Puerto Rico.
  • HSIs and Emerging HSIs are present in all but 12 states, including some less known for their Hispanic population, such as Idaho, Kansas, and Georgia.

View the list* of HSIs and Emerging HSIs here. Download an HSI Fact Sheet and HSI Map here. Celebrate Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, September 13-19, 2021 *This list released in coordination with Excelencia in Education. About HACU The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities was established in 1986 with a founding membership of eighteen institutions. In 1992, HACU led the effort to convince Congress to formally recognize campuses with high Hispanic enrollment as federally designated HSIs and to begin targeting federal appropriations to those campuses. Today, HACU represents more than 500 colleges and universities committed to Hispanic higher education success in the U.S., Puerto Rico, Latin America, Spain, and also school districts throughout the U.S. HACU is the only national educational association that represents Hispanic-Serving Institutions. HACU’s headquarters are located in San Antonio, Texas, with regional offices in Washington, D.C., and Sacramento, California.

ECMC Foundation Grants $1.125 Million to American Indian College Fund to Boost Workforce in North Dakota and Montana

Denver, Colo., March 31, 2021 — The American Indian College Fund is announcing ECMC Foundation’s grant of $1.125 million to fund two programs at tribal colleges and universities in North Dakota and Montana. This grant will help fuel Native American student success in careers in healthcare and education. The North Dakota program “Strengthening Postsecondary Career Pathways Across North Dakota’s Tribal Colleges: Braiding Workforce Development and Native Student Success” provides $500,000 for a two-year program to develop a cohesive system to deliver health care education, stackable credentials, and coordinated career support. The program will align academic programming to support Native student credentialing and prepare students. Program graduates will help North Dakota meet its needs for state and tribal healthcare workers and improve healthcare career and citizen health outcomes. The program will also help increase the capacity of North Dakota TCUs. All five North Dakota TCUs will participate in the program, which include Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Fort Totten; Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College, New Town; Sitting Bull College, Fort Yates; Turtle Mountain Community College, Belcourt; and United Tribes Technical College, Bismarck. The Montana TCU program “Building Montana Tribal College Transfer Pathways for Student Success” provides $625,000 to strengthen transfer pathways between participating Montana TCUs over two-and-a-half-years. The program will support Native student completion and employment in the healthcare and education fields. It will also increase student transfer rates between Montana TCUs by building progressive education pathways from certificate to associate to baccalaureate degrees using transfer policies, procedures, and student support programs. The goal is to increase the TCUs’ capacity to support Native student success, on-time student transfer, and degree completion. Participating Montana TCUs include Aaniiih Nakoda College, Harlem; Blackfeet Community College, Browning; Chief Dull Knife College, Lame Deer; Fort Peck Community College, Poplar; Little Big Horn College, Crow Agency; Salish Kootenai College, Pablo; and Stone Child College, Box Elder. “Since our founding, ECMC Foundation has focused on improving the educational and workforce outcomes for underserved students,” said ECMC Foundation President Peter J. Taylor. “We’re thrilled to support The College Fund’s critical work at the intersection of these issues, ensuring that more Native students are well-placed for the in-demand careers that will be central to our economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.” Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “This is an exciting and challenging time as TCUs develop more employment opportunities for Native and rural students through innovative and collaborative approaches to high-demand careers. We are pleased that ECMC Foundation recognized that TCUs serve as solid, community-based assets, building tribal and regional economies through meaningful employment.” About ECMC Foundation—Based in Los Angeles, ECMC Foundation is a national foundation working to facilitate improvements that affect post-secondary educational outcomes — especially among underserved populations — through evidence-based innovation. It is one of several affiliates under the ECMC Group enterprise based in Minneapolis, which together work to help students succeed. The Foundation invests in College Success and Career Readiness (CTE); and uses a spectrum of funding structures, including strategic grantmaking and program-related investments, to fund both nonprofit and for-profit ventures. Visit ecmcfoundation.org to learn more. About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


LGBTQ+-OWNED AEQUALITAS MEDIA LAUNCHES NEW BRAND OUTvoices

● Aequalitas Media rebrands legacy LGBTQ+ publications as OUTvoices ● The multiplatform entity includes print, digital, TV, radio, and more ● All assets owned by Aequalitas Media, which is NGLCC Certified Chicago, Illinois​ — ​​Following the 2020 acquisitions of legacy LGBTQ+ titles ​Echo Magazine Phoenix​ (​ 31 years); ​Out & About Nashville Magazine​ (16 years); and ​CAMP Kansas City Magazine​ (17 years), ​Aequalitas Media​ has launched ​OUTvoices​, a new national LGBTQ+ brand. The ​OUTvoices ​brand will deliver diverse, fresh, and original LGBTQ+ print, digital, audio and video content. The publications will be rebranded under the OUTvoices umbrella.​ ​Effective April 2nd 2021, all titles currently owned and published by Aequalitas Media with the exception of Gaycation Magazine​, will be renamed to reflect their inclusion in the OUTvoices network. Echo magazine will become OUTvoices Phoenix, ​OUT & ABOUT Nashville​ will become OUTvoices Nashville, and ​CAMP​ will become OUTvoices Kansas City. “I couldn’t be more thrilled with the introduction of OUTvoices and the conversion of the titles we own underneath this new, truly inclusive brand — a one-stop opportunity for brands to easily and effectively advertise to this lucrative market,” ​said DJ Doran, CEO of Aequalitas Media. LGBTQ+ veteran journalist and former Editor in Chief of ​Curve​ Magazine, Merryn Johns will join our editorial team to steer content under the new OUTvoices brand beginning April 2nd 2021. The ​OUTvoices ​brand will deliver diverse, fresh, and original LGBTQ+ print, digital, audio and video content. The publications will be rebranded under the OUTvoices umbrella.​ ​Effective April 2nd 2021, all titles currently owned and published by Aequalitas Media with the exception of Gaycation Magazine​, will be renamed to reflect their inclusion in the OUTvoices network. ​Echo magazine will become OUTvoices Phoenix, ​OUT & ABOUT Nashville​ will become OUTvoices Nashville, and ​CAMP​ will become OUTvoices Kansas City. “I couldn’t be more thrilled with the introduction of OUTvoices and the conversion of the titles we own underneath this new, truly inclusive brand — a one-stop opportunity for brands to easily and effectively advertise to this lucrative market,” ​said DJ Doran, CEO of Aequalitas Media. LGBTQ+ veteran journalist and former Editor in Chief of ​Curve​ Magazine, Merryn Johns will join our editorial team to steer content under the new OUTvoices brand beginning April 2nd 2021. “​I am thrilled to bring my passion for serving LGBTQ+ readers to OUTvoices and to bring them the best quality content possible, nationwide​,” ​said Johns​. Additionally,​ OUTvoices Chicago​ will go live in Q2 of 2021. The new LGBTQ+ news and lifestyle website will feature originally produced articles and stories from the LGBTQ+ community in Chicago as well as curated content from other members of the OUTvoices network. Visitors to the new ​OUTvoices.us​ ​website and many other LGBTQ+ websites will be able to listen to ​OUTvoices Radio​, 24/7 LGBTQ+ talk radio. OUTvoices Radio​, scheduled to launch later in March 2021, will be the first internet-based streaming LGBTQ+ talk radio station offering listeners pre-recorded and live programming 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The lineup includes shows from LGBTQ+ thought leaders, entertainers, entrepreneurs, musicians, and more. The OUTvoices Radio widget will be offered to ALL LGBTQ+ websites at no cost. “​It is part of our company philosophy of supporting other LGBTQ+ medias by sharing content for FREE,” said Doran. It will be followed by ​OUTvoices TV ​in late Q2 of 2021 and will feature originally produced series such as The Gaycation Travel Show with host Ravi Roth. Season 1 will begin airing new episodes airing every Friday beginning May 14th. OUTvoicesTV is currently filming The Gay Gourmet, a cooking show with Oprah Winfrey’s former personal Chef Art Smith and Joe Eats World Chef Joe Morales as hosts. OUTvoices TV​ will offer viewers access via our YouTube channel to high quality shows that reflect the depth and breadth of talent within the LGBTQ+ community in News, Opinion, Fashion, Travel, Food, and more. The nationally focused website ​OUTvoices.us​ domain has been chosen as a reflection of ​us​, the LGBTQ+ community. As a website, it will encourage small-to-medium LGBTQ+ sites to unite under the OUTvoices domain. This will allow smaller sites that may have been overlooked by major brands and agencies to combine their audiences and analytics to be more attractive to advertisers. The OUTvoices network will also allow other members to share and benefit from resources, content, and exposure in beneficial ways. Other Aequalitas acquisitions and initiatives for 2021 include:

  • ● LGBTQ+ Media Acquisitions, Aequalitas Media​ currently has three LGBTQ+ media assets in the pipeline which are scheduled to close sometime in 2021.
  • The Gay Travel Business Network, a new business-to-business travel organization led by LGBTQ+ travel expert and Executive Director Ed Salvato and a board of travel luminaries helping tourism, hospitality and travel-related businesses and brands better connect with other like-minded businesses desiring to do business with each other.
  • Aequalitas Content Creators Association​,​ a​ 501c6 organization for LGBTQ+ content creators to gather at an annual conference in late August in Cedar Rapids IA to network with each other and listen to industry experts and exchange ideas and best practices toward increasing reach and revenue as the industry continues to evolve.
  • NGLCC(National LGBT Chamber of Commerce) Certification, ​Aequalitas Media ​and all of the assets under its umbrella have been certified as LGBT business enterprises by the NGLCC.

“The expanding portfolio of LGBTQ+ media assets and these new ventures strengthen Aequalitas Mediaand create additional value for our advertisers, clients and partners as well as contribute to the revitalization of LGBTQ+ media in 2021 and beyond​,” ​said Doran​. ABOUT AEQUALITAS MEDIA Aequalitas Media​​ [​pronounced e-QUAL-i-tas​] is one of the fastest growing LGBTQ+ media companies in the U.S., from spanning print, digital publishing and media buying to managing a 24/7 LGBTQ+ talk radio station and a national network of LGBTQ+ websites. ​Aequalitas Media​ is well positioned for growth in 2021 and beyond. Our company’s Advisory Board is made up of some of the best and brightest in LGBTQ+ media and business giving us a distinctive edge over our competitors when it comes to delivering results and evolving opportunities to expand our reach.


Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute

Apply today for our Energy and Child Welfare Graduate Fellowships! Application Deadline: Friday, February 19, 2021 at 11:59 pm ET CHCI is looking for emerging leaders from across the country interested in working alongside policy makers and industry experts dedicated to creating positive change. We have extended our deadline for Graduate Fellows interested in working in Energy and Child Welfare. CHCI’s Graduate Fellowship Program offers a unique, paid, nine-month opportunity to receive hands-on leadership training, access to a diverse industry network and invaluable work experience on Capitol Hill and beyond that helps its Fellows to stand out in today’s job market. Know someone who might be a good fit for the program? Please share this information! APPLY TODAY! API Graduate Fellowship CHCI is seeking Graduate Fellows interested in energy. After a first-half placement in a Congressional office, API Graduate Fellows work in the D.C. office of the American Petroleum Institute (API) for the second half of the program. At API, the Fellow will gain exposure to API’s work across research, advocacy and safety promotion. The Fellowship would be tailored to the Fellow’s background and interests, with work potentially in safety standards, digital and traditional media communications strategy, community engagement, policy research, and/or government relations. “The work I do as an API Fellow has helped me better understand the role legislation plays in the energy and environmental insecurities our communities face and the work needed to be done for a just and equitable clean energy transition. This fellowship has brought me one step closer to connecting my undergraduate work as a chemical engineer with the energy and environmental legislation that will best help our communities as we reach and attain our global climate goals.” – David Valdes, 2020-2021 API Fellow Child Welfare Graduate Fellowship CHCI is seeking Graduate Fellows interested in child welfare (including foster care, adoption, kinship care) and serving families at-risk of entering foster care. Applicants should have a degree, work and/or volunteer experience related to serving vulnerable children and families and demonstrated leadership in addressing such issues faced by the Latino community. No specific degrees are required, but dedication and passion for helping families within their communities is greatly encouraged. “As a child welfare graduate fellow, I have the unique opportunity to work on federal policy that directly impacts children. Whether it be writing letters, introducing new bills, re-introducing bills, meeting with constituents/stakeholders, and offering my perspective on legislative actions–there is a wealth of opportunity to create a landscape that prioritizes racial, economic, and immigrant justice for children in the welfare space.” – Marina Sangit, 2020-2021 Child Welfare Graduate Fellow Want to learn more about the CHCI Graduate Fellowships? Click here for to view a video overview of the program, or to learn more about the benefits of the Fellowship for STEM majors. Interested in our Internship or High School Program? Learn more about CHCI’s Congressional Internship Program and R2L NextGen programs!


The ODP Corporation Launches Nonprofit Initiative to Help Accelerate the Creation, Growth and Prosperity of Minority-Owned Small Businesses

Elevate Together™ powered by Round It Up America® will connect Black and Hispanic small business owners with education, access and aid in collaboration with the National Urban League’s Entrepreneurship Centers and the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. The ODP Corporation (NASDAQ:ODP), a leading provider of business services, products and digital workplace technology solutions through an integrated B2B distribution platform, today announced the launch of Elevate Together™ powered by Round It Up America®, a new nonprofit initiative designed to help accelerate the creation, growth and prosperity of Black and Hispanic-owned small businesses. In collaboration with the National Urban League’s Entrepreneurship Centers and the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC), Elevate Together™ will help to deliver impactful, measurable and scalable support services that foster business creation and growth opportunities for Black and Hispanic small businesses with five or less employees. As part of this initiative, eligible small business owners will gain access to educational workshops, training and mentorship services, professional networks and more. Businesses may also be eligible to receive aid in the form of cash grants, products and services. “We strongly believe that in a society where the playing field is level, Black and Hispanic small businesses will play a vital role in restoring the health of our economy and in driving long-term wealth creation across North America,” said Gerry Smith, chief executive officer for The ODP Corporation. “With support from our associates, customers, community partners and other like-minded corporations, we hope to continue to foster new opportunities for minority-owned small businesses, to help them prosper and get the resources they need to better compete in today’s marketplace.” In keeping with its longstanding history of serving local community businesses and as the founding partner of Elevate Together™, The ODP Corporation is proud to pledge an initial investment of $250,000, which will help to launch the initiative in Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and South Florida.“Small businesses are key to job creation, and through the work of the National Urban League’s Entrepreneurship Centers Program, current and prospective entrepreneurs in underserved communities across the country are being empowered to establish new ventures every day,” said Marc H. Morial, president and chief executive officer for the National Urban League. “This partnership with Elevate Together™ powered by Round It Up America® will help us provide additional services that will impact and improve the lives of many Black business owners for years to come.” According to a recent survey from the National Association for Business Economics, 73% of surveyed forecasters believe that the economy will not return to its pre-pandemic level until the second half of 2021. To help strengthen local communities and foster job creation during this challenging time, it is now more important than ever to provide minority-owned small businesses with access to essential business resources and direct financial investments. “At the USHCC, we are proud to advocate for Hispanic-owned businesses to foster economic development and build sustainable prosperity for our American economy,” said Ramiro A. Cavazos, president and chief executive officer for the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. “We’re excited to help launch this new initiative, championed by The ODP Corporation, and look forward to expanding our services and reach to support America’s diverse small business owners through our network of chambers during this time of economic recovery.” Individuals interested in helping to elevate minority-owned businesses through this initiative can make a donation to Elevate Together™ at their nearest Office Depot or OfficeMax store and at checkout on officedepot.com. For more information about Elevate Together™ powered by Round It Up America®, including how to participate as a minority-owned small business or get involved as a corporate donor, visit ElevateTogether.org About The ODP Corporation The ODP Corporation (NASDAQ:ODP) is a leading provider of business services and supplies, products and digital workplace technology solutions to small, medium and enterprise businesses, through an integrated business-to-business (B2B) distribution platform, which includes world-class supply chain and distribution operations, dedicated sales professionals and technicians, online presence, and approximately 1,200 stores. Through its banner brands Office Depot®, OfficeMax®, CompuCom® and Grand&Toy®, as well as others, the company offers its customers the tools and resources they need to focus on their passion of starting, growing and running their business. For more information, visit news.theodpcorp.com and investor.theodpcorp.com. The ODP Corporation and Office Depot are trademarks of The Office Club, Inc. OfficeMax is a trademark of OMX, Inc. CompuCom is a trademark of CompuCom Systems, Inc. Grand&Toy is a trademark of Grand & Toy, LLC in Canada. ©2021 Office Depot, LLC. All rights reserved. Any other product or company names mentioned herein are the trademarks of their respective owners.


Millions of American Indian College Fund Scholarship Dollars Available for California’s Native American Students

Applications Open February 1, 2021 for The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship, Sponsored by the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians Native American college students from qualified California tribes have millions of dollars of scholarship funds available to them through the American Indian College Fund’s Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship, sponsored by the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. Funds are available to most California tribal members seeking higher education, including technical and vocational certifications and associate, bachelor’s, and graduate degrees. Students earning a technical or vocational certification can get up to $5,000 per year. Students attending a state or private community college or university can get up to $20,000 per year. Enrolled members of California tribes which receive little or no gaming or agricultural revenue from the state are eligible. Interested students can learn more and apply online beginning February 1, 2021 at collegefund.org/california. The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship program was created as part of The Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians’ longstanding traditions and values in support of the education and development of youth – and funded by the 2016 Tribal State Gaming Compact with the State of California. Christopher Villaruel, Chandra Norton, and Kenwa Kravitz are three recipients who are realizing their education and career goals thanks to The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship. Christopher Villaruel, a member of the Pit River Tribe and a senior forest hydrology major at Humboldt State University, plans to combine his education and training with traditional knowledge to create better managed forests that are less susceptible to devastating fires and to maintain watershed health, providing cleaner water for all Californians. Chandra Norton, a member of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is working on her bachelor’s degree in community advocates and responsive education in human services. She plans to seek a master’s degree in public health administration to assist her in her career with her community’s local health clinic. Kenwa Kravitz, a member of the Pit River Tribe, is studying Native studies leadership. She advocates in her community as a member of the Redding Cultural District Board. Her efforts have led to the land acknowledgement of the Wintu people, a formal apology, and creation of culturally informed education curricula. Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “Expanding support of American Indian and Alaska Native students is a shared goal of the American Indian College Fund and The Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship will provide eligible students with amazing support for their journey of college success.” In addition to The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship, the College Fund offers many additional scholarship opportunities to American Indian and Alaskan Native students from across the nation seeking a higher education. To learn more visit https://www.collegefund.org. About the American Indian College Fund: The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI) announced the new members of its Alumni Association National Board, and regional chapter officers.

The CHCI Alumni Association (CHCI-AA) is a network of more than 4,400 Latino professionals across the country. The national board includes Jose Plaza, President; Jazmin Garcia, Vice President; Stephanie Medina, Civic Engagement Chair; Daniel Lind, Communications Chair; and Eric Hernandez, Professionalda Development Chair. The CHCI-AA mission is to promote active and visible leadership in the community, while providing members with increased opportunities for professional development, networking and, most importantly, opportunities to mentor young Latino/a/x professionals who participated in CHCI’s leadership programs. “The CHCI Alumni Association is central to advancing our mission, and I am excited to welcome the new national board and regional officers,” said Marco Davis, CHCI President and CEO. “CHCI alums are our strongest asset, and a testament to how important our work is to empower Latino/a/x professionals early on with meaningful leadership opportunities and experiences that help them excel in all sectors and industries. Moreover, CHCI alums continue to pay it forward by giving their time, talent, and expertise to uplift the next generation of Latino leaders.” “I am honored and humbled to be elected as the next president of the CHCI Alumni Association and the opportunity to represent the more than 4,400 alumni across the country as a member of the CHCI Board of Directors. CHCI for decades has been charting the course for thousands of Latinxs as they navigate careers in a myriad of fields and exposing them to life-changing opportunities. I am thrilled to be joined by an amazing cohort of leaders on the board and together we are committed to building on the legacy of past CHCI-AA leadership and developing long-lasting partnerships and change for all alumni,” said Jose Plaza, CHCI Alumni Association National President (CHCI Graduate Fellow 2012-2013). The leadership of the CHCI-AA Regional Chapters include: Chicago Maria Velazquez, President Edgar Gonzalez, Jr., Vice President Claudia Valencia, Secretary Ana Artiaga, Treasurer Dallas Jesus Ginez, President Ramon Hernandez, Vice President DC Metro Antonio Hernandez, President Aliza Auces, Vice President New York City Pamela Cardoso, President Phoenix Flavio Bravo, President South Florida Robert Locke, President Ana Moas, Vice President Oscar Serra, Secretary Abel Ramos Taype, Treasurer Carla Santamaria, Programs Coordinator Southern California Brian Lucero Contreras, President Wendy Ramirez, Vice President Jacqueline Perez-Valencia, Secretary Gisela Ariza, Treasurer Jorge Gonzalez Canizal, Programs Coordinator The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI) is the premier Hispanic nonprofit and nonpartisan 501(c)(3) organization in the country dedicated to developing the next generation of Latino leaders®. CHCI provides leadership, public service, and policy experiences to outstanding Latino/a/x students and young professionals, and convenes Members of Congress, other public officials, corporate executives, nonprofit advocates, and thought leaders to discuss issues facing the nation and the Hispanic community. Visit CHCI.org and follow us @CHCI on social media.   Contact: Maria Ibañez / mibanez@chci.org


AT&T Gives $1.5 Million in Pandemic-Related Supplies to More Than 20 Tribal Colleges and Universities

Tribal Colleges and Universities on Indian Reservations Receive Supplies The American Indian College Fund and the American Indian Higher Education Consortium are receiving $1.5M in pandemic-related supplies including hand sanitizer, disinfectant and gloves. Both organizations are working with AT&T to distribute the supplies to more than 20 tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) across the country. This comes as Native communities face soaring COVID-19 infection rates, rolling lockdowns are enacted on Indian reservations, and tribal community members are having difficulties accessing supplies. Native American communities suffer COVID-19 infection rates greater than 3.5 times that of the white population, according to the Centers for Disease Control. The American Indian College Fund is the largest provider of scholarships to Native American students in the nation, and the American Indian Higher Education Consortium is the national advocacy organization supporting tribal college and universities. The two organizations worked with AT&T to ship the supplies to the following TCUs, including:

  • The American Indian Higher Education Consortium, Washington, D.C.
  • Blackfeet Community College, Montana
  • College of Menominee Nation, Wisconsin
  • College of the Muscogee Nation, Oklahoma
  • Diné College, Arizona
  • Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, Minnesota
  • Fort Peck Community College, Montana
  • Iḷisaġvik College, Alaska
  • Institute of American Indian Arts, New Mexico
  • Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe College, Wisconsin
  • Little Big Horn College, Montana
  • Little Priest Tribal College, Nebraska
  • Navajo Technical University, New Mexico
  • Northwest Indian College, Washington
  • Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College, North Dakota
  • Oglala Lakota College, South Dakota
  • Red Lake Nation College, Minnesota
  • Salish Kootenai College, Montana
  • Sinte Gleska University, South Dakota
  • Stone Child College, Montana
  • Tohono O’odham Community College, Arizona
  • Turtle Mountain Tribal College, North Dakota
  • White Earth Tribal and Community College, Montana
Albert Gourneau (left) and Anthony Desjarlais (right) from Turtle Mountain Community College’s facilities department prepare to distribute sanitizing supplies and safety equipment at the tribal college campus in Belcourt, North Dakota

“We are glad to play our part to help provide the critical resources Native communities need to survive the COVID-19 pandemic, which has disproportionately affected Native Americans this year,” said Tom Brooks, Vice President of External and Legislative Affairs at AT&T. “There is much more work to be done to ensure Native American communities have access to the resources needed to get through the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. We look forward to continuing this vital work with the American Indian College Fund and American Indian Higher Education Consortium to address this.” Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “On behalf of our tribal colleges and universities and our sister organization, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, I want to share our deep appreciation of AT&T’s gift of pandemic-related supplies for our communities. Our rural, economically distressed communities need support to protect the health and well-being of students and their families. The commitment of AT&T to helping address health and other disparities in the U.S. is demonstrated through their generous support.” AT&T has been a long supporter of the American Indian College Fund to turn reservations into places of opportunity. The long relationship with the American Indian College Fund has helped Native American students with income and geographical barriers earn a college degree through funded support at the 35 Tribal Colleges and Universities around the country.

Peter Romero, Director of Facilities and Security at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, readies the college’s newly delivered supply.

About AT&T— AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T) is a diversified, global leader in telecommunications, media and entertainment, and technology. AT&T Communications provides more than 100 million U.S. consumers with entertainment and communications experiences across TV, mobile and broadband. Plus, it serves high-speed, highly secure connectivity and smart solutions to nearly 3 million business customers. WarnerMedia is a leading media and entertainment company that creates and distributes premium and popular content to global audiences through its consumer brands, including: HBO, HBO Max, Warner Bros., TNT, TBS, truTV, CNN, DC Entertainment, New Line, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim and Turner Classic Movies. Xandr, now part of WarnerMedia, provides marketers with innovative and relevant advertising solutions for consumers around premium video content and digital advertising through its platform. AT&T Latin America provides pay-TV services across 10 countries and territories in Latin America and the Caribbean and wireless services to consumers and businesses in Mexico. AT&T products and services are provided or offered by subsidiaries and affiliates of AT&T Inc. under the AT&T brand and not by AT&T Inc. Additional information is available at about.att.com. © 2021 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, the Globe logo and other marks are trademarks and service marks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other marks contained herein are the property of their respective owners. About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


CHCI NAMES NEW MEMBERS TO BOARD OF DIRECTORS FOR 2021-2022

CHCI Chair-Rep. Barragan Representative Nanette Diaz Barragán (CA-44) is CHCI’s New Chair. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI) announced the addition of new members of its Board of Directors, as well as the full slate of officers for 2021-2022. Representative Nanette Diaz Barragán (CA-44) will serve as CHCI’s new Chair. Rep. Barragán also serves as the First Vice Chair for the Congressional Hispanic Caucus (CHC) in the 117th Congress. The CHCI Board officers include: Vice Chair Ronald Estrada, Senior Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility & Community Empowerment, Univision Communications, Inc.; Treasurer Maria Luisa Boyce, Vice President for International Policy, UPS; and Secretary Peter R. Villegas, Co-Chairman, Mercury. In addition, CHCI named Ignacio A. Sandoval, a Partner at Morgan Lewis as General Counsel. “I am honored to serve as CHCI’s Chair and work alongside the organization’s dedicated staff, alumni, and program participants, as well as our Board and Advisory Council members,” said Rep. Barragán. “I look forward to advancing and supporting CHCI’s mission to develop the next generation of Latino leaders, and to ensure that our voices are represented in all sectors of the workforce.” The new members joining the Board of Directors include: Sen. Ben Ray Lujan (NM) Rep. Tony Cardenas (CA-29) Rep. Darren Soto (FL- 09) Rep. Norma Torres (CA-35) Silvia Aldana, Manager of Federal Affairs – PG&E Corporation Raul Anaya, President of Business Banking – Bank of America Angela Arboleda, Senior Director, Federal Government Affairs – Altria David Gonzales, Global Chief Diversity Officer – Bristol Myers Squibb Bruce Harris, Vice President of Federal Government Affairs – Walmart Antonio Moya, Manager of the Latino Relations Department – Salt River Project (SRP) Leo Muñoz, Executive Director of Federal Governmental Affairs – Comcast Corporation Ademola Oyefeso, International Vice President and Director of the Legislative and Political Action Department – United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW) Jose L. Plaza, CHCI Alumni Association National President Ignacio A. Sandoval, Partner – Morgan Lewis Zuraya Tapia Hadley, Manager of Public Policy – Facebook Other CHCI Board members who will continue to serve in 2021-22 include: Rep. Jimmy Gomez (CA-34) Evelyn DeJesus, Vice President for Education – American Federation of Teachers (AFT) Rich Garcia, Vice President, Operations – State Farm Jesse Price, Public Policy – TikTok “We are excited to welcome the new 2021-2022 CHCI Board Members and Officers. With backgrounds that range from corporate executives, to entrepreneurs, to civic leaders, CHCI counts on the expertise of a remarkable slate of leaders at the top of their professions. Our board will continue to strengthen our programs and continue to position CHCI as a center for thought leadership,” said Marco Davis, CHCI President and CEO. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI) is the premier Hispanic nonprofit and nonpartisan 501(c)(3) organization in the country dedicated to developing the next generation of Latino leaders®. CHCI provides leadership, public service, and policy experiences to outstanding Latino/a/x students and young professionals, and convenes Members of Congress, other public officials, corporate executives, nonprofit advocates, and thought leaders to discuss issues facing the nation and the Hispanic community. Visit CHCI.org and follow us @CHCI on social media. Contact: Maria Ibañez / mibanez@chci.org


Early Childhood Education Linked to Long-Term Education Attainment

American Indian College Fund to Strengthen Early Childhood Teacher Pipeline with Support from The W.K. Kellogg Foundation

Denver, Colo.—January 14, 2021— Early childhood education can help close the college education attainment gap among American Indians and Alaska Natives—which is currently less than half of other groups at 14.8%—by improving students’ academic achievement, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Thanks to a two-year, $600,000 grant from The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the American Indian College Fund will help tribal college communities strengthen and expand the pipeline for Native teachers through its Indigenous Early Childhood Education Systemic Engagement and ECE Learning in Native American Communities program. Native teachers serve as critical role models engendering the success of young Native American students, while understanding the unique needs of their students. In addition to improving young children’s long-term educational attainment, early childhood education can also reduce the need for special education and increase employment and earnings, according to the U.S. Department of Education. The American Indian College Fund’s two-year systemic engagement program will provide program mentorship between tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) and their students and will help increase TCUs’ capacity to address and eliminate barriers for Native American college students seeking a degree in early childhood education. The systemic engagement program will support dissemination of new knowledge and methods of culturally centered early childhood education in tribal college communities. The program began November 1, 2020. Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “Native people know that our children come to us from a sacred place and that their socialization is critical to their own well-being and to the well-being of tribal nations. We appreciate our partnership with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation because it results in our TCUs adapting our teachings and practices into modern infrastructure, demonstrating resiliency and commitment to kinship and identity.” About The W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF)—The W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF), founded in 1930 as an independent, private foundation by breakfast cereal innovator and entrepreneur Will Keith Kellogg, is among the largest philanthropic foundations in the United States. Guided by the belief that all children should have an equal opportunity to thrive, WKKF works with communities to create conditions for vulnerable children so they can realize their full potential in school, work and life. The Kellogg Foundation is based in Battle Creek, Michigan, and works throughout the United States and internationally, as well as with sovereign tribes. Special attention is paid to priority places where there are high concentrations of poverty and where children face significant barriers to success. WKKF priority places in the U.S. are in Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico and New Orleans; and internationally, are in Mexico and Haiti. For more information, visit www.wkkf.org About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute R2LNextGen Program – Apply by February 15, 2021

CHCI’s R2L NextGen Program will be hosting a weeklong summer leadership program for current high school sophomores and juniors. During the program, students will meet with Members of Congress, visit historic sites in Washington, D.C., and participate in leadership development training that will give them the tools they need as a part of the next generation of Latino leaders. This program is completely free to all participants, including travel*, housing*, etc. R2L NextGen will be held in three different sessions in 2021. APPLICATION DEADLINE IS FEBRUARY 15, 2021. For more information visit https://chci.org/programs/r2l-nextgen/


ERG Resource Group

Global ERG Network Visit info@globalergnet.com for more information.


American Indian College Fund to Award 10 Tribal Colleges and Universities with Grants for Native Arts Enrichment and Expansion of Existing Programs and Curriculum Development

Native communities have historically used traditional arts to transfer knowledge about culture, language, mathematics, science, and the land to their communities and upcoming generations. The American Indian College Fund is awarding $900,000 in grants to nine tribal colleges and universities for the two-and-a-half-year program to establish new Native arts programs and to expand existing Native arts programs at tribal colleges and universities (TCUs). In addition to transferring traditional arts knowledge to the next generation in Native communities, the grants will also ensure that Native arts are more deeply understood, more widely practiced, and more broadly recognized. A total of 29 TCUs in the following 10 states are eligible to apply: Alaska, Arizona, Southern California, Montana, Minnesota, New Mexico North Dakota, South Dakota, Washington, and Wisconsin. According to Bridget Skenadore, Program Officer of Native Arts and Culture at the College Fund, the goals of the program are to establish Native arts programs at the tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) to pass on cultural knowledge and artistic skills, ensuring Native communities are fluent in Native arts practice; to create leaders in tribal communities that champion the arts and foster equitable, accessible, safe practice within their communities; to connect Native communities to each other to create cultural corridors; to establish community-based anchor organizations or infrastructure to foster a thriving artistic environment conducive to creative practice; and to ensure community-based artistic and cultural continuity. This program will continue the work the College Fund began in the Native arts space in 2013 with its three-year Restoration and Preservation of Traditional Native Arts and Knowledge, which was available to 13 TCUs located in the upper-Midwest states and was so successful that it was renewed for an additional three years. The grant laid the groundwork for building out successful Native arts programs by enhancing the capacity of TCUs through the development of new core academic classes and more structured community-based traditional Native arts programs, such as bow-making, quill work, and moccasin-making. The program also built capacity at TCUs for intergenerational transfer of Native artistic and cultural practices to tribal community members and students through funding for master artist, apprentice, and artist-in-residency programs. Finally, the College Fund awarded seven TCUs with $3,000 Distance Learning grants to support transition from in-person classes and community events to an online format during the pandemic. Funding trainings, consulting services, publications, social media, printers, website subscription upgrades and/or other related items that support this area. Funding cannot be used for the purchase of technology such as laptops, tablets, or chrome books. Grants were awarded to Blackfeet Community College, College of Menominee Nation, Diné College, Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe College, Northwest Indian College, and Salish Kootenai College. Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “The missions of the TCUs are rooted in indigenous ways of knowing and our support of arts programming helps TCUs fulfill that mission. We believe access to indigenous art is one of our inherent rights, as that access helps build community wellbeing and strengthens tribal identities. We are excited to partner with our TCUs and foster their innovative approaches to the intergenerational transfer of art knowledge and skills.” About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement Launches Multicultural Leadership Program

(Chicago, IL) – In collaboration with corporate partners Edelman and Barilla, the Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement (HACE) launched a Multicultural Leadership Program (MCLP) pilot. The 5-month program is designed for professionals of color to build self-awareness on the cultural values and unique challenges faced in the workplace, to master leading diverse teams, and to build a strong support network across communities, all the while transforming high-potential professionals to high-performing leaders. Jean-Pierre Comte, President of Barilla Americas states, “At Barilla, our diversity and inclusion journey starts with the recognition that supporting diversity and inclusion is not only the right thing to do, but is also good for our business. Especially during a global pandemic, a diverse workforce allows for a deeper understanding of society and leads to stronger decision making. By taking a strategic approach to invest in our diverse leaders, we are living out our commitment to become a more inclusive and equitable workplace.” Dani Jackson, Chicago Diversity & Inclusion Lead at Edelman added, “At Edelman, we believe diversity, equity and inclusion is imperative to transform our company and our society, empowering our workforce to bring who they are to the table to do the best work for our clients. In addition to recruiting racially and ethnically diverse talent, we continue to intentionally create space for talent to thrive at the highest levels of leadership. We are proud to partner with HACE to provide leadership development opportunities at Edelman.” Multiculturalism is not a new concept to HACE. The diversity represented in the Latinx community aides in promoting allyship and unity across all communities. Latinos are part of the Black, Asian, and many other communities that experience many similar and unique challenges in the workplace. In 2019, HACE’s annual theme centered around Intersectionality and in 2020, HACE’s theme of “Our Collective Power” focuses on building a more equitable and inclusive workforce and society, together. The MCLP was the perfect next step towards achieving this. “In a time where there is such a longing for unity, equity, and inclusivity more than ever, I could not be prouder to have launched this pilot in partnership with Barilla and Edelman”, states Patricia Mota, President & CEO of HACE. “These two corporations are leading the way in ensuring their employees of color are feeling supported and heard.” The MCLP cohort is a demographically diverse group of professionals made up of 39% African American, 33% Latinx, and 28% Asian with education and experience levels ranging across the gamut. The majority of participants reside in Chicago with approximately one third residing on the East and West coasts including New Jersey, Washington DC, Florida, and Los Angeles, CA. Collectively, Edelman and Barilla, sponsored 18 employees. Edelman is a global communications firm, founded in 1952, a family-run company with 6,000+ employees globally. Barilla is a global Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG) company headquartered in Italy, with 8,400+ employees worldwide and an estimated $4 billion in annual revenues. To learn more about the HACE Multicultural Leadership Program, please visit: www.haceonline.org. For more information on the program, contact Sonia Del Real at sonia@haceonline.org. For media inquiries, contact Julian Gonzalez, Marketing and Communications Manager at julian@haceonline.org. About HACE The Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement (HACE) is a national non-profit dedicated to the employment, development, and advancement of current and aspiring Latino professionals. Since 1982, HACE has served as a resource for Latinos in the workplace and is a subject matter expert for corporations seeking to access diverse talent. Through professional development, resources and networks, and by facilitating access to meaningful career opportunities, HACE helps Latinos succeed in every phase of their careers. With a network of over 77,000 across the country, HACE works with employers to remain competitive in an increasingly dynamic economy by helping them attract, develop and retain Latino and diverse professionals. For more information, visit HACEonline.org


US Organizations Receive Diversity Impact Awards at ERG Leadership Summit

Greensboro, NC (October, 2020)The Association of ERGs & Councils (a practice group of PRISM International, Inc. and Talent Dimensions) recognized the outstanding achievements of Employee Resource Groups, Diversity Councils and other DE&I initiatives at the Diversity Impact Awards™ ceremonies during the USC Marshall Center for Effective Organizations 2020 ERG Leadership Summit Week: A Virtual Event October 19 – October 24. Each evening of the conference included award ceremonies honoring the Top 25 US Employee Resource Groups (ERGs), Top 10 Enterprise-Wide ERGs, Top 10 Diversity Action and Executive Sponsor of the Year Recognition Awards. “The virtual event didn’t dampen the spirit and excitement of the award winners as they celebrated the incredible accomplishments of their teams,” said Lynn Cowart, Principle and Chief Operations Officer at Talent Dimensions. The Diversity Impact Awards™ was launched in 2020 and is the next iteration of the ERG & Council Honors Award™. The ERG & Council Honors Award™ was the first, and until recently, the only annual national award that recognized and honored the outstanding contributions and achievements of ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. It was established in 2008 by the Association of ERGs & Councils, a practice group of diversity and inclusion consulting and training firm, PRISM International, Inc. The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ were reimagined to leverage a data-driven and scientifically-validated model developed by Dr. Theresa M. Welbourne, Will and Maggie Brooke Professor in Entrepreneurship at the University of Alabama and CEO of eePulse, to ensure buy-in from key stakeholders and drive greater learning. The awards were segmented to create a level playing field for individual ERGs, enterprise-wide ERG programs and non-ERG Diversity initiatives. For the second year, we are honoring the important work of Executive Sponsors. “While we were excited to launch the new Diversity Impact Awards after almost a year of research and gaining input, launching a new awards structure during COVID-19 was challenging to say the least. We considered taking a hiatus given what organizations were experiencing. We quickly realized that this work was far too important and the individuals volunteering countless hours to create organizations where ALL people felt engaged, included and that they belong, must be recognized,” said Cile Johnson, Principle and Chief Business Officer at Talent Dimensions. Congratulations to all our Diversity Impact Award winners! The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ Top 25 ERG Award recipients:

  1. Blue Cross NC – GlobalNet
  2. Novant Health – Women’s Business Resource Group
  3. Northwestern Mutual – Asian Employee Resource Group
  4. Rockwell Automation – Cultures Connected
  5. Northwestern Mutual – Women’s Employee Resource Group
  6. ChristianaCare – Women’s Employee Network (WEN)
  7. Mount Sinai Health System – Heritage of Latino Alliance Employee Resource Group
  8. Northwestern Mutual – Hispanic Employee Resource Group
  9. Northwestern Mutual – Mutual disAbility Alliance
  10. NextEra Energy – African American Employee Professional Group
  11. Novant Health – Persons with Abilities Business Resource Group
  12. Novant Health – Black/African American Business Resource Group
  13. Southern California Edison – Latinos for Engagement, Advancement and Development (LEAD)
  14. Erie Insurance – Women’s Affinity Group
  15. Bank of America – LEAD for Women
  16. Northwestern Mutual – Military Veteran Employee Resource Group (MVERG)
  17. NextEra Energy – Women in Energy
  18. Novant Health – Pride Business Resource Group
  19. State Street – Professional Women’s Network Massachusetts Chapter (PWN-MA)
  20. Novant Health – Veterans’ Business Resource Group
  21. JetBlue – JetBlue African Diaspora Experience (JADE)
  22. Dominion Energy – We3
  23. American Airlines – Latin Diversity Network EBRG
  24. Halliburton – Women Sharing Excellence
  25. American Airlines – Professional Women in Aviation EBRG

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ Top 10 Enterprise-Wide ERG Award recipients:

  1. Bank of America – Bank of America Enterprise ERGs
  2. Northern Trust – Northern Trust Business Resource Council Advisory Council (BRCAC)
  3. Asurion – Asurion ERGs
  4. Cigna – Power of Connections Wellness Circles
  5. Southern Company Gas – 2019 ERG Program Expansion/Evolution
  6. Banner Health – Team Member Resource Group (TMRGs) Launch
  7. University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center – Diversity Council and Employee Networks
  8. Perdue Farms, Inc. – “Day of Understanding”
  9. Tennessee Valley Authority – TVA ERG Collaboration
  10. American Airlines – Abraham’s Tent – Christian, Jewish and Muslim EBRGs

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards Top 10 Diversity Action Award recipients:

  1. Mount Sinai Beth Israel – Go Red Event
  2. Portsmouth Naval Shipyard
  3. Froedtert Health – Disability Etiquette
  4. Ricoh – International Women’s Day
  5. Halliburton – Focus on Family
  6. NASCAR – Heritage History Series
  7. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana – Strategic Plan
  8. Novant Health – Health Equity Council
  9. American Airlines – Virtual Inclusion Week
  10. Novant Health – Cross Cultural Communications Program

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards Executive Sponsor of the Year recipients in alphabetical order:

  • Dominion Energy – Wendy Wellener, Vice President – Shared Services
  • NextEra Energy, Inc. – Kate Stengle, Vice President Internal Audit
  • Northern Trust – Shundrawn Thomas, President of Northern Trust Asset Management (NTAM)
  • Novant Health – Chere Gregory, MD, SVP Chief Health Equity Officer Diversity & Inclusion

About the Diversity Impact Awards™ The Diversity Impact Awards™ program was launched in 2020 and is the next iteration of the ERG & Council Honors Award™. The ERG & Council Honors Award™ was the first, and until recently, the only annual national award that recognized and honored the outstanding contributions and achievements of ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. The new award process leverages a data-driven and scientifically validated model to create collective learning within and across organizations. The honor award was established in 2008 by the Association of ERGs & Councils, a practice group of diversity and inclusion consulting and training firm, PRISM International, Inc. About the ERG & Council Conference™ ERGs and Diversity Councils are vital links for improving organizational results. However, to remain impactful and effective, they need opportunities to increase their skills and knowledge and to learn and share best practices. They need opportunities to network, celebrate and grow. This was the purpose of the first annual conference designed specifically for ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. Learn more by visiting http://www.ergcouncilconference.com. About the Association of ERGs & Councils The Association of ERGs & Councils is a practice group of PRISM International, Inc. and Talent Dimensions and the premier resource for transforming Employee Resource Groups, Diversity Councils and Employee Network Groups to impact key organizational and business objectives. Learn more by visiting www.ergcouncil.com. About PRISM International, Inc. PRISM, a Talent Dimensions company, is a full-service provider of innovative and proven consulting, training and products for leveraging diversity and inclusion, addressing unconscious bias, increasing cross-cultural competencies and creating more effective ERGs and Diversity Councils. Learn more by visiting www.prismdiversity.com.


Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) and the Airport Consultants Council (ACC) Sign Memorandum of Understanding to Collaborate in Advancing Diversity and Business Opportunities in Aviation

The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) and the Airport Consultants Council (ACC) signed a historic Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that commits the organizations to formally collaborate in advancing diversity and promoting opportunities for companies within the aviation industry by leveraging their collective membership and training resources. Both organizations seek to promote best practices and opportunities for their member companies to succeed in airport development pursuits. The MOU states that the organizations “recognize that increased diversity within the airport development industry will foster benefits and help fill the pipeline of future development experts.” Under the terms of the MOU, AMAC and ACC will endeavor to: • Identify and implement specific actions to identify and promote best practices in airport development projects;

  • Educate their respective members and airports on teaming, procurement, contracting and business best practices in general;
  • Identify opportunities to attract more students into airport development careers;
  • Promote diversity in the industry; and
  • Educate their respective members and airports on best practices in diversity, equity, and inclusion as it relates to increasing aviation industry business and career opportunities for diverse/underrepresented individuals and companies.

AMAC Chief Operating Officer Anthony Barnes noted, “For 36 years, AMAC has been the driving force of eliminating barriers minority and women-owned companies face when seeking to engage in airport business and employment opportunities. Partnering with like-minded organizations, like ACC, will strengthen our impact in promoting a diverse and inclusive airport environment that fuels innovation and creativity when building our airports for the future.” “ACC has always appreciated the close partnership and shared goals we have with AMAC over the years,” said ACC President T.J. Schulz. “The signing of this MOU codifies this partnership and ACC’s commitment to advance airport development companies of all sizes in this challenging time for aviation. We also look forward to taking steps to work with AMAC on increasing opportunities for minorities to engage and succeed in this industry at this important time in our society.” About the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is the only national, non-profit trade association dedicated to advance the full participation of minorities and women in employment and contracting opportunities throughout the aviation and aerospace industries. Since 1984, AMAC has been at the forefront of nearly every national policy initiative impacting the participation of disadvantaged businesses in airport contracting. AMAC works consistently with Congress, the federal government, aviation trade associations and others as a resource for information, education, and guidance on business and employment matters. For more information, visit amac-org.com About the Airport Consultants Council (ACC) The Airport Consultants Council (ACC) is the global trade association that represents private businesses involved in the development and operations of airports and related facilities, focusing on the business interests of firms with airport-related technical expertise.


LULAC Scholarship Opportunity

The PowerUp Fund is offering $5,000 grants and intensive mentoring to Latino small businesses in your state! Applications are open until October 14. Google.org announced a $3M grant to Hispanics in Philanthropy’s PowerUp Fund to make this possible! Together with Ureeka—a community built to support and grow underrepresented small businesses—the PowerUp Fund will not only help grow Latino small businesses, but also help entrepreneurs build the skills to continue that growth in the future. Apply now at powerupfund.org/powerupfund About LULAC The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is the nation’s largest and oldest civil rights volunteer-based organization that empowers Hispanic Americans and builds strong Latino communities. Headquartered in Washington, DC, with 1,000 councils around the United States and Puerto Rico, LULAC’s programs, services and advocacy address the most important issues for Latinos, meeting critical needs of today and the future. For more information, visit www.LULAC.org


Register now for the 2020 AISES National Conference. This year is an all-virtual event.

All you have to do is register and voila! You’ll have great content at your fingertips fo r three fun-filled days. Be sure to visit the booths in our Exhibit Hall and chat with booth reps. Registration closes October 5. Wes Studi is the 2020 AISES National Conference Keynote Speaker. Cherokee actor, artist and musician Wes Studi, the first Native American actor to receive an Oscar, will be the keynote speaker at the all virtual 2020 AISES National Conference on October 15-17, 2020. Wes will share his experiences on the role of purpose, resiliency and increasing the visibility of Native representation and peoples in the communities that surround us, locally and internationally. Registration for the 2020 AISES National Conference is open until October 5. Learn more at conference.aises.org


CHCI Hispanic Heritage Month Events Recap First Ever All Virtual Leadership Conference and 43rd Annual Awards Gala

CHCI kicked off Hispanic Heritage Month with its signature events – an all virtual Leadership Conference on September 14-18, and the 43rd Annual Awards Gala on September 21. Combined, both events attracted more than 6,000 global and national industry leaders, public officials, community advocates, influencers, award-winning journalists, and other professionals from the public, private, and non-profit sector representing 46 states as well as Washington, DC and Puerto Rico, and 23 countries on six continents. The conference and gala program book is available here. The events were seen on the conference platform and through CHCI’s social media and other national digital news channels. We value your participation and comments about our event. Please take a few minutes to share your feedback on our event survey here. Access all conference and gala recordings below. Leadership Conference: Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, Day 4, Day 5 43rd Annual Awards Gala


US Organizations to Receive Diversity Impact Awards at October Conference

The Association of ERGs & Councils (a practice group of PRISM International, Inc. and Talent Dimensions) released their annual list of the Top 25 US Employee Resource Groups (ERGs), Top 10 Enterprise-Wide ERGs, Top 10 Diversity Action and Executive Sponsor Recognition Awards. These groups will be recognized at an award ceremony during the USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective Organizations 2020 ERG Leadership Summit Week: A Virtual Event October 19 – October 24, 2020. The Diversity Impact Awards™ was launched in 2020 and is the next iteration of the ERG & Council Honors Award™. The ERG & Council Honors Award™ was the first, and until recently, the only annual national award that recognized and honored the outstanding contributions and achievements of ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. It was established in 2008 by the Association of ERGs & Councils, a practice group of diversity and inclusion consulting and training firm PRISM International, Inc. In 2018, PRISM International was acquired by Talent Dimensions to help organizations weave Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DE&I) into the fabric of its culture. “This can only happen if the organization develops a DE&I strategy aligned to the business strategy and the appropriate structure exists to ensure successful implementation. Diversity Councils and ERGs (BRGs, Affinity Groups, Networks, etc.) serve as one of the most important levers to drive the tactical execution of that strategy,” shares Lynn Cowart, Principle and Chief Operations Office at Talent Dimensions. The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ were reimagined to leverage a data driven and scientifically validated model developed by Dr. Theresa Welbourne, Senior Affiliate Research Scientist at the USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective Organizations, Will and Maggie Brooke Professor in Entrepreneurship at the University of Alabama, and CEO of eePulse, to ensure buy-in from key stakeholders and drive greater learning. The awards were segmented to create a level playing field for individual ERGs, enterprise-wide ERG programs and non-ERG Diversity initiatives. For the second year, we are honoring the important work of Executive Sponsors. “While we were excited to launch the new Diversity Impact Awards after almost a year of research and gaining input, launching a new awards structure during COVID-19 was challenging to say the least. We considered taking a hiatus given what organizations were experiencing. We quickly realized that this work was far too important and the individuals volunteering countless hours to create organizations where ALL people felt engaged, included and that they belong, must be recognized,” said Cile Johnson, Principle and Chief Business Officer at Talent Dimensions. “Our partnership with the USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective Organizations further supported the importance of the recognition of leaders and organizations.” The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards recipient rankings will be revealed at USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective (CEO) Organizations ERG Leadership Summit Week October 19 – October 24. The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ Top 25 ERG Award recipients in alphabetical order include:

  • American Airlines – Professional Women in Aviation EBRG
  • American Airlines – Latin Diversity Network EBRG
  • Bank of America – LEAD for Women
  • Blue Cross NC – GlobalNet
  • ChristianaCare – Women’s Employee Network (WEN)
  • Dominion Energy – We3
  • Erie Insurance – Women’s Affinity Group
  • Halliburton – Women Sharing Excellence
  • JetBlue – JetBlue African Diaspora Experience (JADE)
  • Mount Sinai Health System – Heritage of Latino Alliance Employee Resource Group
  • NextEra Energy – African American Employee Professional Group
  • NextEra Energy – Women in Energy
  • Northwestern Mutual – Asian Employee Resource Group
  • Northwestern Mutual – Women’s Employee Resource Group
  • Northwestern Mutual – Hispanic Employee Resource Group
  • Northwestern Mutual – Mutual disAbility Alliance
  • Northwestern Mutual – Military Veteran Employee Resource Group (MVERG)
  • Novant Health – Women’s Business Resource Group
  • Novant Health – Persons with Abilities Busines Resource Group
  • Novant Health – Black/African American Business Resource Group
  • Novant Health – Pride Business Resource Group
  • Novant Health – Veterans’ Business Resource Group
  • Rockwell Automation – Cultures Connected
  • Southern California Edison, Latinos for Engagement Advancement and Development (LEAD)
  • State Street – Professional Women’s Network Massachusetts Chapter (PWN-MA)

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ Top 10 Enterprise-Wide ERG Award recipients in alphabetical order include:

  • American Airlines – Abraham’s Tent – Christian, Jewish, and Muslim EBRGs
  • Asurion – Asurion ERGs
  • Bank of America – Bank of America Enterprise ERGs
  • Banner Health – Team Member Resource Group (TMRGs) Launch
  • Cigna – Employee Resource Groups
  • Northern Trust – Northern Trust Business Resource Council Advisory Council (BRCAC)
  • Perdue Farms, Inc. – “Day of Understanding”
  • Southern Company Gas – 2019 ERG Program Expansion/Evolution
  • Tennessee Valley Authority – TVA ERG Collaboration
  • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center – Diversity Council and Employee Networks

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards Top 10 Diversity Action Award recipients in alphabetical order include:

  • American Airlines – Virtual Inclusion Week
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana – Strategic Plan
  • Froedtert Health – Disability Etiquette
  • Halliburton – Focus on Family
  • Mount Sinai Beth Israel – Go Red Event
  • NASCAR – Heritage History Series
  • Novant Health – Health Equity Council
  • Novant Health – Cross Cultural Communications Program
  • Portsmouth Naval Shipyard – Disability Etiquette: Perspective Changing Training
  • Ricoh – International Women’s Day

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards Executive Sponsor of the Year recipients in alphabetical order:

  • Dominion Energy – Wendy Wellener, Vice President – Shared Services
  • NextEra Energy, Inc. – Kate Stengle, Vice President Internal Audit
  • Northern Trust – Shundrawn Thomas, President of Northern Trust Asset Management (NTAM)
  • Novant Health – Chere Gregory, MD, SVP Chief Health Equity Officer Diversity & Inclusion

About the Diversity Impact Awards™ The Diversity Impact Awards™ program was launched in 2020 and is the next iteration of the ERG & Council Honors Award™. The ERG & Council Honors Award™ was the first, and until recently, the only annual national award that recognized and honored the outstanding contributions and achievements of ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. The new award process leverages a data driven and scientifically validated model to create collective learning within and across organizations. The honor award was established in 2008 by the Association of ERGs & Councils, a practice group of diversity and inclusion consulting and training firm PRISM International, Inc. About the ERG & Council Conference™ ERGs and Diversity Councils are vital links for improving organizational results. However, to remain impactful and effective, they need opportunities to increase their skills and knowledge and to learn and share best practices. They need opportunities to network, celebrate and grow. This was the purpose of the first annual conference designed specifically for ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. Learn more by visiting http://www.ergcouncilconference.com. About the Association of ERGs & Councils The Association of ERGs & Councils is a practice group of PRISM International, Inc. and the premier resource for transforming Employee Resource Groups, Diversity Councils and Employee Network Groups to impact key organizational and business objectives. Learn more by visiting www.ergcouncil.com. About PRISM International, Inc. PRISM, a Talent Dimensions company, is a full-service provider of innovative and proven consulting, training and products for leveraging diversity and inclusion, addressing unconscious bias, increasing cross-cultural competencies and creating more effective ERGs and Diversity Councils. Learn more by visiting www.prismdiversity.com. About USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective Organizations Since its founding over 40 years ago, the Center for Effective Organizations (CEO), a research center in the USC Marshall School of Business, is world-renowned for its breakthrough research and insights on organizational performance, effectiveness and talent management. Today, CEO is at the forefront, discovering and creating the latest knowledge in the design and management of organizations for companies that range from mid-sized to the Global 500. CEO’s worldwide network includes research scientists, faculty experts, best-selling authors, and corporate partners. Working together, they provide forward-thinking leaders with trusted insights and the hands-on learning they need to help them solve complex problems and build highly effective, sustainable organizations.


HACU’s virtual Town Hall to focus on the 2020 Presidential Election: Its Impact on Latinos and Hispanic Higher Education, Oct. 28

The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities will present a Town Hall on “The 2020 Presidential Election: Its Impact on Latinos and Hispanic Higher Education,” Oct. 28, 2020, 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. PT /4:30 – 5:30 p.m. CT /5:30 – 6:30 p.m. ET. The Town Hall is part of its 34th Annual Conference, being offered virtually under the theme, “Championing Hispanic Higher Education: Fostering Excellence and Social Justice,” Oct. 26-28. The Town Hall will feature a panel of experts who will discuss the 2020 presidential election, and where each candidate stands on key issues, particularly education, and how their policies would impact Latinos in the U.S. The panelists will also analyze the decisions made by the elected candidates regarding elementary, secondary, and higher education and their impact on Hispanic-Serving Institutions, specifically, and the nearly 20 million college students enrolled in higher education nationwide. The Town Hall will be moderated by Adela de la Torre, Ph.D., president, San Diego State University. Speakers will include: Sonja Diaz, Esq., executive director, University of California Los Angeles, Latino Policy & Politics Initiative; Ted Mitchell, Ph.D., president, American Council on Education; and Mark Hugo Lopez, Ph.D., director, Global Migration and Demography Research, Pew Research Center. HACU’s premier conference on Hispanic higher education provides a unique forum for the sharing of information and ideas for the best and most promising practices in the education of Hispanics and promotes and expands partnerships and strategic alliances for collaboration between HACU-member institutions and public- and private-sector organizations. Registration for HACU’s 34th Annual Conference and pre- and post-conference events is available here. ________________________________________

LULAC Kicks Off Campaign For Hunger Relief Across USA

Nation’s Leading Latino Civil Rights Organization Joins with Promotores Unidos USA to Help Latinos Hard Hit by COVID-19 Washington, DC – The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), in partnership with Promotores Unidos USA, today announced a $250,000 hunger relief campaign funded by Corona and Modelo beer brands that will reach several of America’s largest cities where Latino communities have suffered economically, in addition to some of the highest rates of impact from the novel coronavirus. “LULAC is proud to be part of a wonderful partnership with some of the most well-known brands in the world as well as beloved entertainment giants in music today,” said Sindy Benavides, Chief Executive Officer of LULAC. “Our one goal as a team is to help bring sorely needed food to the tables of as many of the nation’s essential workers in our communities as possible. While others are working day and night to find a vaccine against COVID-19, LULAC is hard at work with Corona and Modelo beer brands and Promotores Unidos USA to do everything we can to bring meals to the families most affected. The project was created by Promotores Unidos USA and the Corona and Modelo beer brands with the assistance of the ROOX Agency and seeks to impact the most vulnerable. The Unidos Por Impacto Hunger Relief campaign features artists brought by Promotores Unidos USA to help increase awareness and extend the Latino community’s gratitude to millions of people working daily to keep the country going during COVID-19. The artists would provide recorded messages of encouragement to the community, including reminders on the importance of wearing a mask and social distancing. “I am so proud to work alongside LULAC, beloved beer brands Corona and Modelo, and various organizations who share the common values of giving and social responsibility. This is the time to show solidarity and support to those who need it the most during frightening and uncertain times,” said Pedro Zamora, President of Promotores Unidos USA. Partner stores in the campaign include: La Michoacana Meat Market – Dallas and Houston, Texas; Cermak Produce, Super Espiga – Chicago, Illinois; Numero Uno Market – Los Angeles, California. Together, the Corona and Modelo beer brands will contribute $250,000 to the national Unidos Por Impacto Hunger Relief campaign, which will go directly to relief efforts supporting families in disproportionately-affected Latino communities in eight major metro areas across the country. “Our brands have an established history of giving back to the communities where we live and work, including initiatives like this one that provide support for our bar and restaurant partners and their employees,” said John Alvarado, SVP, Brand Marketing Beer Division, Constellation Brands. “We are honored to have our Corona and Modelo beer brands contribute to the work LULAC and Promotores Unidos are doing to raise awareness of the devastating impact COVID-19 has on the Latino community and help provide direct relief to those most in need during this critical time.” The Unidos Por Impacto Hunger Relief Project includes New York City, Dallas, Houston, Miami, Chicago, Bakersfield – Tulare, Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area. The full $250,000 donation from the Corona and Modelo beer brands will be distributed across these areas to help ensure food security in vulnerable Hispanic populations. Recipients can apply for gift cards which they will be able to cash for food items at tiendas, supermercados and bodegas in their communities. The campaign will also help boost local economies for neighborhood businesses hurt by the pandemic. The project kicks off Saturday, September 5th, and will continue for two months through Thursday, October 15th. To learn more or to apply for the gift cards, visit lulac.org/unidos. ________________________________________

American Indian College Fund Announces 2020-21 Student Ambassador Cohort

The American Indian College Fund selected and trained 12 new student ambassadors for its 2020 cohort. Now in its sixth year, the College Fund Student Ambassador Program trains American Indian and Alaska Native students to serve as leaders in their communities, to work to combat stereotypes, and to create greater visibility of Native Americans and an understanding of the importance of their diverse cultures. With 42% of the Native American population today under the age of 24, the opportunity to educate the next generation of young Native leaders to realize their potential and to advocate for their communities is at a tipping point. Creating greater visibility about the importance of higher education for Native students is crucial to creating a better future for Native peoples and communities. College Fund student ambassadors promote higher education and visibility of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN) and inspiring the next generation of Native students in media interviews, at cultural events, in their communities, and on their campuses. The 2020 cohort also received advocacy training to help them spearhead engagement and action for issues impacting Native communities. This year the multi-day training program was moved online, still providing student ambassadors with leadership development, public speaking, interviewing, writing, and social media training in an interactive modular format. The virtual format allowed attendees the additional opportunity to participate in conversations about career planning and persistence with professionals in their fields. Special guests included veteran Native American actor Zahn McClarnon (recent credits include television shows Barkskins, Longmire, Fargo, and Westworld and the movie Dr. Sleep) who was joined by his mother, a longtime professional educator; and Kevin McDermott, a retired NFL long snapper who played for the San Francisco 49ers, Denver Broncos, Baltimore Ravens, and Minnesota Vikings before leaving the NFL to launch his dream career in finance. The 2020-21 American Indian College Fund Student Ambassadors are:

  • Lyndsey Blanco (Tlingit and Haida Central Council), a business administration major at Ilisagvik College in Alaska;
  • Kimberly Blevins (Mandan Hidatsa Arikara Nation), an environmental science master’s program student at Sitting Bull College in North Dakota;
  • Natasha Goldtooth (Diné), an agroecology/environmental science major at Diné College in Arizona;
  • Spring Grey Bear (Standing Rock Sioux Tribe), a business administration major at United Tribes Technical College in North Dakota;
  • Kenwa Kravitz (Pit River/Wintu), a native studies leadership major at Northwest Indian College in Washington;
  • Emily Lockling (Fond du Lac Band of Superior Chippewa), an environmental science major at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College in Minnesota;
  • Jacob McArthur (White Earth Ojibwe Nation), a business administration major at Bemidji State University in Minnesota;
  • Tori McConnell (Yurok Tribe), a neurology, physiology, and behavior major at the University of California Davis in California;
  • Jamison Nessman (White Earth Nation), a pre-medicine student at Bemidji State University in Minnesota;
  • Chandra Norton (Hoopa Vakkey Tribe), a community advocate and responsive education in human services major at Northwest Indian College in Washington;
  • David Plant (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes), a business management major at Salish Kootenai College in Montana.
  • Amanda Ruiz (Sicangu Lakota), a natural science degree and pre-engineering major at Oglala Lakota College in South Dakota;
  • Christopher Villaruel (Ajumawi/Pit River), a Forestry Hydrology Major at Humbodlt State University in California;
  • Lester Wells (Crow Creek Sioux Tribe), a Lakota leadership and management master’s program major with an education administration emphasis at Oglala Lakota College in South Dakota; and
  • Jade Yazzie (Diné), a food and nutrition in dietetics major at Montana State University in Montana.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


LULAC Virtual Summit Sucess Is A Preview To Future Advocacy

Nation’s Oldest and Largest Latino Civil Rights Organization Says COVID-19 Speeds Up a Move Toward More Use of Technology

Washington, DC – The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) 2020 Virtual Summit, “All for One, One for All: United in Action to Transform America” drew the largest continuous online audience in the organization’s history during nearly 30 hours of programming and more than 80 content experts, speakers and elected officials. “Our analysis of the summit results clearly shows that this is a step in the right direction,” says Sindy Benavides, National Chief Executive Officer. “From the programmatic perspective of LULAC’s mission, we were able to touch more people in a concentrated period of time while being very cognizant of their safety and well-being given the coronavirus. We don’t know how long COVID-19 will last but LULAC is well poised to accelerate and amplify advocacy using virtual platforms to continue our momentum during a very important time of social change. As LULAC continues to protect and defend our community in every aspect, we will use technology for good to transform the way we connect and take actions,” she added. The summit’s first address was by House Majority Whip James Clyburn whose stirring words reminded attendees of the “calling to serve, not for self, but others” while the “duty of our freedom is to lift those most oppressed” as he saluted LULAC’s legacy of leadership. Following his address, the plenary session that followed highlighted the need for coalitions as one of the most important tools when confronting institutional bias and racism. The conversation featured a powerhouse of the nation’s leading social justice leaders: LULAC National President Domingo Garcia, YWCA National Chief Executive Officer Alejandra Castillo, NAACP President and CEO Derrick Johnson, National Urban League President and CEO Marc Morial, and Anti-Defamation League (ADL) CEO and National Director Jonathan Greenblatt. “Nothing is going to stop LULAC right now,” says Domingo Garcia, National President. “We don’t have time to wait as Jose and Maria are getting infected and dying from COVID-19 while keeping the country going. Social justice is not a black-only or brown-only problem. It is everyone’s problem because this country needs our labor today as much as it did in the past but now we have the laws, the votes and the will to use both to create systemic changes. This summit shows Latinos are technology-savvy and we can use it both as a tool and a weapon to defend ourselves from those who try to do our communities harm,” he added. This session was followed by examining the effects of inequities for Latinos in accessing quality healthcare even for essential COVID-19 services, shifting immigration policies including family separations to denial of protections for asylum-seekers and increased swift deportations, plus a timely discussion on the economic impact the pandemic is having on Latino families and how financial literacy is vital. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi opened day two of the LULAC Summit with a call to action for the country’s 60-million Latinos with a challenge to confront long-held racial and gender exclusionary practices, replacing these with a new wave of opportunities for every man, woman and child in America. That message was affirmed by former HUD Secretary and presidential candidate Julian Castro who stated change must be accelerated and called November 3rd a “tipping point moment” in modern history for the United States. Another historic moment for LULAC was taking a hard look at safety in the military ranks for Latino men and women. U.S. Secretary of the Army Ryan McCarthy told the audience that the death of Army Pvt. Vanessa Guillen at Fort Hood, Texas, was tragedy that must now be a call to action to ensure that women in uniform as well as men are not the victims of sexual harassment, abuse or worse. Secretary McCarthy pointed to the creation of an independent committee to examine reports of Military Sexual Trauma (MST) as evidence that the Army supports increased oversight and investigations when warranted. Although this is a first step, LULAC is also calling for a Congressional hearing on soldier Guillen and the issue of harassment across all branches in the military. The panel discussion that followed included Captain (Ret.) Quetta Rodriguez, USMC, Colonel (Ret.) Michelle Hernandez de Fraley Ph.D., U.S. Army, Colonel (Ret.) Lisa Carrington Firmin, USAF and Lt. Colonel (Ret.) Carrie F. Ricci, U.S. Army. Equally important was the panel discussion on the importance of Latinos having access to technology and broadband internet service during COVID-19 restrictions limiting face-to-face contacts in schools, government services and other daily needs. The day’s culminating session was an informative and insightful examination of the state of our environment and its impact on communities of color in health, economics and overall quality of life. Also, the panel brought forth a future generations’ perspective to the conversation and the challenge that present day political and social leaders must accept as more of the effects of climate change become irreversible. An inspiring presentation followed by ABC News Correspondent John Quinoñes who shared the personal challenges he overcame to achieve a 35-year career on the network. Today, he is one of American television’s most recognized news talents as creator and anchor of “What would you do?” The program allows us see ourselves the way others may. “Day two of the virtual summit was really about awakening to the fallacy that we can accept change incrementally when every indicator clearly shows there are imperatives to confront and time is not our friend,” says Benavides. “From Speaker Pelosi and Secretary Castro’s powerful messages of putting democracy into action to danger in the ranks for Latino servicemen and women and then, the real and practical implications of technology, environmental justice in our daily lives and one journalist’s life work to uplift the Latino story. LULAC’s focus has never been clearer, our resolve stronger and the moment to act more necessary than now,” she adds. The climax of LULAC’s three-day virtual summit was the participation of Jill Biden, former Second Lady and wife of Democratic presidential candidate, Joe Biden. “I guarantee you, Latinos will have a place at the table,” she told the national audience referring to a Biden-Harris Administration following the upcoming presidential election. Dr. Biden was critical of how Latinos have fared during COVID-19 suffering disproportionate health and economic losses and assured the nation’s Latinos and communities of color that access to affordable health care continues to be a worthwhile and necessary goal for America. “LULAC leads, never follows because we are about taking action,” says Garcia. “No government agency whether federal, state or local has done what we have during this virtual summit of making sure the Latino community has the information they need to survive. It is wrong for them to be criticized for getting infected from COVID-19 when it’s President Trump forcing them to go into packing plants dealing with the virus but then says he has no responsibility for them getting sick. It is wrong for Latino kids to fail in school but then we fail to make sure they have access to the internet to access online learning and study at home during this pandemic and not fall behind. And it is wrong for our community to be told you don’t vote but then we see Republican governors and other elected officials doing voter suppression to block our votes. This is the first LULAC virtual summit and we promise, to continue to stay connected to garner action,” adds Garcia. To see an encore presentation of the 2020 LULAC Virtual Summit, which was a 100% Latino production, please see: www.lulac.org/summit2020/


Trans and non-binary people in STEM: Apply for a Ben Barres Fellowship, deadline 9/30/2020

NOGLSTP is proud to offer the Ben Barres Fellowship. The fellowship is a $2000-$5000 award for professional development of trans, intersex, and non-binary graduate students and post-doctoral fellows in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The Ben Barres Fellowship is a merit-based award, and the support provided is intended, broadly construed, for the recipient’s professional development. Examples of eligible purposes include research support; conference/workshop attendance, or research travel; equipment/supplies; research assistant or translation services; and/or other professional uses. The fund is not intended to support personal expenses unrelated to research, such as food or rent. To apply for The Ben Barres Fellowship, applicants will provide a brief description of their current research and research/career goals, a 2-3 paragraph funding proposal, a personal statement, their CV, and answers to demographics questions. Each application must have one letter of support, which may be written by any of the following: PI, Mentor, Advisor, or Colleague. The letter of support will be submitted by the recommender (not the applicant). Applications will be evaluated on clarity of written proposal, impact of proposed funding on applicant’s career, contributions to STEM and LGBTQ+ communities, and strength of support letter. If awarded funds, the recipient will upload a brief report and expense receipts within 6 months of receiving the award. Apply here: https://www.noglstp.org/programs-projects/ben-barres-fellowship/ Recipients of the fellowship will retain the option of remaining anonymous in public announcements of the award. Alternatively, they may choose to be publicly acknowledged in NOGLSTP’s publicity campaigns. Awards will range from $2000 to $5000 per recipient. Application deadline for the first round of awards is September 30,2020. Award decisions will be announced the first week of December. If any money is left, there will be additional rounds of awards until all the money has been awarded. About NOGLSTP NOGLSTP was established in 1980, incorporated in the State of California in 1991, and was granted IRS 501 (c) 3 non-profit status in 1992. NOGLSTP’s mission is to educate the scientific and general communities about the presence and accomplishments of LGBT individuals in STEM professions. NOGLSTP presents educational symposia and workshops nationwide. NOGLSTP fosters dialog with other professional societies, academia, and industry to facilitate diversity and inclusion in the workplace. NOGLSTP is an affiliate of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, is a participating professional society member of MentorNet®, a sustaining member of the National Postdoctoral Association, a partner with the Higher Education Recruitment Consortium (HERC) and a founding member of the E-Week Diversity Council. For more information, visit the website at www.noglstp.org


Cheryl Crazy Bull, President of American Indian College Fund, Receives Legacy Award from Working Mother Media

Denver, Colo.—July 30, 2020– Working Mother Media presented Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund President, with its Legacy Award on Wednesday, July 22, during its Multicultural Women’s Conference, which was hosted virtually due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Working Mother Media established the Legacy Award in 2005 to honor one extraordinary individual for her inspiration, dedication, and contributions to the advancement of multicultural women in the workplace and beyond. In particular, the organization honors women from public and non-profit sectors for their outstanding work that creates opportunity and well-being on many levels for women, girls, and communities. Cheryl Crazy Bull was selected for the award because of her extensive experience with the tribal college movement and her tireless work in supporting Native student success and education. Her long history of education, activism, and community growth has been documented and exemplary, and has created a lasting legacy built on advancing Native voices that will continue far into the future. Subha V. Barry, President, Working Mother Media, said, “This award acknowledges the incredible and courageous women who are out there in the field doing the hard work and making a difference, being mentors, leaders and examples to others—and who are creating a legacy and vision for future women.” Cheryl_Crazy_BullCheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “Receiving this award is an honor that goes beyond me. It is an award that I accept on behalf of all indigenous women who want to be seen, those who have gone into the spirit world who we must remember, those who are here now and need our support, and those who are coming who need our seventh generation vision. Many of our Tribal nations survived because women adapted to the new world, kept our traditions alive, and passed our knowledge to our children. I want to recognize my colleagues at the American Indian College Fund, and especially to honor the women of the tribal college movement today, the women who helped found our tribal colleges and universities and who served and serve as presidents and as faculty and staff, the women who are our students.” According to the Working Mother Research Institute’s “On the Verge” study, 50% of multicultural working women considered leaving their companies within a year. On top of bias and lack of support, multicultural women are also disproportionately impacted socio-economically, and struggle with building strategic relationship capital that would elevate their careers. During the pandemic, multicultural women are faced with even greater challenges than before. The Multicultural Women’s Conference gives working women the tools needed to lead effectively in trying times. While studies show that women of color bring higher levels of education, ambition, and diverse ideas to the workplace, the conference tasked organizations and individuals to explore ways to ensure talented multicultural women stay engaged and connected while being inclusive and helping them to build networks, new skills, and cultural leadership competencies in today’s environment. About Working Mother Media— Working Mother Media’s (WMM) mission is to serve as a champion of culture change. WMM publishes Working Mother magazine and its companion website, workingmother.com, which is the only national magazine for career-committed mothers. WMM also produces 20-plus events dedicated to the advancement of women, work and life, and helping organizations build inclusive workplace cultures. About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org. Photo: Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO, American Indian College Fund


American Indian College Fund Awarded $50,000 Rise Prize

The American Indian College Fund was awarded a $50,000 Rise Prize to create both a higher education cohort of Native student mothers and programming that is responsive to their unique needs as college students. The program will be called Ina Wa Wounspe Pi,” Lakota for Mothers Who Are Learning. The “Rise Prize” is a collective effort between Imaginative Futures, the Lumina Foundation and ten partner organizations focused on the success of parent students in higher education. Organizations based in the United States of any age, size, or type that are currently working on direct impact initiatives for student parents and other students, including high education institutions, for-profit companies, and non-profit organizations like the American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) were eligible to apply for the competitive prize. The College Fund was one of eight of 383 applicants that was chosen to receive $50,000 for their efforts programming efforts in working with student parents. Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “On behalf of the College Fund, I appreciate the opportunity through the Rise Prize to focus resources on supporting student mothers. While all parents and guardians are valued by us, we welcome resources to help mothers pursue their educational dreams. They inspire us and with coaching and programs directed at their success, we look forward to their bright futures.” With the Rise Prize, the American Indian College Fund will be collecting data on the cohort’s outcomes to examine other cohorts that can be created to meet student coaching needs. About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

 

Ricky D. Smith of Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport Elected National Chair of AMAC’s Board of Directors

The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is pleased to announce the election of Ricky D. Smith, Chief Executive Officer of BWI Marshall Airport as the National Chair of its Board of Directors. A 30-year transportation professional, Smith was appointed to lead the Maryland Aviation Administration (MAA) in 2015, where he oversees the management and operations of BWI Marshall Airport, Martin State Airport, and regional aviation activities throughout the State of Maryland. He has also served as Chief Executive Officer of the Cleveland Airport System, as well as leadership roles in the private sector with recognizable companies such as International Business Machines, H&R Block Business Services, and The May Company. Smith’s experience and accolades make him an ideal leader to navigate AMAC through the current social and business climate. He has been recognized as ‘Man of the Year’ by Women Transportation Seminar, ‘Power 10 CEO’ by the Baltimore Business Journal (2018), ‘People Who Move America’ by the Boys Scouts of America (2018), ‘Thomas G. Newsome Founder’s Leadership Award’ by the Conference of Minority Transportation Officials (2018), ‘Influential Marylander’ by The Daily Record (2017), the Maryland Washington Minority Companies Association ‘Black History Hero’ award (2017), ‘Most Influential CEO in Northeast Ohio’ by Crain’s Magazine (2014, 2013), ‘National Executive of the Year’ by the Conference of Minority Transportation Officials (2010), and ‘Congressional Achievement Award’ from Congressman Elijah Cummings (2006). “During this period of unprecedented public health challenges and heightened awareness around social injustices, I could not be prouder and more humbled by the AMAC community’s confidence in my leadership,” Executive Director Smith said. “I am joined by a Board of Directors that is committed to addressing the myriad of challenges affecting women and minorities in the aviation industry. “We are keen on our charge to reposition AMAC as one of the more influential and consequential trade organizations in the industry as we enhance our response to the membership, strengthen our alliance with like-minded organizations, and expand our connection with the many under-represented minority-owned businesses and professionals across the industry,” he said. “I look forward to leading through these challenges and opportunities.” About the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is the only national, non-profit trade association dedicated to advance the full participation of minorities and women in employment and contracting opportunities throughout the aviation and aerospace industries. Since 1984, AMAC has been at the forefront of nearly every national policy initiative impacting the participation of disadvantaged businesses in airport contracting. AMAC works consistently with Congress, the federal government, aviation trade associations and others as a resource for information, education, and guidance on business and employment matters. For more information, visit www.amac-org.com

Hispanicize #UnidosTogether Virtual Summit Recap

Inaugural Hispanicize #UnidosTogether Virtual Summit Featuring Fat Joe, Dascha Polanco, John Leguizamo, Luis Guzman, Dolores Huerta And Others Delivered Record Numbers – Follow-Up Event Planned For Hispanic Heritage Month

NGL Collective’s Hispanicize #UnidosTogether Virtual Summit was the largest virtual gathering of Latinx influencers, content creators, entrepreneurs, media and entertainment innovators ever assembled. Grounded by NGL’s #UnidosTogether initiative aimed at being a force for good in the Latinx community, the FREE half-day virtual summit took place on Wednesday, July 1st and represented a massive opportunity for brands to meaningfully connect with the Latinx audience during COVID recovery, while actively participating in the important conversation surrounding Black and Brown communities. Hispanicize #UnidosTogether Virtual Summit featured influencers, tastemakers, content creators, celebrities, executives and entrepreneurs and proudly shined a light on Latinx frontline heroes and small business owners alike. Roundtables, Keynotes and Break-Out sessions covered topics spanning Activism, TV & Film, Media & Marketing, Music, Social Influencers and more wrapped in the positive energy with which Hispanicize is synonymous. Popular TV and Radio personalities Jessica Flores (@YoJessicaFlores) and Enrique Sapene (@EnriqueSapene), brought their original styles and passion for Hispanicize and #UnidosTogether as co-hosts. Speakers Included: Fat Joe (Rapper/Actor), John Leguizamo (Actor, Activist & NGL Partner), Residente (Rapper & Advocate For Human Rights), Luis Guzman (Actor, Activist), Dolores Huerta (Legendary Civil Rights Activist, American Labor Leader), Dascha Polanco (Actor, In The Upcoming ‘In The Heights’), Diane Guerrero (Actor, Orange Is The New Black), Tatiana Hazel (Singer, Songwriter & Producer), Julissa Bermudez (TV Personality & Host), Gloria Calderon Kellett (Showrunner, One Day At A Time), Luis Guzman (Actor & Activist), Beatriz Acevedo (Entrepreneur, Cultural Strategist & Social Advocate), Yvette Pena (VP, Multicultural Leadership, AARP), Esperanza Teasdale (VP & General Manager, PepsiCo Beverages North America), Margie Bravo (Multicultural Shopper & Marketing Strategist, Nestle), Maria Teresa Kumar (Founder & President, Voto Latino), Monica Style Muse (Fashion & Beauty Blogger), Yarel Ramos (TV Personality & Host), Andrea Chediak (TV Journalist & Mom Influencer), Sandy Bodeau (Siramara) (TV Personality & Mom Influencer), Elisamar Rosado (Fashion & Mom Blogger), Jesus Revulcaba (Owner & Creative Director, Paper Tacos), Marcela Arrieta (Founder, Majestic Bliss Soaps), Paola Ramos (Journalist), Kim Guerra (Brown Badass Bonita – Activist & Author), Ana Flores (Founder & CEO, We All Grow Latina Network), RaqC (TV & Radio Personality / Entrepreneur, Luis Miranda Jr. (Founding Partner, MirRam Group), DJ Vinnie Mack (DJ), Mario Selman (Social Influencer), Xime Ponch (Social Influencer), Rico Swann & Daniel Manhattan (Founders, Lemonade Stand NY), Rosaura Quinteros (Orlando Health Dr. P. Phillips Hospital – LatinXLNCE Honoree), Dr. Ramon Tallaj & Dr. Yomaris Peña (Somos Community Care – Latin XLNCE Honorees), and others to be announced. Sponsors Included: PepsiCo, Google, Nielsen and Bumble Event Highlights Included: LatinXCLNCE Awards (Honoring Latinx COVID-19 frontline heroes), Latinx Small Business Spotlights (Inspiring stories of Latinx entrepreneurs pivoting their businesses during the pandemic), Mercadito Virtual by Molcajete Dominguero (Featuring 30+ Latinx small businesses virtually pitching their products and services) and a Special Musical Performance (Featuring Indie-pop break-out artist, Tatiana Hazel). The Hispanicize #UnidosTogether Virtual Summit attracted over 7,300 attendees, who along with others generated upwards of 43 million impressions in support of the event across their social media footprints before, during and afterwards. Building off of the success of the first virtual summit, a follow-up event has already been scheduled for Thursday, October 15th as part of Hispanic Heritage Month celebrations representing the 11th annual Hispanicize since its creation over a decade ago. Co-founded by actor John Leguizamo, NGL Collective is a pioneer of new media and entertainment that connects advertisers and New Generation Latinx (NGLs) across platforms in-language, in-culture, and in-context. NGL acquired Hispanicize last year, and presented the iconic event for FREE and in a virtual format for the first time ever. To see the replay, visit www.Hispanicize.com.


American Indian College Fund Statement: Re-Name Mascots to End Harmful Stereotypes

#TheTimeIsNow for racist sports team names and mascots to be renamed. The American Indian College Fund appreciates its long-time mission supporters, FedEx, Nike, and Walmart. They have chosen to stand alongside indigenous groups across the United States to amplify our voices and to call upon the Washington NFL team to change its name. We are proud to call you our allies. Indigenous people are a vibrant part of both our nation’s history and modern-day America. Eliminating mascots that reinforce harmful stereotypes sends a powerful message to our children that we value all histories, cultures, and perspectives, helping to foster confidence, growth, and success from kindergarten to college graduation and to build a better future for all. #ChangeTheName. #NotYourMascot. Cheryl_Crazy_BullCheryl Crazy Bull President and CEO, American Indian College Fund About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


AT&T Contributes $350K to American Indian College Fund

Charity Offering Native Student Scholarships and College Readiness Programs to Increase Number of Native Americans With A Higher Education

Denver, Colo., June 30, 2020—COVID-19 had a more devastating impact on Native American communities than others. Because only 14% of American Indians and Alaska Natives have a college degree—less than half of that of other groups, the American Indian College Fund was understandably worried about the impact of the virus on students entering college for the first time in the fall and the persistence of those already in college. Thanks to the continued support of AT&T with a $350,000 contribution to the American Indian College Fund’s Braided Success: Fostering Native Student Success from High School to College and Career program, high school and college students in the Tohono O’odham Community College in Sells, Arizona and College of Muscogee Nation in Okmulgee, Oklahoma communities continued and will continue to be supported in their quest for a higher education. The American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) created two interlocking programs with the grant to increase Native student access to higher education and success. Braiding Support will provide $100,000 in scholarship support over the period of one year to American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) students from Oklahoma and Arizona seeking to attend a tribal college (TCU) or mainstream institution located in their home states. Braiding Success will develop partnerships between the Tohono O’oodham Community College (Sells, Ariz.) and the College of Muscogee Nation (Okmulgee, Okla.) and the local high schools serving their tribal communities, and employers. In the first three years of the program, the College of Muscogee Nation partnered with three local high schools and offered three dual enrollment programs. Of the 157 Native high school student participants, 33% took college courses through the dual-enrollment program. Participants also enjoyed college visits. Similarly, TOCC partnered with two local high schools to launch its S.T.A.R.T. program—Students Thriving, Achieving, and Rising Together. Thirty-eight percent of all partner high school students are served by S.T.A.R.T., and of that number, 42% of the students participated in the dual-enrollment program with TOCC. Students also enjoyed after-school programs and tutoring sessions. The result was that students who participated in the TCU’s programs graduated from high school at rates more than 20% higher than Native Americans nationally. By continuing the strong relationships forged between college the high schools and TCUs, the Braiding Success initiative also better prepares students who transition to college for an easier transition to higher education and employment. Program managers at the TCUs are looking at ways to navigate the landscape with COVID-19, ensuring that students continue to have access to the program opportunities in a safe way to maintain the health of Native students and their communities. Program activities include college and career fairs, sponsored visits to employers to explore career opportunities with working professionals in students’ fields of interest and integrating coaching for student’s college and career success. Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “AT&T is on the leading edge of engaging best practices supporting career pathways for indigenous students through its support of the College Fund’s student success programming. This partnership builds on our shared vision of helping students achieve their dreams.” “AT&T has a long history of supporting initiatives that help Native American students graduate from high school and succeed in college and career,” said Tom Brooks, vice president of external affairs, AT&T. “We’re proud to further our commitment to Native communities with this contribution and connect Native youth to educational pathways that lead to careers in the 21st century workforce.” About Philanthropy & Social Innovation at AT&T — AT&T Inc. is committed to advancing education, strengthening communities and improving lives. We have a long history of investing in projects that create learning opportunities, promote academic and economic achievement, and address community needs. Our AT&T Aspire initiative uses innovation in education to drive student success in school and beyond. With a financial commitment of $550 million since 2008, AT&T is leveraging technology, relationships and social innovation to help all students make their biggest dreams a reality. About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $208 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


United Health Foundation Grants $430K to American Indian College Fund to Expand Tribal Scholars Program

The United Health Foundation (UHF) is increasing its support of the American Indian College Fund’s United Health Foundation Tribal Scholars Program to ensure Native American communities have access to urgently needed health care with a $430,000 grant to provide 13 scholarships for American Indian and Alaska Natives studying in the health and dental fields. The COVID-19 crisis has highlighted the opportunity to address disparities in access to health care for underserved populations by increasing the number of minority health care providers to serve their communities. Studies show that American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) people lag behind other Americans with regard to health status. As a result, AIAN people born today have a life expectancy that is 5.5 years less than the U.S. population in all other races (73.0 years to 78.5 years, respectively), and AIAN people continue to die at higher rates than other Americans from diabetes mellitus, heart disease, and chronic lower respiratory diseases, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health. And today’s COVID-19 pandemic means Native people with chronic, underlying health conditions are at even greater risk. Lack of access to a dentist is also related to health problems. Periodontal disease (gum infection) is associated with increased risks for cancer and cardiovascular disease. Studies also show that people with poor oral health and bad teeth are often stigmatized socially and when individuals are seeking employment, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One major reason for health disparities in Native communities includes an insufficient supply of providers of health care services. “The American Indian College Fund is a longstanding partner we are honored to support – together, we are working to improve the capacity of the health care system to ensure Native communities receive the best quality care,” said Tracy Malone, president of the United Health Foundation. “Through this ongoing partnership, we are living our mission of building healthier communities by developing a modern health workforce that is culturally competent and can provide the right care at the right time.” Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “The College Fund appreciates that during this pandemic United Health Foundation is continuing its commitment to our scholars. Tribal people use our traditional ways of knowing and good relationships to support public health and the guidelines that will get us through this crisis. Together we are paving a healthy path for individuals and their families.” The goal of the American Indian College Fund’s United Health Foundation Tribal Scholars Program is to develop the next generation of Native health care providers to serve their communities with personalized, culturally competent care. The United Health Foundation has increased its support for the program by $70,000 this year to provide support to additional students. Rising sophomores who are studying to be a primary care physician, nurse, physician’s assistant, mental and behavioral health worker, dentist, or pharmacist are eligible for the scholarships, which total over $7,700 per year per student and are renewable for up to three years if students maintain their studies and a 3.0 grade point average. To apply for scholarships, please visit collegefund.org/scholarships. About the United Health Foundation — Through collaboration with community partners, grants and outreach efforts, the United Health Foundation works to improve our health system, build a diverse and dynamic health workforce and enhance the well-being of local communities. The United Health Foundation was established by UnitedHealth Group (NYSE: UNH) in 1999 as a not-for-profit, private foundation dedicated to improving health and health care. To date, the United Health Foundation has committed more than $500 million to programs and communities around the world. We invite you to learn more at UnitedHealthFoundation.org. About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $208 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


News for NGLCC

NGLCC logo HELPING THE LGBT BUSINESS COMMUNITY THROUGH THE COVID-19 CRISIS In our recent email blast we shared that NGLCC will always continue to work for you and our communities. We ask all stakeholders to check NGLCC’s social media pages for updates on business development webinars and trainings; online matchmakers, both B2B and corporate; support with drafting capability statements and RFPs; and much, much more to help our businesses and community stay strong and ready for the year ahead. We encourage all stakeholders to regularly check our landing page for Coronavirus relief and other essential updates: NGLCC Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). There you will find resources from the Small Business Administration, as well as NGLCC Corporate Partners, to assist small businesses with their recovery. Additionally, many NGLCC local affiliate chambers have regional information an economic recovery opportunities available. To find your closest local affiliate, click here. Special Resources: 1) NGLCC COVID-19 Resource Hub for the LGBT Business Community 2) LGBTBE Business Webinars And Video Resources During Covid-19 This page is dedicated to our network of exceptional, innovative Certified LGBT Business Enterprise® (Certified LGBTBE®) suppliers in the NGLCC network. Here you will find information on business development webinars and trainings; online matchmakers, both B2B and corporate; support with drafting capability statements and RFPs; and much, much more to help our businesses and community stay strong and ready for the year ahead. For funding and economic relief information, please visit our hub: NGLCC Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Additionally, many NGLCC local affiliate chambers have regional information an economic recovery opportunities available. To find your closest local affiliate, click here.


Henry Luce Foundation Grants $250,000 to American Indian College Fund to Assist Tribal College Faculty with Remote Instruction During Covid-19 Crisis

The Henry Luce Foundation granted the American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) $250,000 to provide faculty at tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) with the technology and support they need to make the transition to remote instruction during the Covid-19 crisis. TCUs are located on or near Indian reservations primarily in rural communities serving predominately Native American populations. It is not just Native students but entire Native communities, faculty included, that often lack the technological tools and resources to make the transition to on-line learning. As the virus outbreak impacted Native communities, the American Indian College Fund was concerned that it has the potential to reverse education attainment. Yet now more than ever educated citizens are needed as health care workers, social workers, teachers, and more. TCUs are geographically and culturally diverse that share common goals such as integrating cultural values and connection to land into curriculum and pedagogy while emphasizing community outreach and education rooted in tribal identity and practice. In 2017, over 11% of American Indian students studying at a U.S. two-or four-year public or private not-for-profit postsecondary institution attended one of the 35 accredited TCUs. Most TCUs operate much like community colleges while providing culturally and place-based higher education for Native American students and community members. The link between a TCU education and community progress was shown in The Alumni of Tribal Colleges and Universities Better Their Communities survey report published in September 2019 by Gallup and the American Indian College Fund. The report was the result of a survey of 5,000 American Indian College Fund scholars about the value of an education rooted in Native American values. The results show that 74% of TCU graduates surveyed forged careers serving their communities and societies, TCU graduates (43%) say they are more than twice as likely as American Indian/Alaska Native graduates of non-TCUs (21%) and college graduates nationally (18%) to have had a professor that cared about them as a person and excited them about learning and a mentor that encouraged them, and reported nearly twice as much as graduates nationwide that they are thriving financially, socially, and in their communities and careers. Thanks to the Henry Luce Foundation’s gift, the College Fund provided TCUs with direct technology and software support such as new laptops, computer upgrades, microphones, cameras, and Internet connectivity as well as support for online teaching, learning, and student engagement, including software, Learning Management System training, and assistance through an institutional online course delivery consultant. As the Covid19 situation continues, TCU faculty are now armed with the tools they need to ensure that their work continues uninterrupted. “We’re pleased to support the College Fund’s efforts to help tribal colleges continue their critical education work during this very challenging time,” said Sean T. Buffington, Luce Foundation Vice President. Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “We deeply appreciate the support of the Henry Luce Foundation in their unique commitment to TCU faculty. Our faculty are often tribal citizens and they are definitely all members of tribal communities, so they experience this crisis in the same ways as their students. The Foundation’s support is uplifting to TCU faculty and the students they educate.” About The Henry Luce Foundation — The Henry Luce Foundation seeks to enrich public discourse by promoting innovative scholarship, cultivating new leaders, and fostering international understanding. The Foundation advances its mission through grantmaking and leadership programs in the fields of Asia, higher education, religion and theology, art, and public policy. Established in 1936 by Henry R. Luce, the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Time, Inc., the Foundation’s earliest work honored his parents, missionary educators in China. The Foundation’s programs today reflect the value Mr. Luce placed on learning, leadership, and long-term commitment in philanthropy. About the American Indian College Fund – Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


NMSDC – A Message From The President

Like everyone in the network, NMSDC’s national office is innovating every day to keep our mission and our work moving forward during the COVID-19 virus emergency. Take a look at this new update from NMSDC President/CEO Adrienne C. Trimble about how the NMSDC is working in this environment – and how that is reshaping our plans for 2020. NMSDC is mobilizing on the virtual level. Our national office and our regional affiliates are all operating remotely, in safety and security, but we are still conducting business as usual. We are here for you, as always. We hope you are participating in our new, weekly virtual Town Halls – online every Thursday afternoon. Join us this week for our live stream on YouTube: How CPOs Are Responding: The Corporate Perspective on the COVID-19 Business Challenges. Technology is allowing NMSDC to keep the conversation going between MBEs and corporate members, even as we are all isolated. Engagement so far in the Town Halls has been vigorous, thought-provoking, and helpful in these difficult days. Stay tuned to your email and social media for more information on these can’t-miss events. Sadly, as you know, the health emergency has forced the postponement of Leadership Week and the Leadership Awards gala. We hope to reschedule or otherwise make the planned content and meetings available to you. We are also monitoring developments to see how they might affect our “destination” events later in 2020 – notably, the Program Managers’ Seminar July 14-16 in Orlando, and the annual Conference and Business Opportunity Exchange October 25-28 in Phoenix. We will keep you apprised of developments as they occur. Staying in touch is vital during this crisis. Never has it been more important for all of us to remember that, even from a distance … #WeAreNMSDC!


An Important PSA Message Regarding Covid-19 From Notah Begay III

Here is the list of athletes that will be sending out PSAs this week. We are using the following hashtag #ProtectOurCommunitiesStayAtHome Committed Athletes Shy LeBeau, Champion Boxer, Navajo/Sioux Lauren Schad, Professional Volleyball, Cheyenne River Sioux Temryss Lane, Former Professional Soccer and TV analyst, Lummi Nation Lindy Waters III, OSU Basketball, Kiowa/Cherokee Jacoby Ellsbury, professional baseball & world series champion, CRIT/Navajo Lyle Thompson, World’s best lacrosse player, Onondaga Nation Jordan Nolan, professional hockey&Stanley Cup Champion, First Nations Canada Gabby Lemieux, professional golfer, Shoshone-Paiute


Carly Bad Heart Bull Named Executive Director of Native Ways Federation, Inc.

Longmont, Colo., March 25, 2020 — Carly Bad Heart Bull (Bdewakantunwan Dakota/Muskogee Creek and a citizen of the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe in South Dakota) was named Executive Director of the Native Ways Federation (NWF), Inc., an organization uniting non-profit organizations to better serve and create awareness of American Indian communities across the United States. She comes to NWF from the Bush Foundation, where she served as the Native Nations Activities Manager working with Indigenous nations and communities since 2014. Her service area encompassed Minnesota, North and South Dakota, and the 23 tribal nations within the region. Carly has a background in law, and prior to joining the Bush Foundation she was an Assistant County Attorney for the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office (Minneapolis, Minnesota) in its child protection division. She also taught the Dakota language to early childhood students in South Minneapolis. She serves as vice chairwoman of the board of a local non-profit and Indigenous farm, Dream of Wild Health, and on the board of Native Americans in Philanthropy. In 2018, Carly was named an “Unsung Hero” of Minnesota by local media outlet City Pages for her instrumental work on reclaiming the Dakota name of Minneapolis’ largest lake (formerly Lake Calhoun) to Bde Maka Ska. In 2019, she was selected by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation as a Community Leadership Network Fellow, a program for leaders across the country working to create transformational change toward a more equitable society for all. Sarah EchoHawk, Chief Executive Officer of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES), said, “Speaking on behalf of the seven founding member organizations of the Native Ways Federation, we are so pleased to have Carly Bad Heart Bull as our new Executive Director. She has excelled at strategic leadership during her tenure at the Bush Foundation and is well-positioned to lead the Native Ways Federation into the future. Carly has a demonstrated track record in initiating and leading change to effectively elevate the visibility of Native communities within the philanthropic sector. During the board’s search process, her integrity, passion, and commitment to Native people was clear. We are excited by her vision for the organization and are looking forward to all that we will accomplish as an organization under her leadership.” Carly, whose legal education focused on civil rights, made the transition from law to philanthropy because, “My legal career exposed me to the systemic issues that our communities face from a different perspective. I was working within a system that wasn’t set up to serve our people but was in fact intentionally set up to disenfranchise us.” Yet her legal education was vital to her work in the non-profit sector. “The experience taught me how to speak a new language—the language of law and how to navigate systems of power. I learned how to be an interpreter of sorts.” Her legal skills and experience enabled her to learn “another system and a new language, again with the goal of better serving my people.” She added, “These experiences taught me that interpretation is important; however, we also need to be moving toward building a common language. Institutional philanthropy is evolving from a transactional to a relational practice. More foundation leaders and staff are becoming interested in building relationships and engaging with the communities they serve.” Throughout Carly’s career spanning from education to law to philanthropy, she says she sought opportunities to build and use her skills and experiences to better serve Native people. She sees her new role at NWF as a natural progression toward that end, using the community problem-solving and relationship-building skills she gained at the Bush Foundation. “As Native people and sovereign nations we have the answers to address the issues our communities face. However, we haven’t always had access to the proper resources to take appropriate action. As a funder, my role has been to build relationships in and with communities, as well as to learn how to effectively translate their needs to leaders in philanthropy. As Executive Director of NWF, I will propel both the Native non-profit sector and philanthropy to best serve Indian Country.” From education, governance, and helping to build a sustainable economy in Indian Country, Carly sees ample opportunities to affect change by empowering and equipping Native communities with the experiences and tools they need to prosper. “I strongly believe that Indigenous wisdom and ways of being are integral to the vitality of our communities and to this planet. We were all born as whole beings, gifted with numerous strengths and skillsets to contribute to this world. Our experiences and opportunities shape how effectively we can make these contributions. Philanthropy can play an important role in supporting our communities to develop and nurture our individual and collective strengths in ways that will lead to a better future for us all,” she said. Carly holds a Juris Doctorate degree cum laude from the University of Minnesota Law School, a Bachelor of Arts degree summa cum laude from the University of Minnesota, and an Associate of Arts degree from Minneapolis Community and Technical College. Carly lives in Minneapolis with her husband Jay and their young son Quill. About the Native Ways Federation – Native Ways Federation, Inc.’s (NWF) mission is three-fold: (1) To strengthen the circle of giving by uniting Native organizations to raise awareness and needed funds for the communities we serve; (2) To better serve Native communities by becoming more effective Native nonprofit organizations; and (3) To ensure that non-profit organizations working on behalf of Native communities observe the highest levels of ethical standards and fiscal responsibility. NWF is unique in that it is the only federation in the country directly serving Native nonprofits that assist Native peoples and communities in Indian country. NWF is based on the idea that the challenges facing Indian Country demand that nonprofits serving this population hold themselves accountable to the highest standards. For more information about the Native Ways Federation, please visit http://www.nativeways.org/ Photo: Carly Bad Bull Heart, Executive Director, Native Ways Federation, Inc. ___________________________________________

Airport Restaurateurs, Retailers and Small/Minority Businesses Urge Airports and Congress to Provide Financial Relief Industry Experiencing Unprecedented Business Impact

AMAC and ARRA logos WASHINGTON, DC (March 18, 2020) – The Airport Restaurant & Retail Association (ARRA) and Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) urged airports and Congress to quickly pass financial relief for airport restaurateurs and retailers given the unprecedented business impact caused by the spread of the Coronavirus and resultant COVID-19 pandemic. Members of both organizations, which include restaurants, gift shops and retail stores, have been seriously impacted given the rapid decline in airline bookings and passenger counts which are falling at unprecedented rates. Further, several state and municipalities are closing restaurants, including at airports, to help contain the spread of COVID-19. All stakeholders in the industry—airlines, airports, airport retailers and restaurateurs, and other related companies—are financially suffering. The associations represent a $10 billion industry made up of firms of varying sizes, including many small and local businesses which contribute $2.5 billion to airport revenue streams. Together these businesses employ more than 125,000 workers in U.S. airports. The restaurants and retail shops are a vital part of the airline passenger’s travel experience, and a major revenue source on which airports depend for their operations, development and bond financing. John Clark, Chair of AMAC commented, “Our members are suffering tremendous sales losses exceeding 50% and in some cases as high as 90%. The industry is facing a major financial crisis. Many businesses, including those classified as small and/or disadvantaged, may not be able to continue operations.” Restaurateurs and retailers in the aviation sector are contracted by airports, airlines and third-party developers to provide passengers a full range of food, beverage and retail services. Pat Murray, Chair of the ARRA explained, “our members’ ability to retain and pay employees, as well as pay rents to airports, has been seriously jeopardized. Some of our members will likely be unable to meet our debt obligations and will be forced out of business if quick action is not taken to provide relief.” The two associations urged airports to engage with their members quickly and adopt mitigating actions to save the businesses: • Waive rent, other fees and the imposition of penalties for at least six (6) months with the opportunity to extend depending on the extent and impact of the crisis. • Suspend and defer concessionaires’ capital investment requirements. • Provide operational flexibility including, but not limited to adjustments to operating hours, locations and menus/product selections as well as selective temporary closing of stores and restaurants in order to better align with passenger volumes and flows and reduce the impact on employees. ARRA and AMAC strongly support the airports’ request for emergency financial assistance and flexibility to help sustain operations, preserve jobs and bonds, including assistance and flexibility for concessionaires during this critical time. ARRA and AMAC urged Congress and the Administration to also provide financial relief and assistance to airport concessionaires to ensure business continuity, secure loans and make debt service payments. Specific measures ARRA and AMAC urge Congress and the Administration to act upon are: • Provide grants and low-interest or interest-free loans to concessionaires to allow concessionaires to cover operating expenses. • Provide loan guarantees to concessionaires to assure their ability to continue making debt service payments and secure loans for their ongoing capital investment requirements. About Airport Restaurant & Retail Association The Association’s mission is to work collaboratively with aviation-industry trade associations and the airport community on matters of policy decision-making with a collective impact on restaurant/retail members. As members of the airport communities we serve, ARRA members have an expertise and understanding of best practices in the complex aviation restaurant and retail operational environment. Our knowledge can ultimately deliver powerful solutions of benefit to our airport partners. About the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is the only national, non-profit trade association dedicated to advance the full participation of minorities and women in employment and contracting opportunities throughout the aviation and aerospace industries. Since 1984, AMAC has been at the forefront of nearly every national policy initiative impacting the participation of disadvantaged businesses in airport contracting. AMAC works consistently with Congress, the Federal government, aviation trade associations and others as a resource for information, education and guidance on business and employment matters. For more information, visit amac-org.com.

 

Health Care HR Week 2020 Sponsored by ASHHRA

Health Care Human Resources Week will be observed March 16-20, 2020. It is designated to recognize human resources professionals in health care organizations across the nation for their important role across the continuum of care. For more information visit ashhra.org/HCHRWeek.

2020 Marks the 13ᵗʰ Anniversary of the Women Presidents’ Organization 50 Fastest Growing Women-Owned/Led Companies™ Sponsored by American Express

50 Fastest Growing Women-Owned/Led Companiesᵀᴹ Deadline Extended to March 1, 2020!

 

To be eligible, companies must be: • Privately owned • Women-owned/led • The business must have generated at least $500,000 (USD) in 2015 revenue (and every subsequent year) • Revenues must be converted to USD Applicants are not required to be WPO members. International businesses are encouraged to apply.

Click HERE to apply!

EBCI represents at AISES Annual Conference

MILWAUKEE, Wisc. – The recent 42nd American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) Annual Conference in Milwaukee, Wisc. included the following representatives from the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI): Yona Wade, Tracy Monteith, and Katherine Jacobs and representation from the New Kituwah Academy, Jessica Metz. The AISES National Conference has become the premier event for Native American Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) professionals and students and attracts over 2,000 attendees from across the country. During the Annual Conference, the Winds of Change magazine featured the EBCI on their annual list of “25 Native STEM Enterprises To Watch” for the work they are doing to support cultural preservation, language revitalization, and the contributions they continue to make toward programs supporting STEM within the EBCI community. Principal Chief Richard G. Sneed makes one sentiment clear, “We are proud of all our STEM-related employees.” In a world where technology continues to expand connections to ancestors, traditions and ceremonies need to stand stronger than ever, and the EBCI is bringing STEM technology to that challenge according to Sneed, “Preserving our culture and traditions is paramount to the future success of our Tribe.” New Kituwah Academy Science teacher, Jessica Metz, received the distinguished honor of becoming a lifelong member known as Sequoyah Fellows. AISES Sequoyah Fellows are recognized for their commitment to “mission in STEM and to the American Indian community.”

AISES event
Shown at the recent AISES National Conference in Milwaukee, Wisc. are, left to right, Katherine Jacobs, an EBCI tribal member who serves as the Region 3 Representative for the AISES; Yona Wade, an EBCI tribal member who received the AISES Indigenous Excellence Award; and Alicia Mitchell, a Cherokee Nation citizen, who is the newly positioned senior development officer for AISES. (Photo courtesy of AISES)

Alicia Mitchell, a Cherokee Nation citizen, who is the newly positioned senior development officer for AISES, states, “Jessica’s passion for the future of the EBCI students through her instruction is astounding, she continues to set the bar and is a role model for other tribal nations as her students are producing science projects in the Cherokee Language. It was truly a privilege and honor to gift her with a Sequoyah medal.” Katherine Jacobs, an EBCI tribal member and the daughter of Brad Jacobs and Mitchell, has been elected to serve as the Region 3 Representative for the AISES. She is currently studying finance at Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz. and will be graduating May 11. This appointment gives Jacobs the opportunity to be an ambassador for the EBCI and collaborate with other native students on a national level. Jacobs attended as the AISES Region 3 Representative saying, “As the Region 3 Student Representative, it is my duty to lead the planning and execution of the regional conference, notify each chapter of crucial information and serve as a liaison for the chapters and Board of Directors. The AISES community is a true family network that provides countless opportunities and support to indigenous people in STEM fields. I aspire to use my networks from AISES to better serve the EBCI community while stimulating our youth to do the same with the aid of education and organizations such as AISES.” The Conference provided social and professional networking, mentoring, research, and nationally recognized speakers. It also offers thought-provoking discussions on important current STEM issues such as diversity and inclusion in STEM related fields, as well as excellent career resources and traditional cultural activities. During the Traditional Honors Banquet, the EBCI was named as the recipient of the Tribal Partner Service Award for their gracious contributions and financially investing in the 2019 AISES Leadership Summit. Mitchell includes, “The EBCI community really came through on this event providing support, professional tribal members conducting leadership sessions and being incredible hosts to our guests.” The inaugural Indigenous Excellence Award that acknowledges individuals who have done substantial work to advance program and opportunities for Indigenous students and professionals in STEM education and careers was awarded to Yona Wade, an EBCI tribal member who has dedicated 10 years to the development of native youth and supporting the educators at Cherokee Central Schools. “It is an absolute pleasure to serve my Cherokee people,” said Wade. “I have yet to have a day where I didn’t want to go to work. Passion is what drives me.Passion for my work and passion for my people.” As Mitchell has transitioned into the role of a staff member for AISES, her prior service did not go unrecognized at the Traditional Honors Banquet. Her years of service and contributions of supporting STEM across Indian Country and within the EBCI community was instrumental in the development of the EBCI being one of the first two tribal chapters, the placement of three EBCI student representatives, and bringing culturally based curriculum programming into the Cherokee Central School system through grants funded by the Cherokee Preservation Foundation. She is dedicated to this work and feels that her position at AISES allows her to pursue many of her passions including; working for Native people, promoting education, enhancing the tribal workforce, supporting economic development, promoting tribal sovereignty, and increasing diversity in organizations and institutions throughout North America. The collaboration between the EBCI students and AISES strengthens as they received a grant for a project called, Strengthening Computer Science Curriculum for CCS, from the Cherokee Preservation Foundation. This funding provided students and faculty from Cherokee High School the opportunity to attend the 42nd Annual Conference. Cherokee Central Schools’ staff members, Scott Freeman, Robert Rosener, Ronda Denton, Layno Carla attended along with the following students: Howie Wallace, Brandon Wolfe, Dorian Reed, Toby Johns, Caedance Smith, Phoebe Rattler, Jaden Armachain, and Tehya Littlejohn. The students participated in the interactive STEM activities while the faculty attended training sessions. Attendance to the AISES Annual Conference was made possible through funding from the Cherokee Preservation Foundation and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Nominations are currently being accepted for all AISES Professional of the Year Awards who will be honored at the 2020 AISES National Conference on Oct. 15-17 in Spokane, Wash. Completed online nomination packets are due May 15 at 11:59 p.m. MDT. Incomplete nomination packets will not be accepted. For more information see: https://forms.aises.org/2020-poy Want to know more about the AISES professional awards program? Contact Kellie Jewett-Fernandezkjfernandez@aises.org or (720) 758-9679. – Alicia Mitchell, AISES senior development officer

Lumina Foundation Grants the American Indian College Fund $650K to Inform College Affordability, Tribal College Credentialing and Sustainability

To better understand the factors limiting Native Americans’ access and success in higher education, Lumina Foundation has granted the American Indian College Fund $650,000 for a two-part, 30-month project. The first part will determine how affordability of higher education factors into college degree attainment for Native students and how affordability practices impact the long-term sustainability of tribal colleges and universities. The second part will frame how tribal colleges and universities determine high quality credentials and implement teaching and learning practices that contribute to attainment. Currently research identifies affordability as a central cause of college student attrition, however, no research to date has demonstrated the impact of college affordability on the low rates of American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) student college completion. Tribal colleges and universities (TCUs), tribally chartered higher education institutions located on or near Indian reservations, enroll 11% of AIAN students (approximately 15,000) seeking a college degree. The American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) will research whether and how access, affordability, and the rising cost of attending college, coupled with institutional structural challenges and high rates of poverty in American Indian and Alaska Native communities (26.8% compared to 14.6% of the overall population), influence the completion rates of AIAN students. The College Fund will also research how TCUs’ absorption of the cost of education to ensure AIAN student access impacts their sustainability. The research will be conducted in collaboration with the National Native Scholarship Providers Working Group (NNSPWG), comprised of the College Fund and three national Native scholarship-providing organizations: the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES), the American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC), the Indigenous Education Incorporated (IEI), and the College Fund. The collaboration will provide the College Fund access to a large, representative sample of AIAN college students attending both tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) and predominantly white two- and four-year institutions to examine college affordability for AIAN of both TCU and mainstream AIAN college students, graduates, and students who did not complete college. To understand better how TCUs develop credentialed programs and how these credentials impact student success while influencing their sustainability as higher education institutions, the College Fund will also survey a sample of TCUs while engaging in detailed implementation with five TCUs to examine how they create credential programs and determine program success and outcomes. Specifically, this aspect of the project will explore how TCUs utilize state longitudinal data systems to determine the value of their programs; whether TCUs engage state economic forecasting studies to inform credential offerings; how TCUs are involved in their tribal governments’ economic development processes to ensure correct credentials for future tribal employment; and how TCUs measure if their credential offerings are meeting the needs of students (future, current and former), local/state employers, tribal and state policies, and their own institutions. This research is meant to further Lumina’s goal of 60% of Americans holding degrees, certificates, or other high-quality post-secondary credentials by the year 2025 by raising the college completion rates of AIAN students. In addition, this research will assist Lumina’s efforts in achieving the goal by providing necessary evidence of the barriers that hinder AIAN completion so that they may be removed, while ensuring AIAN students are on a guided academic pathway leading to a high-quality credential; robust institutional data tracks the progress of AIAN students along their education path in real time and identifies problems they face in meeting learning goals; and targeted academic, social, and financial supports get students back and track and keep them on a path to academic completion. The College Fund will produce and publish resulting reports from the work. About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org. About Lumina Foundation—Lumina Foundation is an independent, private foundation in Indianapolis that is committed to making opportunities for learning beyond high school available to all. Lumina envisions a system that is easy to navigate, delivers fair results, and meets the nation’s need for talent through a broad range of credentials. The foundation’s goal is to prepare people for informed citizenship and for success in a global economy.

American Indian College Fund Promotes Emily White Hat to Vice President, Programs

Denver, Colo., September 24, 2019 — The American Indian College Fund has promoted Emily R. White Hat, J.D. to the position of Vice President, Programs. In her role as Vice President White Hat will support tribal colleges and universities to develop and implement projects and assists in capacity building to strengthen educational opportunities for Native students. White Hat, who is a citizen of the Sicangu Lakota from the Aske Gluwipi Tiospaye and whose Lakota name is Nape Waste Win or “Good Hand Woman,” was born in Rosebud and grew up in St. Francis, South Dakota. White Hat’s experience as a former firefighter, emergency medical Emily White Hattechnician, policy researcher, evaluator, and legal background have been vital to her work in program development and implementation, strategic planning, national outreach, qualitative research, writing, curriculum implementation, and evaluation with tribal nations and colleges using a capacity-building approach. She earned a J.D. and natural resources law certificate from the University of New Mexico School of Law. She also earned a bachelor’s degree in forestry with a concentration in fire science and a minor in rangeland ecology from Colorado State University, and an associate of arts degree in Lakota history and culture from Sinte Gleska University, a tribal university located on her home reservation. In 2015, Emily was recognized by the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development as one of the “Native American 40 Under 40” award recipients. Emily currently serves as a board member for the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation in Porcupine, South Dakota, a Lakota organization focused on creating systemic change through regenerative community development. About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided 5,896 scholarships last year totaling $7.65 million to American Indian students, with more than 131,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $200 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit collegefund.org.

AISES Joins the US Census 2020 Urban Indian Leadership Circle in the State of Colorado

by Emerald Craig Toya Census The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) began in 1977 with a vision for the next seven generations of Native people to be successful, respected, influential, and contributing members of our vast and ever-changing global community. The success of Native people is not solely represented by one organization, group, or society, but through the support of each other, we see that success. One partnership AISES will be profoundly engaging over the next year is with representatives from the State of Colorado and the U.S. Census 2020 because the Decennial Census is happening in April 2020. The success of the U.S. Census can mean many things for Indian country in addition to population counts. The U.S. Census data influences how congressional seats are allocated, how federal money is distributed for programs like healthcare, housing and education, and where businesses will plan and build new stores. The U.S. Census hosted the first Urban Indian Leadership Circle in Colorado in May 2019 in Denver, Colorado. AISES Director of Marketing and Communication Montoya Whiteman joined close to 30 American Indian and Alaska Native leaders who were certified as tribal partners, and to begin AISES’ role in assisting in outreach and support in reaching a successful 2020 U.S. Census. In the upcoming months, you will start to see U.S. Census 2020 information on the AISES website, in the Winds of Change magazine, Paths to Opportunities newsletters, and more. The Native American Rights Fund along with former Zia Tribal Chairman and Census Tribal Coordinator for 12 states, and 19 tribes, Amadeo Shije, are leading the effort in Indian country for the U.S. Census 2020 with the campaign “Natives Count.” By visiting census.narf.org, you too can join the effort in keeping Indian country successful whether it is being hired for a job such as a census taker, recruiting assistant, office staff, and supervisory staff. Additional resources on how you can volunteer are also available at census.narf.org/. Join the Natives Count effort at census.narf.org and download the flyer to inform your community!

Ying McGuire, CEO and President of NMSDC, Named Member of the SBA’s Council on Underserved Communities by Administrator

The U.S. Small Business Administrator Isabella Casillas Guzman recently named Ying McGuire, CEO and President of the National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC), to serve on the reconvened Council on Underserved Communities (CUC) authorized under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA).

Under newly-appointed Chair, John W. Rogers, Jr, Founder and Co-CEO of Ariel Investments, Ying McGuire, CEO & President, NMSDC and the CUC will work to further the equity priorities of the Biden-Harris Administration by making programmatic and policy recommendations to Administrator Guzman and the SBA to increase access and opportunity across SBA’s programs and initiatives to help level the playing field for all of America’s entrepreneurs. With a focus on serving minority-owned businesses, NMSDC is uniquely positioned to help the SBA in achieving its equity goals and deepening its relationships with Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs).

“It is an honor and a privilege to serve on the SBA’s Council on Underserved Communities. The work that we do will be imperative to improve and strengthen equity among women, veteran-, and minority-owned businesses. We have a once in a lifetime opportunity to rebuild our nation’s economy and close the racial wealth gap – and there is unprecedented momentum from the private and public sectors to eliminate disparities. Because of this, I am excited about our future, and the critical and vital role Small Businesses in underserved communities will play in stimulating economic change,” said Ying McGuire.

“I look forward to relaunching the CUC and working with Chairman John Rogers, Ying McGuire and our other newly-appointed members to support President Biden’s commitment to equity as we build our economy back better,” said Administrator Guzman. “An economic recovery for all of us means that we must do everything we can to help all of our small business and innovative startups emerge from the pandemic stronger and more resilient; and SBA is committed to ensuring our underserved entrepreneurs can access capital, markets, and networks to grow their businesses.”

Drawing from the nation’s most diverse and accomplished small business owners, community leaders, and advocates, Administrator Guzman’s CUC membership represents the voices and interests of America’s diverse small business owners, including those in disadvantaged groups such as women and communities of color. Together, the CUC’s members will work to promote public investment and policy formation to address the barriers facing underserved small businesses.

NMSDC has made a tremendous impact on Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) and has been at the forefront of creating economic opportunities for communities of color for 50 years. NMSDC certified minority-owned businesses generated $400 Billion annual economic output, created, and sustained $2.2 million jobs. We are witnessing a truly remarkable moment in U.S. history, during which private and public enterprises are demonstrating an earnest commitment to inclusivity and diversity in the economy – from education initiatives to workforce development, hiring, contracting, and supporting entrepreneurship.

Read more about Ying McGuire’s fellow CUC members in the SBA’s full release here. Additional information about the CUC can be found at www.sba.gov/CUC.

The SBA will announce CUC additional members in the coming weeks as well as the official meeting dates.

About the Council on Underserved Communities

Initially established in 2010, the Council on Underserved Communities provides advice, ideas, and opinions on SBA programs, services, and issues of interest to small businesses in underserved communities. The 20 member federal advisory committee serves as an essential connection between the SBA and underserved small businesses to work towards creating new and insightful initiatives to spur economic growth, job creation, competitiveness, and sustainability across all communities.

About NMSDC

The National Minority Supplier Development Council Inc.® (NMSDC®) is one of the country’s leading corporate membership organizations with a national office in New York, 23 affiliated councils across the country, and 5 global affiliates. NMSDC is committed to advancing Asian, Black, Hispanic and Native American suppliers in a globalized corporate supply chain by matching its more than 15,000 certified minority-owned businesses to a vast network of corporate members who wish to purchase their products, services and solutions. Our 1,500 national and regional corporate membership includes many of the largest public and privately-owned companies, as well as healthcare companies, colleges and universities.


USPAACC Holds Virtual CelebrASIAN Business Development Conference Part 2

The US Pan Asian American Chamber of Commerce Education Foundation (USPAACC) held its virtual CelebrASIAN Business Development Conference Part 2 as part of its continuing efforts to ensure that Pan Asian American and other diverse businesses grow and thrive in the post-pandemic marketplace.

The first part of CelebrASIAN was held in early June, also using a virtual platform.

The Conference theme, “Synergy Forward,” reflected the collective momentum that is built on trust, togetherness, and partnership.

The 3-day Conference, held November 8 to 10, kicked off with a fireside chat with Wells Fargo CEO and President Charlie Scharf and USPAACC National President & CEO Susan Au Allen. The two discussed a range of issues, including the bank’s diversity and inclusion programs, and how they could help businesses owned by minorities and diverse groups achieve robust growth.

The Synergy Forward Panel was also held, where the 9 leaders representing the country’s top minority and diverse business organizations – Disability:IN; National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC); National Veteran-Owned Business Associations (NaVOBA); The National Veteran Business Development Council (NVBDC); US Black Chambers, Inc. (USBC); United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC); US Pan Asian American Chamber of Commerce Education Foundation (USPAACC); and The Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC) – gathered to discuss key issues on supplier diversity, inclusion, and certification.

The panelists also discussed the value to corporations of partnering with their respective organizations, measuring supplier diversity impact, and creating synergy among the organizations to benefit their unique constituents.

The Conference also held the popular CTO/CIO Forum, Employment Business Resource Group (EBRG) Caucus, Business Express, Business Development Roundtable workshop, “What’s Your Pitch?” national innovation competition, Scholarship Awards, and the Synergy Awards Ceremony.

“We will continue to work hard to further strengthen the synergy created from our shared values and build more invaluable connections: people-to-people, business-to-business, and organization-to-organization,” said USPAACC National President & CEO Susan Au Allen. “Together, we will build a foundation for stronger ties that reflect diversity, inclusion, equality, as well as mutual strategic and business interests.”

On the last day of CelebrASIAN, Allen announced a new USPAACC program, “Supplier Diversity Champions,” that will recognize corporations that show percentage increase in their supplier diversity spend.

This growth-based initiative has been in development for the past couple of years, according to Allen, and it was President Biden’s Executive Order 13985 that has propelled USPAACC to officially announce the program.

For more information about USPAACC and CelebrASIAN Business Development Conference, visit uspaacc.com or celebrasianconference.com


Out to Innovate Career Development Fellowship for Trans, Nonbinary, and Intersex people in STEM

Out to Innovate is offering a second year of the Out to Innovate™ Career Development Fellowship, formerly known as the Ben Barres Fellowship. This $2000-$5000 award supports the professional development of trans, intersex, and non-binary graduate students and post-doctoral researchers in STEM fields.

The December 3, 2021 deadline to apply is quickly approaching.

For more information and to apply please see our website.


American Indian College Fund Launches “This Is Indian Country”

“This Is Indian Country,” a new visibility campaign by the American Indian College Fund, is launching this Native American Heritage Month. The provocative campaign is designed to increase awareness of and conversation about Indigenous people and issues at a time when Native people are still not seen and heard by most Americans.

Last year there was a move towards national acknowledgment of the racial inequity that has been ignored, rewritten, or deleted entirely from history for 400 years. Despite this positive movement, Indigenous people and cultures remain largely out of sight and out of mind. They were undercounted in the U.S. Census, were undertreated during Covid, and continue to be underreported when it comes to murdered and missing Indigenous people.

Yet Indigenous people are Americans and Indigenous culture is American culture.

People live in places with names like Manhattan, Minneapolis, or Chicago; vacation in Montauk, and swim in Malibu. But they can’t out of ignorance—or won’t out of guilt—discuss the people whose lands they occupy. This campaign invites America to not only name check the rivers, lakes, schools, sports teams, and every single cabin at summer camp, but more importantly, understand Native people are here and acknowledge their contributions and their right to be fully visible and have their voices heard.

The American Indian College Fund is launching “This Is Indian Country” to ensure Americans think about Indigenous people every time they talk about them.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “For the narrative of American history to be inclusive and for Indigenous people to have equity in all areas of American life, our neighbors must know that we are here and acknowledge that there is work to be done to build a better and more equal society. The ‘This Is Indian Country’ campaign is intended to be an entry point for all people to greater understanding across the United States. Through this entry point, all people can learn about the rich, diverse cultures of the original people of what is now the United States, and all people can take action to create a more just society. We can be united in our quest for abundant lives for ourselves and for future generations. We believe in education, both for the knowledge that education provides and for the opportunity it presents. We invite all learners to join us in this quest.”

The campaign was created in partnership with advertising agency Wieden Kennedy, a 30+ year partner and collaborator with the College Fund. It soft-launched with a full-page public service announcement in The New York Times print edition on Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

The full campaign is debuting this November, Native American Heritage Month. A website, series of films, social, print, and out-of-home public service announcements are geared to educate, inspire, and acknowledge people nationwide, including the American history, cities and monuments that depended on Indigenous people’s contributions.

  • This Is Indian Country“Indian Country” is an official legal term, noted in numerous Supreme Court opinions and referenced in multiple areas of federal law. The term has been used in treaties, policies, and laws that ordered Indigenous assimilation and erasure. Yet, Indian Country is more than just a legal phrase. Indian Country is in the words we speak on reservations and the stories Native people tell. It is in community. It is empowerment. This term may have been used against Native people, but it has been reclaimed.
  • ManhattanNew York City currently has the largest urban population of Native Americans in the United States. The presence of Indigenous people is evident in what is arguably the world’s greatest city and exists in everything, right down to the history of its Indigenous name.
  • Democracy, Indian CountryThe Iroquois Confederacy was united by the Great Law of Peace in 1722. The Stacked Government model of separate nations united for common good planted the seed for representative democracy in the United States. Yet, it is white leaders that are memorialized with monuments and in history books.

Over the years, for each College Fund campaign, W+K has made use of its relationships with generous media partners and legendary artists to produce sophisticated, cutting-edge advertising on a pro-bono budget. For “This Is Indian Country” W+K tapped television and film director Joe Pytka, who has played a pivotal role in the College Fund’s advertising campaigns for several decades. The film “Democracy, Indian Country” was also co-directed by Indigenous filmmaker Robin Máxkii (Mohican), a Wieden+Kennedy copywriter who worked on the campaign, alongside Wieden+Kennedy art director Samantha Perry.

“We wanted to create something simple, provocative, and above all, empowering, which meant avoiding stereotypes that often exploit Indigenous pain, reduce cultures to background production design, or wield dehumanizing slogans. We are over begging people to acknowledge Natives as people. There is such a power in laying it out boldly with no ambiguity. These are Indigenous words. This is Indigenous truth,” Máxkii and Perry said in a joint statement.

“I love the graphic nature of ‘This Is Indian Country.’ The very short, simple spots are special, too. They make their point in an imaginative and powerful way,” said the campaign’s director and filmmaker, Joe Pytka. “I’m grateful that I have been privileged to be involved in College Fund campaigns over the years, as these issues have become very close to my heart.”

Individuals and organizations can support the movement for Indigenous recognition, representation, and equity by using resources and materials available at ThisIsIndianCountry.com.

About Wieden+Kennedy

Wieden+Kennedy is an independent, privately held global creative company with offices in Amsterdam, Delhi, London, New York City, Portland, São Paulo, Shanghai, and Tokyo. We believe in the power of creativity and influence to solve problems, build brands, change companies, and impact culture, something we have been fortunate to do for almost four decades as partners to some of the world’s best-known companies. www.wk.com

About The American Indian College Fund

The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 32 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $15.5 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students last year. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $259 million in scholarships, program, and community support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Global MindED Honors Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of American Indian College Fund, with a 2021 Inclusive Leader Award

Photo: Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO, American Indian College Fund, winner of GlobalMindED’s 2021 Inclusive Leader Award in non-profits.

American Indian College Fund President and CEO Cheryl Crazy Bull was named a GlobalMindED 2021 Inclusive Leader on November 3 during a virtual awards ceremony. More than 3,000 viewers watched as GlobalMindED’s 2020 Inclusive Leaders named the 2021 winners who serve as role models of Inclusion, Diversity, and Equity (IDE) across 15 major industry sectors. The ceremony highlighted each recipient individually and featured inspiring stories of perseverance and success. This year’s Inclusive Leaders rooted in the Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) communities were selected by GlobalMindED to honor each winner’s pioneering work, peer leadership, and influence among the first-generation college student population GlobalMindED serves.

Upon accepting her award for service in non-profits at the 2021 GlobalMindED Inclusive Leader Awards Ceremony, Cheryl Crazy Bull said, “Justice happens when we are restored to the fullness life that our ancestors lived—rich with the abundance of resources, deep connections to land and family, and profound relations with Creation.”

President Crazy Bull is a citizen of the Sicangu Lakota Nation and has served as President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund since 2012. A lifelong educator and community activist who grew up on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota, she has also been an advocate for Native American self-determination, the very foundation of sovereignty, her whole life. Her work ensures that Native voices, philosophies, and traditions are perpetuated through higher education and visibility, serving as the heart of the important work of building prosperity in Native communities for current and future generations.

Growing up in an extended family rich with cultural influences and relationships, President Crazy Bull attributes her success to her identity as a Lakota woman which was steeped in growing up in her family surrounded by her community. She says her identity is rooted in women having status and influence based on traditional Lakota teachings. While still in high school, President Crazy Bull was given her Lakota name, Wacinyanpi Win, meaning They Depend on Her, because her grandmother observed her taking care of others by making sure their needs were met when the family and community gathered. President Crazy Bull says she has carried the belief in being someone that others can rely on and trust to be supportive throughout her life and believes that being relied on and trusted also means using her voice to speak out and to act. To see her portion of the presentation, visit https://collegefund.org/press-releases/global-minded-honors-cheryl-crazy-bull-president-and-ceo-of-american-indian-college-fund-with-a-2021-inclusive-leader-award/.

About Global MindED— Global MindED is a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to closing the equity gap by creating a capable, diverse talent pipeline through connections to role models, mentors, and internships for least-resourced students, returning adults, First Gen to college, and the inclusive leaders who teach, work, and hire these students. GlobalMindED’s programs include its Inclusive Leader Awards program, a daily newsletter, a strong Summer Start Leadership program for college freshmen, monthly equity events, and an annual conference that will be held June 22-24, 2022, in Denver, Colorado. The Ph.D. Project strives to create a stronger, more diverse workforce. Through its unique model, the nonprofit organization’s Black/African American, Latinx/Hispanic American, and Native American members pursue business PhDs with the intent to become university faculty, teaching and guiding students who aspire to a career in business. El Pomar, a private, general-purpose foundation, accepts applications from 501(c)(3) organizations serving the state of Colorado in the areas of arts and culture, civic and community initiatives, education, health, and human services.

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 32 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $15.5 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2020-21. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $259 million in scholarships, program, and community support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Geo Week Award Ceremony Nominations Accepted Until Dec 1

Geo Week, the single powerhouse event that champions the coming together of geospatial technologies and the built world, is accepting nominations to celebrate excellence in the geospatial market. The 2022 Geo Week Awards Ceremony includes the Lidar Leader Awards, Younger Geospatial Professional Award, and the ASPRS Awards, and honors the achievements of individuals and teams working in the geospatial technology space. The ceremonies will take place during Geo Week in Denver, CO, on February 7, 2022.

“We’re so pleased to recognize personal and group achievement in the geospatial arena. This is something attendees look forward to, and after a two-year hiatus, there’s even more excitement about coming together to celebrate the achievements of these industries,” said Lee Corkhill, Event Director of Geo Week.

Lidar Leader Awards, in its third iteration in partnership with Lidar Magazine, is seeking nominations in five distinct categories:

 

 

  • Outstanding Personal Achievement in LIDAR

 

 

  • Outstanding Enterprise Achievement in LIDAR

 

 

  • Outstanding Team Achievement in LIDAR

 

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  • Outstanding Innovation in LIDAR

 

 

  • Outstanding University Achievement in LIDA

 

 

Spatial Media’s LIDAR Magazine (www.lidarmag.com) will assist the program by encouraging nominations and publishing pre and post-show analysis of finalists. Lidar Magazine’s Managing Editor, Dr. Stewart Walker, will assist a distinguished conference panel that will review and judge submissions on a variety of criteria. Past recipients include Karl Heidemann, Physical Scientist, USGS (Retired), Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) Team, Woolpert, AEye for the AE110 Artificial Perception System, A. Albright—University of Houston, and Hasso Plattner Institute.

Dr. Walker remarked: “We can all learn from what’s worked for the folks that ‘got it right’. We’ll in turn bring their stories and formulas to the magazine, in an attempt to aid readers in their own planning and decision-making.”

The Younger Geospatial Professional Award, in partnership with Lidar News, recognizes the outstanding accomplishments and leadership by an exceptional member of the worldwide, geospatial community 35 years of age or younger. Nominations are accepted in the form of short videos explaining how nominees encourage others to pursue excellence and leadership in their geospatial careers, and an overview of a 10-minute presentation that, if chosen, would be presented at Geo Week. Nominees are given suggested topics, including:

 

 

  • The challenge of advancing your career during a pandemic

 

 

  • Innovative uses of drone lidar

 

 

  • What can one person do about sustainability?

 

 

  • What will be the next geo-technology game changer?

 

 

  • How 3D technology is going to be used in smart cities of the future

 

The Younger Geospatial Professional Award is supported by Lidar News (www.lidarnews.com). Gene Roe, Founder and Managing Editor of Lidar News, remarked, “The Younger Geospatial Professional of the Year Award will provide the winner with an opportunity to demonstrate their leadership and advance their career.” Award recipients receive complimentary conference passes to Geo Week.

Gabrielle Getz of Cesium was the winner of the inaugural Younger Geospatial Professional of the Year Award for 2019

In addition to the Lidar Leader Awards and The Younger Geospatial Award, ASPRS will be recognizing achievement in photogrammetry and remote sensing. Winners will be recognized during a ceremony on Monday, February 7 at Geo Week 2022. Geo Week also features more than 125 speakers across 50 sessions, nearly 100 exhibitors on the show floor, and more than 125 supporting partners.

Learn more about all the awards and submit nominations by December 1 at https://www.geo-week.com/2022-geo-week-awards/.

About Geo Week

Geo Week is part of a network of events and media for the global geospatial and built markets organized by Diversified Communications, a leading organizer of conferences, trade shows, and online media with 15 years in the technology arena. Geo Week, taking place February 6-8, 2022, is the new brand name of previously stand-alone events AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, and reflects the increased integration between the built environment, advanced airborne/terrestrial technologies, and commercial 3D technologies. Powerful partnership events will also take place at Geo Week, including ASPRS (American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing), MAPPS and USIBD (US Institute of Building Documentation). Diversified Communications also produces Geo Week E-Newsletter, SPAR 3D E-Newsletter, AEC Next –E-Newsletter, GeoBusiness Show (UK), Digital Construction Week (UK), Commercial UAV Expo Americas, and Commercial UAV News. For more information, visit www.geo-week.com.


College Fund Hosts 35 Mile Walk Fundraiser for Native American Heritage Month!

November is Native American Heritage Month. There are more than 500 federally recognized Indian tribes in the United States. To help create greater awareness of the remarkable Indigenous histories, cultures, tribes, and how higher education can help these cultures and traditions continue, the American Indian College is launching a nationwide 35 Mile Walk Fundraiser, beginning November 1.

Joining the event is free and is as easy to participate as visiting the College Fund’s Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/collegefund or at the event page at https://www.facebook.com/groups/3156451491301644/ and signing up for the event. Participants will receive a message on Facebook Messenger asking them to confirm an email address and zip code. From there, participants will be admitted to the private 35 Mile Walk Challenge Group, where they can create a fundraiser of their choice to benefit Native students through the American College Fund. Participants can set any monetary goal and raise the money in any way, but everyone must walk and log 35 miles—while sharing their stories and journeys on the group board along the way.

The 35 Mile Walk Fundraiser event ends November 30. So don’t delay–grab your walking stick and sign up today to help Native students and promote visibility of Indigenous people! Sign up here at: The event is a week away and there are already 5,000 people in the community ready to walk, learn, and share! Enter here at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/3156451491301644/

About the American Indian College Fund

The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 32 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $15.5 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2020-21.

Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $259 million in scholarships, program, and community support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance.

For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


News From the National Organization of Gay and Lesbian Scientists and Technical Professionals (NOGLSTP)

• Nominations for our recognition awards are open through Dec. 15, 2021. This is an opportunity to nominate an outstanding LGBTQ+ person in science, engineering, or STEM education and see them recognized for their contributions. https://www.noglstp.org/programs-projects/recognition-awards/

• Applications for our Career Development Research Fellowship are open through Dec. 3, 2021. These fellowships are to support the professional development of trans, intersex, and non-binary graduate students and post-doctoral fellows in STEM fields. https://www.noglstp.org/programs-projects/career-development-fellowship/

• Our scholarship program will open for applications the spring, late April or early May. We have information and press releases posted about the 2020 award winners, and it’s never too early to encourage people for the 2021 scholarships. https://www.noglstp.org/programs-projects/scholarships/


Geo Week Conference Program and Speaker Lineup Announced

Organizers of Geo Week, the single powerhouse event that champions the coming together of geospatial technologies and the built world, have announced an impressive list of conference sessions and speakers for the 2022 event, which will take place February 6-8, 2022, in Denver, CO.  The conference program features more than 125 speakers across 50 sessions with content that explores best practices in 3D capture, working in the built environment, gaining ROI from BIM, defining what’s possible now with lidar, and much more.

The coming together of AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference to form Geo Week reflects the increased integration between the built environment, advanced airborne/terrestrial technologies, and commercial 3D technologies. Partner events taking place in conjunction with Geo Week include ASPRS Annual Conference, MAPPS Winter Meeting, and USIBD Annual Symposium, ensuring the presence of geospatial and built world industry movers and shakers all in one place.

Presenters representing leading organizations including Autodesk, Esri, USGS, The Beck Group, Hexagon Geosystems, GM, Caltrans, Velodyne Lidar, Draper, MLB and NASA will share their expertise on a range of topics. Featured sessions include:

Geo Week will have multiple tracks with content clearly identified as relevant to one or more of the audience groups feeding into Geo Week. The International Lidar Mapping Forum (ILMF) audience has historically been comprised of precision measurement professionals in surveying and mapping who use airborne and terrestrial lidar and related remote sensing technologies. The AEC Next audience has historically been comprised of professionals in architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) that use technologies such as reality capture, automation, AI and XR to bid and manage projects and improve workflows. The SPAR 3D audience has historically been comprised of professionals who use 3D capture, scanning, visualization and modeling technologies across a variety of verticals.

“We’ve witnessed the growing convergence between geospatial and the built world,” said Lee Corkhill, Group Event Director at Diversified Communications, organizer of Geo Week. “We believe the market is ready and eager for this next step of leveraging the confluence of technologies for improved collaboration, increased efficiency, and better outcomes. Much of the conference content and technology being showcased will reflect and support this increasing integration. At the same time, we recognize that individuals and organizations are at differing levels of adoption, and so there will be ample content that is more focused on what were traditional AEC Next, ILMF, and SPAR 3D topics.”

Geo Week will provide education, technology, and resources for professionals in industries including AEC, Asset & Facility Management, Disaster & Emergency Response, Earth Observation & Satellite Applications, Energy & Utilities, Infrastructure & Transportation, Land & Natural Resource Management, Mining & Aggregates, Surveying & Mapping, and Urban Planning & Smart Cities.

More than 80 companies have confirmed booths on the Exhibition Floor with additional companies being confirmed every week and more than 100 associations and media companies are signed on as supporters.

Geo Week takes place February 6-8, 2022, with conference programming and exhibits Sunday, February 6 through Tuesday, February 8. Additional features of the programming are vendor-delivered Product Previews, Exhibition Theaters, workshops, and programming hosted by ASPRS, MAPPS, and USIBD. Visit www.geo-week.com for more information on attending or exhibiting. Register before December 10, 2021 for early bird rates.

About Geo Week

Geo Week is part of a network of events and media for the global geospatial and built markets organized by Diversified Communications, a leading organizer of conferences, trade shows, and online media with 15 years in the technology arena. Geo Week, taking place February 6-8, 2022, is the new brand name of previously stand-alone events AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, and reflects the increased integration between the built environment, advanced airborne/terrestrial technologies, and commercial 3D technologies. Powerful partnership events will also take place at Geo Week, including ASPRS (American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing), MAPPS and USIBD (US Institute of Building Documentation). Diversified Communications also produces Geo Week E-Newsletter, SPAR 3D E-Newsletter, AEC Next –E-Newsletter, GeoBusiness Show (UK), Digital Construction Week (UK), Commercial UAV Expo Americas, and Commercial UAV News. For more information, visit www.geo-week.com.


Top Performers Join Forces with American Indian College Fund for Free Online Indigenous Peoples Day Concert

First-Ever Entertainment Event Celebrating Indigenous Peoples, History, and Cultures to Air October 10 at 6:30 p.m. M.D.T.

Mark your calendars! The American Indian College Fund is hosting a free streaming concert to celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day on Sunday, October 10, 2021, at 6:30 p.m. MDT. The event will feature performances by Native entertainers and artists allied with Native causes from across the nation.

virtual concert poster with entertainers featured

Performances and stories from students and performing artists will include Pink Martini, Portugal. The Man, Martha Redbone, Brooke Simpson, Indigo Girls, Sarah McLachlan, Frank Waln, The Ghost of Paul Revere, Jewel, and Nathaniel Rateliff. Special guests will include Robbie Robertson, Tea Leoni, Mandy Patinkin/Kathryn Grody, and Ziggy Marley. We will also hear from non-Indigenous friends and allies who create shared spaces and opportunities where Native perspectives are welcomed, heard, and valued, to create greater visibility and inclusion for Native people. 

Native students over the years have continually shared that one of the biggest challenges in their education and in their lives is that they do not feel that Native people are seen or heard. The American Indian College Fund believes education is the answer to creating better opportunities for Native people through access to a higher education. But it also knows that the world is not just or kind to Native American graduates. The College Fund is working to create a nation where Native people are visible, their voices are heard, and their contributions are valued.

To see a full list of performers and to register for the free event, please visit https://collegefund.org/events/indigebration/.

About the American Indian College Fund About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 32 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $15.5 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2020-21. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $259 million in scholarships, program, and community support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


The 2021/2022 WiCyS Mentorship Program

WiCyS Mentorship Program

 

We are excited to announce the launch of the 2021/2022 WiCyS Mentorship Program available to WiCyS members! This is a fabulous opportunity for others to be directly infused and engaged w/in the WiCyS organization, making a broader and strong impact on the cybersecurity workforce.

The Mentorship Program is a 12-month structured framework, featuring a new matching platform allowing mentee led matching for a more engaging mentor/mentee experience. Mentees can choose their mentors based on top algorithmic matches. Scheduling sessions, sharing resources, communicating and the curriculum itself will be baked into Together Software, making the 2021/2022 cohort run much more streamlined!

Applications are open now – September 15. Month #1 of the curriculum will begin in November.

Learn more and apply here: wicys.org/initiatives/mentorship/

Please note, you must be a WiCyS Global member to participate in this program. If you are not registered and would like to participate you can become a member here: wicys.org/benefits/


Scholarships awarded to LGBTQ+ students in STEM

Out To Innovate (formerly NOGLSTP) is proud to share these announcements of 21 scholarships awarded to LGBTQ+ students in STEM. Out To Innovate awarded $92,000 to this group of highly deserving students from across the U.S. We are thrilled to work with our sponsors who fund these awards, and we are proud of all of the awarded students.

VIEW THE ANNOUNCEMENTS AND WINNERS HERE!

Learn more about Out To Innovate’s scholarship program at our website: https://www.noglstp.org/programs-projects/scholarships/.


Commercial UAV Expo Americas 2021 will take place live September 7-9, 2021 at The Mirage Las Vegas

Exhibit Floor Nearly Sold Out for Commercial UAV Expo Americas in September 100+ best-in-class UAS solutions providers have booked booths for live event

 

 

PORTLAND, MAINE – USA, July 27, 2021 – Organizers of Commercial UAV Expo Americas, the leading commercial drone trade show and conference in North America, have announced an impressive list of more than 100 exhibitors from around the globe that will be exhibiting at the 2021 event, which will take place live September 7-9, 2021 at The Mirage Las Vegas, Las Vegas NV. “With the exhibit floor nearly sold out, over 250+ media and association partners, and commercial drone professionals signing up to attend every day, it’s clear the industry is ready to reconvene in person at Commercial UAV Expo Americas,” said Lee Corkhill, Group Director at Diversified Communications, organizer of the event. The list of exhibitors who will be showcasing best-in-class UAS is growing daily, and currently includes these organizations and more:

  • AgEagle
  • AirData UAV, Inc
  • Asociación de Profesionales de Drones – APD
  • BRINC Drones
  • Carlson Software
  • C-ASTRAL D.O.O.
  • DJI
  • Drone Amplified
  • Electronics Valley Inc.
  • Exyn Technologies
  • Field of View LLC
  • Flyability SA
  • GeoCue Group
  • HANCOM inSPACE
  • Kinetic Consulting
  • Leica Geosystems Inc.
  • Lightware LiDAR
  • MODUS
  • Nanomotion LTD
  • Pix4D SA
  • Qualcomm Technologies, Inc.
  • RIEGL USA Inc.
  • Robotic Skies
  • Skydio
  • Spaur Group
  • Textron Systems
  • TruWeather Solutions
  • Undefined Technologies
  • vHive Tech Ltd
  • Virtual Surveyor
  • WiBotic Inc.
  • Wingtra
  • xyHt Magazine
  • YellowScan
  • Zephyr Drone Simulator

An Exhibit Hall pass is free for anyone who registers by September 6 and includes Exhibit Hall Theater Programming, Welcome Happy Hour, and the Commercial UAV Expo Networking Reception at no additional charge.  Registration is available here.

Commercial UAV Expo Americas also has a robust conference program with carefully curated topics that address the pressing issues facing commercial drone professionals today, including regulations, ROI, scaling, security, UTM, and much more. Full event information, including workshops, conference programming and networking events can be found at www.expouav.com.

Special features of the 2021 event include live outdoor drone demonstrations, numerous networking functions, industry-specific roundtable discussions, vendor-delivered product previews, and the DRONERESPONDERS Public Safety Summit with two full days of programming for drone operators and program managers across law enforcement, fire, search & rescue, and other emergency services for strategic discussions and workshops surrounding the evolving use of unmanned aircraft systems.

New this year, the AAM Summit, organized in partnership Amsterdam Drone Week, will be a platform for knowledge sharing related to Advanced Air Mobility. About Commercial UAV Expo Americas Commercial UAV Expo Americas, presented by Commercial UAV News, is an international conference and expo exclusively focused on commercial UAS integration and operation covering industries including Construction; Energy & Utilities; Forestry & Agriculture; Infrastructure & Transportation; Mining & Aggregates; Public Safety & Emergency Services; Security; and Surveying & Mapping. It takes place September 7-9, 2021 at The Mirage in Las Vegas. The next edition of its European sister event will take place January 18-20, 2022 at the RAI Amsterdam as part of Amsterdam Drone Week.

For more information, visit  https://www.expouav.com and http://www.expouav.com/europe. Commercial UAV Expo Americas is produced by Diversified Communications’ technology portfolio which also includes Commercial UAV Expo Europe; Commercial UAV News; Geo Week comprised of the International Lidar Mapping Forum, SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference; Geo Week ENewsletter, SPAR 3D ENewsletter, AEC Next ENewsletter.


United Health Foundation Grants $430K to American Indian College Fund for Tribal Scholars Program

Program to Provide Native Students Health Scholarships to Help Grow the Native Health Workforce Denver, Colo., July 27, 2021— The United Health Foundation (UHF) is continuing its support to ensure Native American communities have access to urgently needed health care with a $430,000 grant to provide scholarships for American Indian and Alaska Natives studying in the health and dental care fields. The pandemic and its disproportionate impact on Native communities highlighted the importance of access to culturally responsive health care for underserved populations.

The goal of the United Health Foundation Tribal Scholars Program is to increase the number of employable American Indian and Alaska Native healthcare graduates to work as primary care physicians, nurses, physician assistants, mental and behavioral health specialists, dentists, and pharmacists. Studies have long shown that American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) people experience poorer health status and suffer from greater rates of chronic disease such as diabetes mellitus and heart and respiratory diseases, while also having shorter lifespans than other groups, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health. The America’s Health Rankings Health Disparities Report (visit www.americashealthrankings.org) reveals many additional significant pre-pandemic disparities for Native Americans including food insecurity, severe housing and the rate of depression.

And with the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic, Native communities suffered devastating results. Lack of dental care also leads to health problems in Native communities. Periodontal disease (gum infection) is associated with increased risks for cancer and cardiovascular disease. Studies also show that people with poor oral health and bad teeth are often stigmatized socially and when seeking employment, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. By providing American Indian and Alaska Native students with scholarships to earn degrees in health care, Indigenous graduates can provide people in their communities with personalized, culturally competent care.

Scholarships will be offered to Native students beginning in 2021-22 and are renewable throughout scholars’ academic careers. Scholars will be undergraduate or graduate students, with a preference for undergraduates who are rising sophomores or higher and pursuing degrees in the above-referenced fields at tribal colleges and universities or mainstream colleges and universities. Interested students can learn more and apply at https://collegefund.org/scholarships. “We are honored to continue our partnership with the American Indian College Fund and support its work to create a more diverse health workforce by increasing the number of providers ready to deliver personalized, culturally competent care,” said Tracy Malone, President of the United Health Foundation. “We are proud to help aspiring health care professionals reach their dreams and support their communities.” Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “On behalf of the College Fund and our students, I want to acknowledge that not only do the United Health Foundation Scholarships support students, but this partnership improves the health and well-being of our families.

We have rich cultural traditions that inform how to live healthy lives and it is through the education of our own people that we will be able to bring culturally competent health care to our communities. The United Health Foundation is a leader in addressing health disparities in ways that honor the knowledge of Indigenous people. We are honored to support their leadership.” About the United Health Foundation — Through collaboration with community partners, grants and outreach efforts, the United Health Foundation works to improve our health system, build a diverse and dynamic health workforce, and enhance the well-being of local communities. The United Health Foundation was established by UnitedHealth Group (NYSE: UNH) in 1999 as a not-for-profit, private foundation dedicated to improving health and health care. To date, the United Health Foundation has committed more than $500 million to programs and communities around the world. We invite you to learn more at UnitedHealthFoundation.org. About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years.

The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


USPAACC Holds Virtual CelebrASIAN Conference to Help Small and Diverse Businesses Grow

The 3-day virtual CelebrASIAN Business + Procurement Conference, the country’s largest and longest-running business-to-business (B2B) event designed by Pan Asian American enterprises, was held June 8 to 10 to help minority and diverse enterprises explore business opportunities in the post-pandemic revival.

Now on its 36th year, the national conference was hosted by the US Pan Asian American Chamber of Commerce Education Foundation (USPAACC). The event assembled 66 speakers from Fortune 1000 Corporations, Federal Agencies, Chamber Leadership Alliance Presidents, CEOs, and Founders, and Pan Asian American suppliers and entrepreneurs. It featured 25 programs on business development and diversity and inclusion, with over 1,000 participants.

Title Chair was Amazon, Conference Co-Chairs were Ampcus, Nationwide, Pyramid Consulting, T-Mobile, and Wells Fargo.

This year’s theme, “Together Tomorrow,” celebrated and underscored the power of unity as the U.S. turns the corner from the unprecedented challenges of the past year and looks to a promising future where inclusion and allyship will bring alive more opportunities and a vibrant economic recovery.  

CelebrASIAN kicked off with a strong demonstration of solidarity with USPAACC’s partners from the country’s other three leading minority and diverse chambers of commerce: US Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, National LGBT Chamber of Commerce, and US Black Chambers.

 

Among the highlights of the CelebrASIAN Conference were the 2-part Chief Procurement Officers Forum, How to Do Business with Government Agencies, and a series of supplier business development programs. These sessions featured an esteemed line-up of speakers – subject-matter experts, industry disrupters, federal contract officials, seasoned entrepreneurs, community and market leaders, and the best and brightest business talents – who shared unique insights, invaluable guidance and advice, latest best practices, key trends and outlook, and more to help businesses reset, retool and reinvigorate their businesses.

A virtual Expo was also held throughout the conference that enabled businesses build strategic networks and showcase their products and services.

An in-person event will be held by USPAACC in November of this year.

To learn more about USPAACC and CelebrASIAN, visit www.uspaacc.com and www.celebrasianconference.com


The Annual BDPA Technology and Career Fair – Win Scholarship in the “Design A Mobile App Showcase’!

You will design, pitch and demo the app to a panel of judges for the chance to win a scholarship.

Hi Students,

The National Mobile App showcase is a great opportunity to improve your programming skills in the language of your choice and learn about product development.

Design and build any application you are passionate about and learn how to give a compelling pitch to an audience of companies looking for students like you!

This competition is here for independent, driven students.

We will provide lightweight checkpoints to help you think through your app, troubleshoot, and finish a Minimum Viable Product (MVP) by the end of the summer.

Build your app at your own pace.

Register Here!

During the Annual BDPA Conference on August 12-14, 2021, you will pitch and demo the app to a panel of judges for the chance to win a scholarship upward We’ve got great prizes this year.

1st Place College Scholarship $3,000

2nd Place College Scholarship $2,000

3rd Place College Scholarship $1,250

1st Place High School $1,750

2nd Place High School $1,250

3rd Place High Scholarship $750

Hope to see you there!

Best,

The Mobile App Showcase Team

mobileapps@bdpa.org


American Indian College Fund Awards Four Tribal Colleges with Four-Year Computer Science Initiative Grants

Computer science education provides today’s college students the necessary skills and opportunities to thrive in today’s world. Yet American Indian and Alaska Native peoples are still and have been historically underrepresented in the computer science fields. To remedy that, the American Indian College Fund launched its Tribal College and University Computer Science Initiative to create new and expand existing computer science programs at higher education institutions serving American Indian and Alaska Native students to meet the community and workforce needs of Indigenous communities and to provide career opportunities for Native students in computer science fields.

The four-year initiative will focus on faculty hiring and professional development; developing or enhancing computer science academic programs and curriculum at the TCUs; developing and participating in a community of practice activities; and participating in community engagement, sustained pathways, and/or student support through industry partner relationships.

The College Fund selected the following four applicants to participate in the initiative. The TCUs and their programs include:

• Bay Mills Community College (BMCC), located in Brimley, Michigan. BMCC’s program, Nanda-gikendan Waasimowini (seek to learn computers in Ojibwe), will develop an online Bachelor of Science degree in computer information systems with a computer science track that will be accessible across the country. BMCC will hire one additional full-time instructor to develop courses and two adjunct faculty to meet specific course needs. It will also support its current Computer Information Systems department chair/faculty member to obtain a graduate degree and relevant computer science education and training. BMCC students will receive hands-on experience in programming, project design, technical support, and will work to help BMCC create computer science awareness in the community.

• The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA), located in Santa Fe, New Mexico, will launch its The IAIA Art of Computer Science program. IAIA will create an interdisciplinary computer science environment across degree programs using computer science courses/modules while supporting development of a gaming degree. It will also hire full-time, pro-rata, and adjunct faculty to teach, and contractors to develop computer science curriculum and assist other departments with integration of computer science education across disciplines. To ensure all faculty have proficient computer skills, IAIA will also support professional development for 35 permanent faculty to take basic computer science coursework to integrate computer science concepts and skills into their courses and programs of study. The Institute will implement community engagement projects for students to incorporate computer science education and awareness into their community internships work to help provide their communities with an understanding of the value computers and computer science skills in a culturally relevant way.

• Navajo Technical University (NTU), located in Crownpoint, New Mexico, will launch its CSE@NTU-Computer Science Enhancement at NTU program to enhance current associate degrees in computer science programming by expanding the programs to the Bachelor of Science degree level. NTU will hire one additional full-time computer science faculty member to assist in teaching and developing the program. NTU will also support current computer science faculty and the new hire with professional development opportunities relevant to computer science education and will incorporate speaking opportunities for computer science industry experts and professionals to work with faculty, staff, and students.

• Salish Kootenai College (SKC) in Pablo, Montana will launch its Increasing Computer Science Capacity at Salish Kootenai College program to offer computer science programs through the creation of a one-year certificate of completion in computer programming and to offer enhanced computer science coursework for SKC’s STEM disciplines. SKC will develop a path for the computer programming program’s sustainability through dual-enrollment opportunities for reservation high school students. The college will hire one additional full-time computer science faculty member to support dual-enrollment courses and courses within the proposed one-year certificate program and will support current and new faculty with professional development opportunities in culturally sustaining pedagogy, technical pedagogy, and specialized industry training relevant to computer science education and training. SKC will also host summer coding workshops and develop dual-enrollment computer science courses with at least two reservation high schools to enhance student exposure to computer science education and careers.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “The self-determination of the Tribal people is closely aligned with our ability to adapt and make use of all the tools of modern society. I am reminded that as Native people that we have always valued using the tools created by others to make our lives better. My colleagues at the College Fund and I agree that computer science is one of those tools. Computer science is foundational to so many aspects of life today. Everything from information technology to entertainment to building a picture of the well-being of our communities is tied to our ability to use computer science to our advantage. We are excited that our TCUs will be able to increase their capacity and open doors to more career opportunities.”

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit collegefund.org.


American Indian College Fund Receives Unrestricted Gift from MacKenzie Scott Foundation

The American Indian College Fund, the national non-profit organization serving American Indian and Alaska Native college students and tribal colleges and universities, learned the MacKenzie Scott Foundation, headed by the billionaire novelist and philanthropist of the same name and her husband Dan Jewett selected it to receive an unrestricted gift. The College Fund provides Native American and Alaska Native students with greater access to a higher education and the support to succeed in college and in their careers.

 

The gift could not have come at a better time. The national college attainment gap of Native Americans is already less than half of that of other groups at 15% (compared to 32.1% of all other groups), according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

 

When the pandemic hit, it heightened existing barriers for Indigenous people to access education. Native communities were hit hardest by the virus due to limited access to health care or inadequate health care services; community members with more existing chronic health conditions; and much higher rates of poverty that result in greater rates of food and housing insecurity among Native students, according to the Tribal Colleges and Universities #RealCollege Survey and subsequent College Fund student surveys. When lockdowns shuttered Tribal nations, many colleges and universities transitioned to online classes, leaving many students in remote, rural reservation communities cut off due to lack of affordable technology resources and connectivity. And after Tribal economies based largely in the service industry closed leading to high rates of unemployment, it left many of the more than 50% of College Fund scholars who work full- or part-time and who are the sole family breadwinners without jobs.

 

Any one situation taken alone would be stark, but taken together, they resulted in the steepest national pandemic-related declines in college enrollment among first-time entering Native students in the fall of 2020, according to American Indian Higher Education Consortium data. Freshman enrollment was down 11% overall at TCUs and down 23% nationally at all colleges and universities.

 

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “This gift is timely and pivotal because, in combination with the generosity of our network of current and future supporters, we now have the capacity to grow greater opportunities for American Indian and Alaska Native communities and to create lasting change. MacKenzie Scott and Dan Jewett’s acknowledgement of our work is a testament to the important role of education to transform the lives of our students, their families, and communities.”

 

The College Fund is committed to eliminating the college attainment gap among Indigenous people and ensuring that every American Indian and Alaska Native student that dreams of a higher education can achieve that dream. The College Fund continues to appreciate and rely upon the support of every one of its current and future supporters to meet its goals to transform the lives of Indigenous students, their families, and their communities through a higher education.

 

About the American Indian College Fund: The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. Among Native students that graduate from tribal college graduates, a 2019 Gallup survey shows 74% work in careers in their communities in fields such as health care, education, business, and more. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Geo Week Announces Massive Early Support for 2022 Event

100+ Best-in-class organizations have confirmed their support for the 2022 edition of Geo Week

PORTLAND, MAINE – USA, June 22, 2021 – Organizers of Geo Week, the single powerhouse event that champions the coming together of geospatial technologies and the built world, have announced an impressive list of supporters for the 2022 event, which will take place February 6-8, 2022 in Denver, CO. Geo Week is the joining of AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, along with partner events ASPRS Annual Conference and USIBD Annual Symposium.

More than a hundred associations and media companies have already signed on as supporters of Geo Week 2022. “Industry leaders have clearly cast their votes for Geo Week in 2022,” said Lee Corkhill, Group Director at Diversified Communications, organizer of the event. “100+ media and association supporters have already signed on as Supporting Partners for next year’s event, as Geo Week establishes itself as the powerhouse event serving professionals in the geospatial and built world industries.” Geo Week will also soon be announcing early exhibitors who have already signed up and confirmed booths on the show floor. Current supporters of the 2022 event, including trade media, portals, associations, user groups, government entities, and non-profits, are as follows:

PUBLICATIONS

AEC Magazine

Africa Surveyors

American Surveyor

BIGNieuws

Building Design and Construction

Civil Engineering Surveyor

CODE

Commercial Construction and Renovation

Coordinates Magazine

Develop 3D Magazine

Diversity In STEAM Magazine

Earth Imaging Journal

GEO Informatics

GeoConnexion

Geomatics World

GIM International

GPS World

Hydro International

Informed Infrastructure

LIDAR Magazine

POB

Surveying Group

TwinGeo

Urban Transport Infrastructure Journal

U.S. Veterans Magazine

xyHt

 

PORTALS

AEC Bytes

AEC Café

AEC News

AP Planner

B1M Community

BigDataVendors

CanBim

Clocate

Commercial UAV News

ConstructionLinks

CrowdReviews

Datafloq

Devtownstation

Digital Construction Week Connect

Digitalconstructionnews

DroneIndustryWire

Electronics Valley

Energy Centra

Geo Insight

Geo4Construction

Geofumadas

GeoJobs.biz

Geospatial1

Geospatialnews.net

Geowawesomeness

Geo Week News

GIS Café

GIS Resources

GISuser.com

GoGeomatics

Govevents

GPSDaily

Inertialnavigationsystems.net

IOTEvents

Lidar News

Manufacturing Tomorrow

Mining Engineering

MyDearDrone

NBN Media

Queue

Robotics Tomorrow

Sensorland

Spatial Times

Spatialsource

Startupedia

STEM Education Entrepreneurship

TechEvents.Online

Telco Professionals

WeGetAroundNetwork

World Construction Today

 

ANALYSTS

ABI Research

Flux Trends

Frost & Sullivan

Geospatial World

HAPTIC R & D Consulting

MAPPS

Mind Commerce

Parks Associates

 

ASSOCIATIONS & USER GROUPS

AI Coding Meetup

ASPRS

Canada 5G Council

Chartered ICES

CWTA

Deep Learning Meetup

FLAM 3D

Google Developers East Bay

GUTMA

IPv6 Forum

Open Geo Consortium

Silicon Valley Forum

STACouncil

UAVA

USIBD

VR and AR Association

WITI

Women Who Code

World Geospatial Industry Council

 

COOPERATING EVENTS

GeoIgnite Canada

Geospatial World Forum

Parks Connections

Silicon Valley Women Tech Festival

STAC

WITI Summit

The coming together of AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference to form Geo Week reflects the increased integration between the built environment, advanced airborne/terrestrial technologies, and commercial 3D technologies. Geo Week is at the forefront of this integration, providing education, technology, and resources for professionals in industries including AEC, Asset & Facility Management, Disaster & Emergency Response, Earth Observation & Satellite Applications, Energy & Utilities, Infrastructure & Transportation, Land & Natural Resource Management, Mining & Aggregates, Surveying & Mapping, and Urban Planning/Smart Cities.

According to Corkhill, there will be content that addresses the built environment, advanced airborne/terrestrial technologies, and commercial 3D technologies independently of one another and attendees will have access across all conference sessions. “The event represents a continuum, with individuals and organizations from all corners of industry at differing levels of adoption. Geo Week will support a future vision, in which professionals and organizations that understand the full spectrum of data needs, work processes, software integration, and standards in both geospatial and BIM will be tomorrow’s technology leaders,” said Corkhill.

The event will feature multiple tracks with content clearly identified as relevant to one or more of the audience groups feeding into Geo Week. The International Lidar Mapping Forum (ILMF) audience has historically been comprised of precision measurement professionals in surveying and mapping who use airborne and terrestrial lidar and related remote sensing technologies. The AEC Next audience has historically been comprised of professionals in architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) that use technologies such as reality capture, automation, AI and XR to bid and manage projects and improve workflows. The SPAR 3D audience has historically been comprised of professionals who use 3D capture, scanning, visualization and modeling technologies across a variety of verticals.

Geo Week takes place February 6-8, 2022, with conference programming and exhibits Sunday, February 6 through Tuesday, February 8. Additional features of the programming are vendor-delivered Product Previews, Exhibition Theaters, workshops, and conference programming hosted by ASPRS and USIBD. Visit www.geo-week.com for more information on attending or exhibiting.

About Geo Week

Geo Week is part of a network of events and media for the global geospatial and built markets organized by Diversified Communications, a leading organizer of conferences, trade shows, and online media with 15 years in the technology arena. Geo Week, taking place February 6-8, 2022, is the new brand name of previously stand-alone events AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, and reflects the increased integration between the built environment, advanced airborne/terrestrial technologies, and commercial 3D technologies. Powerful partnership events will also take place at Geo Week, including ASPRS (American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing) and USIBD (US Institute of Building Documentation). Diversified Communications also produces Geo Week E-Newsletter, SPAR 3D E-Newsletter, AEC -ENewsletter, GeoBusiness Show (UK), Digital Construction Week (UK), Commercial UAV Expo Americas, Commercial UAV Europe and Commercial UAV News. For more information, visit www.geo-week.com.

Questions?

Carl Berndtson Global Partnerships CBerndtson@divcom.com

Lora Burns

Geo Week Marketing Manager LBurns@divcom.com


American Indian College Fund Receives Unrestricted Gift from MacKenzie Scott Foundation

The American Indian College Fund, the national non-profit organization serving American Indian and Alaska Native college students and tribal colleges and universities, learned the MacKenzie Scott Foundation, headed by the billionaire novelist and philanthropist of the same name and her husband Dan Jewett selected it to receive an unrestricted gift. The College Fund provides Native American and Alaska Native students with greater access to a higher education and the support to succeed in college and in their careers.

The gift could not have come at a better time. The national college attainment gap of Native Americans is already less than half of that of other groups at 15% (compared to 32.1% of all other groups), according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

When the pandemic hit, it heightened existing barriers for Indigenous people to access education. Native communities were hit hardest by the virus due to limited access to health care or inadequate health care services; community members with more existing chronic health conditions; and much higher rates of poverty that result in greater rates of food and housing insecurity among Native students, according to the Tribal Colleges and Universities #RealCollege Survey and subsequent College Fund student surveys. When lockdowns shuttered Tribal nations, many colleges and universities transitioned to online classes, leaving many students in remote, rural reservation communities cut off due to lack of affordable technology resources and connectivity. And after Tribal economies based largely in the service industry closed leading to high rates of unemployment, it left many of the more than 50% of College Fund scholars who work full- or part-time and who are the sole family breadwinners without jobs.

Any one situation taken alone would be stark, but taken together, they resulted in the steepest national pandemic-related declines in college enrollment among first-time entering Native students in the fall of 2020, according to American Indian Higher Education Consortium data. Freshman enrollment was down 11% overall at TCUs and down 23% nationally at all colleges and universities.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “This gift is timely and pivotal because, in combination with the generosity of our network of current and future supporters, we now have the capacity to grow greater opportunities for American Indian and Alaska Native communities and to create lasting change. MacKenzie Scott and Dan Jewett’s acknowledgement of our work is a testament to the important role of education to transform the lives of our students, their families, and communities.”

The College Fund is committed to eliminating the college attainment gap among Indigenous people and ensuring that every American Indian and Alaska Native student that dreams of a higher education can achieve that dream. The College Fund continues to appreciate and rely upon the support of every one of its current and future supporters to meet its goals to transform the lives of Indigenous students, their families, and their communities through a higher education.

About the American Indian College Fund: The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. Among Native students that graduate from tribal college graduates, a 2019 Gallup survey shows 74% work in careers in their communities in fields such as health care, education, business, and more. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org


NOGLSTP’s Out To Innovate Scholarships

The 2021 Out To Innovate scholarships, supporting LGBTQ+ students in STEM, are now open for applications. Scholarships are available for undergraduate, graduate, and community college transfer students in STEM fields who identify as LGBTQ+. Students enrolled at any accredited U.S. educational institution are eligible to apply.

One application covers 5 scholarships.

In addition to our scholarships that cross STEM disciplines, we are also offering over 12 awards that are directed towards students in biosciences, engineering, or physics.

The application deadline is June 5, 2021, and more information can be found on the scholarship webpage: https://www.noglstp.org/programs-projects/scholarships/.


Commercial UAV Expo Americas Announces 70+ Exhibitors to Date for 2021 Event

Organizers of Commercial UAV Expo Americas, the leading commercial drone trade show and conference in North America, have announced an impressive list of more than 70 exhibitors from around the globe who have already signed on to exhibit at the 2021 event, which will take place September 7-9, 2021 at The Mirage Las Vegas, Las Vegas NV.

Hundreds of industry leading organizations have already committed their support for Commercial UAV Expo Americas 2021.  “With more than half the exhibit floor already sold and over 250+ media and association partners from 6 continents signed on, Commercial UAV Expo Americas is firmly established as the leading event serving professionals integrating and operating commercial sUAS” said Lee Corkhill, Group Director at Diversified Communications, organizer of the event. “After a year unlike any other, the industry is excited to reconvene in person to connect, learn, and drive the industry forward.”

 

 

The list of exhibitors who will be showcasing best-in-class UAS is growing daily, and currently includes these organizations and more:
Aerial Response Solutions
Airlogix
Asociación de Profesionales de Drones
C-Astral Aerospace
Capitol Technology University
Carlson Software
DAT/EM Systems International
DroneTV
Electronics Valley
Fortress UAV
Frontier Precision
GeoCue Group Inc.
Hesai Technology Co., Ltd.
Hollywood Drones
Intel GEOSPATIAL
Kittyhawk
Korea Institute of Aviation Safety Technology
Phoenix LiDAR Systems
RIEGL USA
Robotic Skies
Sundance Media Group
Swift Tactical Systems
Terrasolid Ltd
Unmanned Systems Technology
VANTIS
VRMesh
Wavelabs Ltd.
Wingtra

The last live edition of Commercial UAV Expo Americas in 2019 drew in 3,100 attendees, 200+ exhibitors, and 200+ presenters from over 50 countries. The full list of supporters and attendees who took part in the event can be found here. Special features of the 2021 event include live outdoor drone demonstrations, numerous networking functions, industry-specific roundtable discussions, vendor-delivered product previews, and the DRONERESPONDERS Public Safety Summit with two full days of programming for drone operators and program managers across law enforcement, fire, search & rescue, and other emergency services for strategic discussions and workshops surrounding the evolving use of unmanned aircraft systems. New this year, the UAM Summit, organized by Amsterdam Drone Week, will be a platform for knowledge-sharing about urban air mobility solutions.

Full event information, including workshops, conference programming, networking events and more will be available soon. Registration for the 2021 event will open in June – stay in the know

About Commercial UAV Expo Americas
Commercial UAV Expo Americas, presented by Commercial UAV News, is an international conference and expo exclusively focused on commercial UAS integration and operation covering industries including Construction; Energy & Utilities; Forestry & Agriculture; Infrastructure & Transportation; Mining & Aggregates; Public Safety & Emergency Services; Security; and Surveying & Mapping. It takes place September 7-9, 2021 at The Mirage in Las Vegas. The next edition of its European sister event will take place December 7-9, 2021 at the RAI Amsterdam as part of Amsterdam Drone Week. For more information, visit www.expouav.com and www.expouav.com/europe.


American Indian College Fund Introduces “Think Indian Book Club”

“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. A man who never reads lives only one.”—George R.R. Martin

 

Several years ago, American Indian College Fund staff members organized a “Think Indian” book club to read the literary works by Native authors—many of whom have attended, graduated from, or taught at tribal colleges and universities.

 

This year we realized we could elevate Native writers’ voices by sharing their works with the greater public. In addition to providing recommendations for some great reads, we also saw this as an opportunity to introduce people to cultures and peoples they might not otherwise meet.

 

Reading literary fiction is proven to be more than mere entertainment. Studies show that reading literary fiction increases empathy, encourages understanding of other people, and increases critical thinking skills (business books and commercial fiction do not have the same effect, by the way).

 

We created the Think Indian Book Club blog to share our Think Indian Book Club book selections and reviews. We will review each forthcoming book club selection and share it with you, the reader (along with indigenous booksellers’ information so that you can patronize Native-owned businesses).

 

We have also created a list of past Think Indian Book Club selections to get you started on your summer reading. Enjoy, and if you have a moment, drop us a line at info@collegefund.org and let us know how you enjoyed our recommendations.

 

Book Review: Moon of the Crusted Snow

https://collegefund.org/blog/book-review-moon-of-the-crusted-snow/

 

List of Past Think Indian Book Club Selections

https://collegefund.org/blog/read-the-think-indian-book-club-past-selections/


Remembering Jimmy “Jim” Curtis Shorty

Jimmy “Jim” Curtis Shorty
Jimmy Curtis Shorty. Photo Courtesy of the Navajo Times

The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) is mourning the loss of Jimmy “Jim” Curtis Shorty, one of the original co-founders of AISES and a former member of the Board of Directors. Jim dedicated his life, and his legal and engineering career, to his people, the Navajo Nation.

For six years, Jim directed the Native American Program in the College of Engineering (NAPCOE) at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.

NAPCOE is likely the first university-level program in the United States for Native students (some 30 at the time). Carol Metcalf-Gardipe, another instrumental AISES co-founder, was the first NAPCOE director, with Jim following in the mid-1970s. NAPCOE had a role in the early genesis of AISES, before there was any discussion about the formation of an organization for Native people in STEM.

The story of AISES began when Al Qöyawayma read a short article in the Arizona Republic about NAPCOE, which brought him into contact with Carol and Jim, and ultimately A.T. Anderson and George Thomas.

What soon followed was the formation of the American Indian Engineering Council, where Jim helped write the bylaws and formalize legal aspects of creating what would eventually become AISES as we know it today.

My remembrance of Jimmy C. Shorty by Dr. Bob Whitman

I first met Jimmy C. Shorty (Jim Shorty) when I returned to school for the fall semester in 1976. He was the new director of the Native American Program in the College of Engineering (NAPCOE) at the University of New Mexico (UNM). NAPCOE was the first program of its kind in an engineering school which was established solely to recruit and retain American Indian students in engineering. I worked for NAPCOE as a tutor and recruiter. He was my new boss but also became a good friend. He shared his experiences working in the Navajo Tribal government and in establishing AISES.

When I graduated with my undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from UNM, Jim slipped me a brochure of an organization called the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. He had informed me that it was a new organization and that I could join it with a one-time membership fee, and I would be a member for life. I was very skeptical of this organization, so I did not act on it for over a year.

In the summer of 1978, Jim submitted a request to my employer, IBM for my release time to teach basic mathematics to students in the NAPCOE summer institute. IBM granted the request and I returned to the University of New Mexico to teach a group of 28 American Indian students. This four-week summer institute set the basis for students to become familiar with the demands of being in engineering school.

When I was elected to the AISES board of directors in 1983, Jim provided counsel and advice. When I was elected Chair of the Board of Directors of AISES, I relied on him to interpret the bylaws of the organization. These bylaws were largely drafted by him.

Over the years, I would occasionally meet with Jim, usually at AISES conferences. He had many stories about his professional experiences. I feel that these stories set the basis for my mentoring. It was professional development that went well beyond the technical education I received as an engineering student.

When I joined the electrical and computer engineering faculty at UNM in 1996, my first course I taught there was video recorded. Jim, who worked for Sandia National Labs, would coordinate the receiving of my video-recorded lectures for distribution to Sandia employees taking my course.

Jim was one of only two American Indian bosses I had in my career and one of the few Navajo mentors in my professional development. He was a good friend who shared many Navajo jokes.

An Amazing Life Story

The third eldest of six siblings, Jim grew up in a humble environment and worked herding sheep in the gulches of Coyote Canyon, New Mexico. After graduating from St. Michael’s High School in 1957, he earned his BS in geology from St. Joseph’s College in 1961.

After being honorably discharged by the U.S. Army, Jim attended the University of New Mexico where he received his PhD in law and worked as a geologist for the Navajo Nation Department of Water Resources. He was well-known within the Navajo Tribe, where he was a fluent speaker and served as an assistant to the president.

While employed at Sandia National Laboratories, he worked as an educator and supervised various minority outreach efforts from 1983 to 2007 before retiring.

Jimmy is survived by his wife of 54 years, Patricia Shorty, sons Richard and Patrick Shorty, two granddaughters, and four great-grandchildren.

Jimmy was born April 15, 1937, in Rehoboth, N.M.; he peacefully passed away April 17, 2021, surrounded by his family.

He believed strongly in the AISES mission who was generous with his knowledge, teachings, and who inspired thousands of students through his work. Jimmy will be honored during the memorial portion of the 2021 AISES National Conference in Phoenix in September.


AISES Named “2021 Top-Rated Nonprofit” by GreatNonprofits

AISES has been named a “2021 Top-Rated Nonprofit” by GreatNonprofits, the leading website for community recommendations of charities and nonprofits.

“We are honored to be named a 2021 Top-Rated Nonprofit,” said Sarah EchoHawk, AISES CEO. “We are proud of our accomplishments this year, including hosting the first virtual Leadership Summit, welcoming the University of Wyoming Native American Program as an AISES college chapter, and launching the Native Financial Cents website.” 

The Top-Rated Nonprofit Award is based on the rating and number of reviews that AISES received from volunteers, donors, and supporters. “AISES is my family. These are my people. There are very few places where an American Indian Nerd feels welcome,” wrote one reviewer.

 

“AISES is a great example of a nonprofit making a real difference in their community,” said Perla Ni, CEO of GreatNonprofits, “Their award is well-deserved recognition not only of their work, but the tremendous support they receive, as shown by the many outstanding reviews they have received from people who have direct experience working with AISES.”

 

GreatNonprofits is the largest donation website for nonprofits and where people share stories about their personal experiences on more than 1.6 million charities and nonprofits. The GreatNonprofits Top-Rated Awards are the only awards for nonprofits determined by those who have direct experience with the charities – as donors, volunteers, and recipients of aid.

The complete list of 2021 Top Rated Nonprofits can be found at: https://greatnonprofits.org/awards/browse/Campaign:Year2021/Issue:All/Page:1

 


Out To Innovate scholarships for LGBTQ STEM students

The 2021 Out To Innovate scholarships, supporting LGBTQ+ students in STEM, are now open for applications. Scholarships are available for undergraduate, graduate, and community college transfer students in STEM fields who identify as LGBTQ+. Students enrolled at any accredited U.S. educational institution are eligible to apply. One application covers 5 scholarships.

In addition to our scholarships that cross STEM disciplines, we are also offering over 12 awards that are directed towards students in biosciences, engineering, or physics. 

The application deadline is June 5, 2021, and more information can be found on the scholarship webpage: https://www.noglstp.org/programs-projects/scholarships/ .


MBDA INVISION TOUR

For details visit, https://mbdainvision.com


Commercial UAV Expo Americas Announces Massive Early Support for 2021 Event

Organizers of the annual Commercial UAV Expo Americas, the leading commercial drone trade show and conference in North America, have announced an impressive list of more than 225 supporters from six continents for the 2021 event, which will take place September 7-9, 2021 at The Mirage Las Vegas, Las Vegas NV.

Go

Hundreds of associations and media companies have already signed on as supporters of Commercial UAV Expo Americas 2021. “Industry leaders have clearly cast their votes for Commercial UAV Expo Americas in 2021,” said Lee Corkhill, Group Director at Diversified Communications, organizer of the event. “225+ media and association supporters have signed on as Supporting Partners for this year’s event, as Commercial UAV Expo Americas has firmly established itself as the leading event to bring the industry safely back together and serve professionals integrating and operating commercial UAS.”

Current supporters of the 2021 event, including trade media, portals, associations, user groups, government entities, and non-profits, are as follows:

PUBLICATIONS

Aerospace & Defense Review

Africa Surveyors

American Journal Of Transportation

American Surveyor

ARB Climber

Armor & Mobility

Asia Pacific Fire

Aviation Business ME

Aviation Update

BIGNieuws

Canadian Mining Journal

China Public Security Journal

CIO Applications

CIO Review

Civil Engineering Surveyor

CODE

Commercial Drone Professional

Construction Equipment

COTS Journal

Crisis Response Journal

Diversity In STEAM Magazine

Drones Monthly

Drones World Magazine

GEO Informatics

GeoConnexion

Geomatics World

Geospatial World

GIM International

Global Security Magazine

GPS World

Gulf Fire

Hydro International

Inspectioneering

International Fire Protection

International Firefighter

LIDAR Magazine

Mining Engineering

Naval Power

Police Aviation News

Roads and Bridges

RTC Magazine

Security & Border Protection

Stormwater Solutions

Technical Rescue

Tower Times

Traffic & Transit

TwinGeo

UASMagazine

UK Fire

Unmanned Magazine

Unmanned Systems Technology

Urban Transport Infrastructure Journal

US Veterans Magazine

Videomaker

Wilderness SAR

Wireless Dealer

World Airnews

xyHt

 

PORTALS

Agritech Tomorrow

AEC Café

Aerospace Technology

Agfunder

Airborne Response

Airplane Geeks

AP Planner

Autonomy Paris

BigDataVendors

ChiefIT

Clocate

Commercial UAV News

ConstructionLinks

CrowdReviews

Demunseed Channel

DevTownStation

Digitalconstructionnews.net

Drastic News

Drone Radio Show

Drone TV

DroneGuru

DroneIndustryWire

DroneJudge

DroneLife

DroneNodes

DronePilotsNL

DroneReviewsandNews

DronesBuy

Dronewatch.EU

Dronewatch.NL

Dronin’ On

Electronics Valley

Energy Central

EnergyDaily

Geo4Construction

Geofumadas

GeoJobs.biz

Geospatialnews.net

Geowawesomeness

GIS Café

GIS Resources

GISuser.com

Global Fire Events

GoGeomatics

Govevents

GPSDaily

Hollywood Drones

Inertialnavigationsystems.net

Inflight USA

InfoDrone.ES

InsideTowers

JobsForDrones.com

LidarSurvey

Lidar News

MyDearDrone

MySecurityMedia

NBN Media

OilGasDaily

Quadcopter Addiction

Queue

RigZone

RoboDaily

Robotics Tomorrow

Royse AgTech Innovation Network

SeedDaily

Sensorland

SolarDaily

SpaceDaily

SPAR 3D News

Spatial Times

Spatialsource

Startupedia

STEM Education Entrepreneurship

Sundance Media Group

Surveying Group

TechEvents.Online

TerraDaily

UAS Sidekick

UASWeekly

UAV Coach

UAV Digest

Unmannednews.net

Unmanned Airspace

Urban Air Mobility News

Urban Mobility Daily

Urban Transport News

UST.com

WindDaily

Women In Tech Review

World Construction Today

 

ANALYSTS

ABI Research

BIS Research

Drone Analyst

Drone Business Center

Drone Industry Insights

Frost & Sullivan

Geospatial Media

GRADD

HAPTIC R & D Consulting

Indian Institute Of Drones

Juan Plaza Consulting

Mind Commerce

P3 Tech Consulting

Roswell Flight Test Crew

 

ASSOCIATIONS & USER GROUPS

AI Coding Meetup

AIRT

APANT

APD

ARPAS-UK

Canada 5G Council

Chartered ICES

Coalition Of UAS Professionals

Commercial Drone Alliance

CWTA

Deep Learning Meetup

Drone Federation Of India

DroneCode

DroneMasters

Droneresponders

Fuel Cell & Hydrogen Energy Association

Google Developers East Bay

GUTMA

IPv6 Forum

JUIDA

NATE

NVBAA

Open Geo Consortium

Shenzhen UAV Association

Silicon Valley Forum

STACouncil

SWARM-SAR Drones

UAVA

UAVAI

WITI

WITI Las Vegas

Women Who Code

Women Who Drone

World Geospatial Industry Council

World UAV Federation

 

COOPERATING EVENTS

Airwards

Amsterdam Drone Week

Autonomy Digital

Dronemasters Global Meetup

Expodronica

GeoIgnite Canada

Geospatial World Forum

Japan Drone

Shenzhen UAV Show

Silicon Valley AgTech

Silicon Valley Women Tech Festival

STAC

WITI Summit

The 2019 edition of Commercial UAV Expo Americas drew in 3,100 attendees, 200+ exhibitors, and 200+ presenters from over 50 countries. The full list of supporters and attendees who took part in the event can be found here. Special features of the 2021 event include live outdoor drone demonstrations and the DRONERESPONDERS Public Safety Summit with two full days of programming for drone operators and program managers across law enforcement, fire, search & rescue, and other emergency services for strategic discussions and workshops surrounding the evolving use of unmanned aircraft systems. New this year, the UAM Summit, organized by Amsterdam Drone Week, will be a platform for knowledge-sharing and where key players co-create and cooperate to create urban air mobility solutions together.

Full event information, including workshops, conference programming, networking events and more will be available soon. Registration for the 2021 event will open in June – stay in the know.

About Commercial UAV Expo Americas

Commercial UAV Expo Americas, presented by Commercial UAV News, is an international conference and expo exclusively focused on commercial UAS integration and operation covering industries including Construction; Energy & Utilities; Forestry & Agriculture; Infrastructure & Transportation; Mining & Aggregates; Public Safety & Emergency Services; Security; and Surveying & Mapping. It takes place September 7-9, 2021 at The Mirage in Las Vegas. The next edition of its European sister event will take place December 7-9, 2021 at the RAI Amsterdam as part of Amsterdam Drone Week. For more information, visit www.expouav.com and www.expouav.com/europe.

Commercial UAV Expo Americas is produced by Diversified Communications’ technology portfolio which also includes Commercial UAV Expo Europe; Commercial UAV News; Geo Week comprised of the International Lidar Mapping Forum, SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference; Geo Week ENewsletter, SPAR 3D ENewsletter, AEC Next ENewsletter. For more information about exhibiting at Commercial UAV Expo, visit Exhibiting Information or contact Katherine Dow, Sales Manager, at kdow@divcom.com or +1.207-842-5497. For attending information, visit www.expouav.com or email info@expouav.com.


ECMC Foundation Grants $1.125 Million to American Indian College Fund to Boost Workforce in North Dakota and Montana

Denver, Colo., March 31, 2021 — The American Indian College Fund is announcing ECMC Foundation’s grant of $1.125 million to fund two programs at tribal colleges and universities in North Dakota and Montana. This grant will help fuel Native American student success in careers in healthcare and education.

The North Dakota program “Strengthening Postsecondary Career Pathways Across North Dakota’s Tribal Colleges: Braiding Workforce Development and Native Student Success” provides $500,000 for a two-year program to develop a cohesive system to deliver health care education, stackable credentials, and coordinated career support. The program will align academic programming to support Native student credentialing and prepare students. Program graduates will help North Dakota meet its needs for state and tribal healthcare workers and improve healthcare career and citizen health outcomes. The program will also help increase the capacity of North Dakota TCUs.

All five North Dakota TCUs will participate in the program, which include Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Fort Totten; Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College, New Town; Sitting Bull College, Fort Yates; Turtle Mountain Community College, Belcourt; and United Tribes Technical College, Bismarck.

The Montana TCU program “Building Montana Tribal College Transfer Pathways for Student Success” provides $625,000 to strengthen transfer pathways between participating Montana TCUs over two-and-a-half-years. The program will support Native student completion and employment in the healthcare and education fields. It will also increase student transfer rates between Montana TCUs by building progressive education pathways from certificate to associate to baccalaureate degrees using transfer policies, procedures, and student support programs. The goal is to increase the TCUs’ capacity to support Native student success, on-time student transfer, and degree completion.

Participating Montana TCUs include Aaniiih Nakoda College, Harlem; Blackfeet Community College, Browning; Chief Dull Knife College, Lame Deer; Fort Peck Community College, Poplar; Little Big Horn College, Crow Agency; Salish Kootenai College, Pablo; and Stone Child College, Box Elder.

“Since our founding, ECMC Foundation has focused on improving the educational and workforce outcomes for underserved students,” said ECMC Foundation President Peter J. Taylor. “We’re thrilled to support The College Fund’s critical work at the intersection of these issues, ensuring that more Native students are well-placed for the in-demand careers that will be central to our economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “This is an exciting and challenging time as TCUs develop more employment opportunities for Native and rural students through innovative and collaborative approaches to high-demand careers. We are pleased that ECMC Foundation recognized that TCUs serve as solid, community-based assets, building tribal and regional economies through meaningful employment.”

About ECMC Foundation—Based in Los Angeles, ECMC Foundation is a national foundation working to facilitate improvements that affect post-secondary educational outcomes — especially among underserved populations — through evidence-based innovation. It is one of several affiliates under the ECMC Group enterprise based in Minneapolis, which together work to help students succeed. The Foundation invests in College Success and Career Readiness (CTE); and uses a spectrum of funding structures, including strategic grantmaking and program-related investments, to fund both nonprofit and for-profit ventures. Visit ecmcfoundation.org to learn more.

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


LGBTQ+-OWNED AEQUALITAS MEDIA LAUNCHES NEW BRAND OUTvoices

● Aequalitas Media rebrands legacy LGBTQ+ publications as OUTvoices ● The multiplatform entity includes print, digital, TV, radio, and more ● All assets owned by Aequalitas Media, which is NGLCC Certified

Chicago, Illinois​ — ​​Following the 2020 acquisitions of legacy LGBTQ+ titles ​Echo Magazine Phoenix​ (​ 31 years); ​Out & About Nashville Magazine​ (16 years); and ​CAMP Kansas City Magazine​ (17 years), ​Aequalitas Media​ has launched ​OUTvoices​, a new national LGBTQ+ brand. The ​OUTvoices ​brand will deliver diverse, fresh, and original LGBTQ+ print, digital, audio and video content.

The publications will be rebranded under the OUTvoices umbrella.​ ​Effective April 2nd 2021, all titles currently owned and published by Aequalitas Media with the exception of Gaycation Magazine​, will be renamed to reflect their inclusion in the OUTvoices network.

Echo magazine will become OUTvoices Phoenix, ​OUT & ABOUT Nashville​ will become OUTvoices Nashville, and ​CAMP​ will become OUTvoices Kansas City. “I couldn’t be more thrilled with the introduction of OUTvoices and the conversion of the titles we own underneath this new, truly inclusive brand — a one-stop opportunity for brands to easily and effectively advertise to this lucrative market,” ​said DJ Doran, CEO of Aequalitas Media. LGBTQ+ veteran journalist and former Editor in Chief of ​Curve​ Magazine, Merryn Johns will join our editorial team to steer content under the new OUTvoices brand beginning April 2nd 2021.

The ​OUTvoices ​brand will deliver diverse, fresh, and original LGBTQ+ print, digital, audio and video content. The publications will be rebranded under the OUTvoices umbrella.​ ​Effective April 2nd 2021, all titles currently owned and published by Aequalitas Media with the exception of Gaycation Magazine​, will be renamed to reflect their inclusion in the OUTvoices network. ​Echo magazine will become OUTvoices Phoenix, ​OUT & ABOUT Nashville​ will become OUTvoices Nashville, and ​CAMP​ will become OUTvoices Kansas City.

“I couldn’t be more thrilled with the introduction of OUTvoices and the conversion of the titles we own underneath this new, truly inclusive brand — a one-stop opportunity for brands to easily and effectively advertise to this lucrative market,” ​said DJ Doran, CEO of Aequalitas Media.

LGBTQ+ veteran journalist and former Editor in Chief of ​Curve​ Magazine, Merryn Johns will join our editorial team to steer content under the new OUTvoices brand beginning April 2nd 2021.

“​I am thrilled to bring my passion for serving LGBTQ+ readers to OUTvoices and to bring them the best quality content possible, nationwide​,” ​said Johns​.

Additionally,​ OUTvoices Chicago​ will go live in Q2 of 2021. The new LGBTQ+ news and lifestyle website will feature originally produced articles and stories from the LGBTQ+ community in Chicago as well as curated content from other members of the OUTvoices network. Visitors to the new ​OUTvoices.us​ ​website and many other LGBTQ+ websites will be able to listen to ​OUTvoices Radio​, 24/7 LGBTQ+ talk radio.

OUTvoices Radio​, scheduled to launch later in March 2021, will be the first internet-based streaming LGBTQ+ talk radio station offering listeners pre-recorded and live programming 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The lineup includes shows from LGBTQ+ thought leaders, entertainers, entrepreneurs, musicians, and more. The OUTvoices Radio widget will be offered to ALL LGBTQ+ websites at no cost. “​It is part of our company philosophy of supporting other LGBTQ+ medias by sharing content for FREE,” said Doran.

It will be followed by ​OUTvoices TV ​in late Q2 of 2021 and will feature originally produced series such as The Gaycation Travel Show with host Ravi Roth. Season 1 will begin airing new episodes airing every Friday beginning May 14th. OUTvoicesTV is currently filming The Gay Gourmet, a cooking show with Oprah Winfrey’s former personal Chef Art Smith and Joe Eats World Chef Joe Morales as hosts.

OUTvoices TV​ will offer viewers access via our YouTube channel to high quality shows that reflect the depth and breadth of talent within the LGBTQ+ community in News, Opinion, Fashion, Travel, Food, and more.

The nationally focused website ​OUTvoices.us​ domain has been chosen as a reflection of ​us​, the LGBTQ+ community. As a website, it will encourage small-to-medium LGBTQ+ sites to unite under the OUTvoices domain. This will allow smaller sites that may have been overlooked by major brands and agencies to combine their audiences and analytics to be more attractive to advertisers. The OUTvoices network will also allow other members to share and benefit from resources, content, and exposure in beneficial ways.

Other Aequalitas acquisitions and initiatives for 2021 include:

  • ● LGBTQ+ Media Acquisitions, Aequalitas Media​ currently has three LGBTQ+ media assets in the pipeline which are scheduled to close sometime in 2021.
  • The Gay Travel Business Network, a new business-to-business travel organization led by LGBTQ+ travel expert and Executive Director Ed Salvato and a board of travel luminaries helping tourism, hospitality and travel-related businesses and brands better connect with other like-minded businesses desiring to do business with each other.
  • Aequalitas Content Creators Association​,​ a​ 501c6 organization for LGBTQ+ content creators to gather at an annual conference in late August in Cedar Rapids IA to network with each other and listen to industry experts and exchange ideas and best practices toward increasing reach and revenue as the industry continues to evolve.
  • NGLCC(National LGBT Chamber of Commerce) Certification, ​Aequalitas Media ​and all of the assets under its umbrella have been certified as LGBT business enterprises by the NGLCC.

“The expanding portfolio of LGBTQ+ media assets and these new ventures strengthen Aequalitas Mediaand create additional value for our advertisers, clients and partners as well as contribute to the revitalization of LGBTQ+ media in 2021 and beyond​,” ​said Doran​.

ABOUT AEQUALITAS MEDIA

Aequalitas Media​​ [​pronounced e-QUAL-i-tas​] is one of the fastest growing LGBTQ+ media companies in the U.S., from spanning print, digital publishing and media buying to managing a 24/7 LGBTQ+ talk radio station and a national network of LGBTQ+ websites. ​Aequalitas Media​ is well positioned for growth in 2021 and beyond. Our company’s Advisory Board is made up of some of the best and brightest in LGBTQ+ media and business giving us a distinctive edge over our competitors when it comes to delivering results and evolving opportunities to expand our reach.


NOGLSTP Announces 2021 Recognition Award Winners

NOGLSTP is proud to announce the winners of its 2021 recognition awards for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) professionals in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). NOGLSTP has been recognizing exemplary individuals with LGTBQ+ Educator, Engineer, and Scientist of the year awards for over 15 years. NOGLSTP is also awarding its Walt Westman Award for outstanding contribution to its mission to support LGBTQ+ people in STEM.

2021 LGBTQ+ Educator of the Year: Professor Miles Ott

Professor Miles Ott headshot
Professor Miles Ott

The LGBTQ+ Educator of the Year award recognizes an educator who has significantly impacted STEM students through teaching, counseling, advocacy, and role modeling. Dr. Ott is an Assistant Professor of Statistical and Data Sciences at Smith College. His research focuses on the statistical analysis of social network data, network sampling methodologies, and the statistical implications of missing data in social networks. Ott applies these methods to the areas of substance abuse in emerging adults, HIV surveillance in hard-to-reach populations, and LGBTQ+ health.

In addition to inspiring students in the classroom, Prof. Ott serves as a research mentor and advisor. He has supervised independent projects, many of which are resulting in publications including mental health in transgender individuals as well as social network analyses to examine how positive health behaviors can proliferate through social connections. These research themes allow Ott to engage with LGBTQ+ students and fellow educators. He shares his teaching and personal experiences as a trans person in academia openly through his blog (milesott.com).

Prof. Ott’s impact on students both academically and personally was a powerfully moving theme in his letters of support. One student noted “as a professor he goes above and beyond to engage and delight his students into exploring new subjects… as a mentor and friend, he is encouraging and warm, always willing to offer a listening ear”. Another student stated, “he has supported so many other queer and transgender students, because he knows how difficult it is for many of us to find the kind of acceptance and encouragement necessary to succeed in STEM.”

When asked what advice he would give future LGBTQ+ STEM individuals, it is: “Your environment is tremendously important for your success. Look for mentors and colleagues who see you as a whole person and not just as a collection of accomplishments. The work it takes to find the right environment is always worth it. When you get the chance, be the supportive colleague or mentor that helps someone else do their best work.”

2021 LGBTQ+ Engineer of the Year: Guillermo Díaz-Fañas

Guillermo Díaz-Fañas
Guillermo Díaz-Fañas

The LGBTQ+ Engineer of the Year Award recognizes someone who has made outstanding contributions to their field, and recognizes the awardee for sustained contributions in design, production, management, or research. Guillermo Díaz-Fañas is an Infrastructure Climate Consultant at the Public-Private Infrastructure Advisory Facility (PPIAF) in the World Bank. In this role, Guillermo works with PPIAF grantees to introduce climate resilience and environmental sustainability in the policy and planning of private participation in infrastructure.

Díaz-Fañas was born in the Dominican Republic and moved to the U.S. for graduate school. Prior to joining PPIAF, he spent over ten years managing large infrastructure projects and leading climate and multi-hazard disaster resilience assessments. Díaz-Fañas is a recognized leader in earthquake and geotechnical engineering; he has published over 30 scientific articles and conference abstracts on the subject.

He has received numerous recognitions and awards for his contributions to the engineering community, including being the first openly gay individual to be awarded the New Faces of Civil Engineering title by the American Society of Civil Engineering (ASCE) in 2018. Other recognitions include 2020 Crain’s NY Notable LGBTQ Leaders and Executives, 2020 Earthquake Engineering Research Institute (EERI) Younger Member Award, 2019 ASCE Met Section Younger Member Award, 2019 ENR New York Top 20 under 40. In addition to his professional impact, NOGLSTP recognizes Díaz-Fañas’s work in increasing diversity and inclusion in civil engineering. One of these efforts is the founding of the national non-profit Queer Advocacy and Knowledge Exchange (Qu-AKE), an inclusive network for LGBTQ+ individuals pursuing careers infrastructure consulting, construction and design.

When asked about the scientific and social justice issues that keep him up at night, Díaz-Fañas did not hesitate in listing his three passions—climate change, geophysical hazards, and intersectionality. His disaster relief work drives efforts to “include sustainable building practices to tackle the challenges of global climate change.” Working on diversity, inclusion and equity initiatives in ASCE, EERI and the Deep Foundations Institute, as well as starting Qu-AKE have taught him “that we should celebrate the intersectionality of people and not focus on organizing them into layers or silos. There is a lot more to be done to ensure we can hear from those that currently do not have a voice.”

2021 LGBTQ+ Scientist of the Year: Professor Joseph Romano

Professor Joseph Romano headshot
Professor Joseph Romano

The LGBTQ+ Scientist of the Year Award recognizes an individual who has made outstanding contributions to their field through design, research, or management. This year’s award winner is Dr. Joseph Romano, Professor of Statistics and Economics at Stanford University. Romano is a pre-eminent scholar in Statistics and Econometrics. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed publications in the areas of resampling, computer-intensive methods for nonparametric inference, and multiple hypothesis testing. These publications, along with three co-authored books, have impacted fields ranging from econometrics to climate science.

Romano has developed many new statistical tools, such as subsampling and the stationary bootstrap. The breadth and importance of Romano’s work are described in his letters of support, submitted by scholars across the United States and Europe. One letter notes that Romano has “made fundamental, indeed path-breaking, contributions to several distinct areas of statistics.” Another that he “pioneered novel uses of randomization tests…(leading to) a renewed interest in their use in economics.” These sentiments are shared by both the International Association of Applied Econometrics and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, where he is an Elected Fellow.

In addition to his scholarly contributions, Romano is a celebrated educator and advocate for all students. His letter writers note Romano, an open and out gay male, has been an inspiration to many LGBTQ+ students at Stanford. “Joe is extremely caring, and he is always keenly aware of his ability to be a positive influence for LGBTQ+ scientists. His stature enables him to act as an ambassador for them.”

His advice for the next generation of LGBTQ+ STEM professionals? “Enjoy the process, life is continually learning, and you are always evolving. Be authentic, patient, and stay in the moment.”

2021 Walt Westman Award: Daniele Cherniak

Daniele Cherniak headshot
Daniele Cherniak

The Walt Westman Award is the highest national award given by NOGLSTP. The 2021 award recognizes the unselfish and outstanding contributions of Dr. Daniele Cherniak, who has served as NOGLSTP Bulletin editor for ten consecutive years. During her time as the voice of the organization, Cherniak worked diligently to develop an efficient and professional means of communicating with the membership.

Cherniak is a Senior Research Scientist in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She earned her Ph.D. in physics from SUNY Albany. She has since crossed disciplines where she focuses on geochemistry, specifically the characterization of atomic diffusion in rock-forming minerals. In this work, she employs the accelerator-based ion beam techniques Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Nuclear Reaction Analysis to measure diffusion profiles on the submicron scale, focusing on optimizing experimental and analytical techniques to measure the very slow diffusivities characteristic of many species in these materials. These data have application in a variety of fields, including studies of the early Earth, evolution of the Earth and extraterrestrial planets, and changes in chemical environments over time.

The Board of Directors commended Cherniak, who has served as a model for others and the organization as an out LGBTQ+ professional. She acknowledges that working as an academic researcher has changed during her career as “people are more open to diversity, and the environment is more welcome to women and LGBTQ+ contributions.” When asked what advice she has for future LGBTQ+ individuals pursuing STEM, her advice is true to her character. “Follow your interests, and don’t be afraid to be yourself.”

The winners will be invited to an awards ceremony later this year.

About NOGLSTP NOGLSTP was established in 1980, incorporated in the state of California in 1991, and was granted IRS 501 (c) 3 nonprofit status in 1992. NOGLSTP is a professional society that educates and advocates for LGBTQ people in STEM. NOGLSTP presents educational symposia and workshops nationwide and fosters dialog with other professional societies, academia, and industry to facilitate diversity and inclusion in the workplace. NOGLSTP is an affiliate of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, is a participating professional society member of MentorNet®, a sustaining member of the National Postdoctoral Association, a member of the Gay and Lesbian Leadership Institute’s Presidential Advisory Project’s Coalition, a partner with the Higher Education Recruitment Consortium, a partner of the Society for Women Engineers, a sustaining partner of the National Postdoctoral Association, and a founding member of the E-Week Diversity Council. For more information, visit the website at www.noglstp.org or contact scholarships@noglstp.org.


NOGLSTP Announces Ben Barres Fellowship Winners

NOGLSTP, the National Organization of Gay and Lesbian Scientists and Technical Professionals, is proud to announce the winners for the 2020 NOGLSTP Ben Barres Fellowships made possible by an anonymous donor. The fellowships are named after Ben Barres, a distinguished transgender scientist at Stanford who researched the role of microglia, an immune cell of the brain, and its interaction with neurons in development and disease. Barres was an ardent campaigner for equal opportunity in science, advocating for underrepresented groups, and was a valued mentor to young scientists. He told his story through a posthumous memoir released after his death from cancer in 2017 at age 63.

Eleven applicants for NOGLSTP’s Ben Barres Fellowship have been awarded amounts ranging from $2550 to $5000. The Ben Barres Fellowship award is for professional development of trans, intersex, and non-binary graduate students and post-doctoral fellows in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). This year’s fellows are in the fields of neuroscience, astronomy, astrophysics, biochemistry, biophysics, bioengineering, evolution, ecology, and microbiology at universities in the US, Canada, and England. This is a merit-based award, and the support provided is intended, broadly construed, for the recipient’s professional development.

Because of the pandemic, the majority of the funds were awarded for equipment, software, and supplies instead of travel.

The winners of these fellowships are not required to disclose their award in publicity for these awards. The winners who have allowed us to disclose their awards are:

Stephanie Nelli is a Post-Doctoral Fellow at Oxford University studying the ability to rapidly learn and reconfigure knowledge by human neuroimaging and neural network simulations.

Esti Blanco-Elorrieta is a Post-Doctoral fellow in Psychology at Harvard University’s Cognitive Neuropsychology Laboratory studying the neurobiology of multilingualism by using a combination of neuroimaging, computational, and behavioral methods.

Kat Ellis-Guardiola is a Post-Doctoral Researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles, investigating the underlying mechanisms of the proteins used by S. aureus to uptake heme.

Vivian Miranda is a Postdoctoral /Research Associate at the Steward Observatory of the University of Arizona, investigating dark energy through space missions in combination with ground-based observatories.

Tran Thanh Tam Pham is a graduate student in biophysics at Dalhousie University studying the metabolomics of interaction between a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), the apelin receptor (AR), and its endogenous ligands, the bioactive apelin peptides.

Toby Santamaria is a graduate student in the College of Natural Science Department of Plant Biology at the Michigan State University, studying restoration ecology and terrestrial biogeochemistry.

Sun Simha is a graduate student at New York University, studying the plasticity of neurons in response to changes in activity levels.

Claudia Astorino is an evolutionary biologist and biological anthropologist finishing up a Ph.D. at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), in affiliation with the New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology, studying the variation of sexual dimorphism in the human skull.

Eliot Halley Vrijmoet is a graduate student at Georgia State University Department of Physics and Astronomy, studying the sizes and shapes of multi-star systems orbits in the solar neighborhood (within 25 pc or 82 light-years of Earth).

Anita Simha is a graduate student at Duke University, studying how plant species interact and coexist through the effect of fire history and the present community composition.

The winners will be invited to the next Out To Innovate Summit for LGBTQ+ People in STEM Awards ceremony the date to be announced later.

About NOGLSTP

NOGLSTP was established in 1980, incorporated in the state of California in 1991, and was granted IRS 501 (c) 3 nonprofit status in 1992. NOGLSTP is a professional society that educates and advocates for LGBTQ people in STEM. NOGLSTP presents educational symposia and workshops nationwide and fosters dialog with other professional societies, academia, and industry to facilitate diversity and inclusion in the workplace. NOGLSTP is an affiliate of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, is a participating professional society member of MentorNet®, a sustaining member of the National Postdoctoral Association, a member of the Gay and Lesbian Leadership Institute’s Presidential Advisory Project’s Coalition, a partner with the Higher Education Recruitment Consortium, a partner of the Society for Women Engineers, a sustaining partner of the National Postdoctoral Association, and a founding member of the E-Week Diversity Council. For more information, visit the website at www.noglstp.org or contact scholarships@noglstp.org.

Disclaimer – These awards are not related to the Ben Barres Fellowship given by Stanford University and the Ben Barres Family.


Advisory Board Set for Geo Week February 6-8, 2022 in Denver, CO

16 experts have been tapped to help craft critical programming for Geo Week</p

Organizers of  Geo Week, the single powerhouse event that brings together AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, have announced an impressive list of influential leaders within the geospatial and built world industries who will be participating on the 2022 event’s Advisory Board.  The Advisory Board is responsible for recommending conference topics and speakers, reviewing submitted abstracts, consulting on the program, and acting as a resource to develop different aspects of the event. The 2022 event will take place February 6-8, 2022 in Denver, Colorado.

In addition to Diversified Communications’ technology events coming together, powerful partnership events will also take place at Geo Week, including the ASPRS (American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing) Annual Conference and USIBD’s (U.S. Institute of Building Documentation) Annual Symposium.

“The Geo Week Advisory Board is comprised of industry leaders who will help craft programming, recommend speakers, and deliver critical insights to geospatial and built world professionals at the launch of the highly anticipated event in 2022,” said Lee Corkhill, Group Director at Diversified Communications, organizer of the event., “The Board represents a mix of key market vertical players, top vendors, and regulatory experts to address the most pressing issues facing the geospatial, 3D and built world environments today.  Board members are at the top of their fields and they are ready to bring their connections and commitment to delivering the best conference and expo the geospatial and built markets have ever seen.”

Members of the 2022 Geo Week Advisory Board include:

  • Qassim Abdullah, Vice President & Chief Scientist, Woolpert, Inc.
  • Kelly Cone, Vice President of Industry Strategy, ClearEdge3D
  • Kevin Dowling, CEO, Kaarta
  • Danielle Dy Buncio, Co-Founder & CEO, VIATechnik
  • Martin Flood, Vice President, Special Projects, GeoCue Group Inc.
  • Birgitta Foster, Program Lead, Asset Management, Sandia National Laboratories
  • Thomas Haun, Chief Operating Officer, Turner Mining Group
  • Kourosh Langari, BIM Manager, Caltrans
  • Robert Mankowski, Senior Vice President, Digital Cities, Bentley Systems, Inc.
  • Amar Nayegandhi, Senior Vice President, Dewberry Engineers, Inc.
  • Cody Nowak, Founder, CUBE
  • Scott Simmons, Chief Standards Officer, OGC
  • Jason Stoker, Physical Scientist, USGS
  • Dan Stonecipher, Senior Director of Innovation, PROCON, Inc.
  • Stewart Walker, Managing Editor, LIDAR Magazine
  • Geoff Zeiss, Principal, Between the Poles

Bios may be found here.

The coming together of AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference to form Geo Week reflects the increased integration between the built environment, advanced airborne/terrestrial technologies, and commercial 3D technologies. Geo Week is at the forefront of this integration, providing education, technology, and resources for professionals in industries including AEC, Asset & Facility Management, Disaster & Emergency Response, Earth Observation & Satellite Applications, Energy & Utilities, Infrastructure & Transportation, Land & Natural Resource Management, Mining & Aggregates, Surveying & Mapping, and Urban Planning/Smart Cities.

Bentley Systems’ Senior Vice President of Digital Cities and Advisory Board Member, Robert Mankowski, had this to say: “AEC Next, ILMF, and SPAR 3D coming together to the Geo Week 2022 event reflects what we see happening in the infrastructure industry. As owner-operators and engineering project delivery firms strive to improve the performance of their assets and projects, they are turning to digital twins, which require, among other things, the convergence of reality modeling, GIS, BIM, and engineering models. Geo Week 2022 is set to provide infrastructure professionals with visibility into the core technologies, best practices, and real-world examples of how digital twins are driving better outcomes.”

Said Advisory Board member Kelly Cone, Vice President of Industry Strategy, ClearEdge3D, “While I’m looking forward to ANY event I can actually attend in person; I’m particularly excited about the conjunction of SPAR 3D, AEC Next, ILMF into a single event for 2022! Far too often we silo ourselves into an industry, but this is precisely why innovations are slow to migrate from one industry to another. The geospatial industry is responsible for the information the built world is constructed upon; and there is so much overlap in technology, processes, and knowledge. Bringing these three events together is a great opportunity for us all to learn from each other and share the tools and processes each industry is excelling at applying.”

According to Corkhill, there will be content that addresses the built environment, advanced airborne/terrestrial technologies, and commercial 3D technologies independently of one another and attendees will have access across all conference sessions. “The event represents a continuum, with individuals and organizations from all corners of industry at differing levels of adoption.  Geo Week will support a future vision, in which professionals and organizations that understand the full spectrum of data needs, work processes, software integration, and standards in both geospatial and BIM will be tomorrow’s technology leaders,” said Corkhill.

The event will feature multiple tracks with content clearly identified as relevant to one or more of the audience groups feeding into Geo Week. The International Lidar Mapping Forum (ILMF) audience has historically been comprised of precision measurement professionals in surveying and mapping who use airborne and terrestrial lidar and related remote sensing technologies. The AEC Next audience has historically been comprised of professionals in architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) that use technologies such as reality capture, automation, AI and XR to bid and manage projects and improve workflows. The SPAR 3D audience has historically been comprised of professionals who use 3D capture, scanning, visualization and modeling technologies across a variety of verticals.

Geo Week takes place February 6-8, 2022, with conference programming and exhibits Sunday, February 6 through Tuesday, February 8. Additional features of the programming are vendor-delivered Product Previews, Exhibition Theaters, workshops, and conference programming hosted by ASPRS and USIBD.  

About Geo Week

Geo Week is part of a network of events and media for the global geospatial and built markets organized by Diversified Communications, a leading organizer of conferences, trade shows, and online media with 15 years in the technology arena. Geo Week, taking place February 6-8, 2022, is the new brand name of previously stand-alone events AEC Next Technology Expo & Conference, International Lidar Mapping Forum, and SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, and reflects the increased integration between the built environment, advanced airborne/terrestrial technologies, and commercial 3D technologies. Powerful partnership events will also take place at Geo Week, including ASPRS (American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing) and USIBD (US Institute of Building Documentation). Diversified Communications also produces Geo Week ENewsletter, SPAR 3D ENewsletter, AEC ENewsletter, GeoBusiness Show (UK), Commercial UAV Expo Americas, Commercial UAV Europe and Commercial UAV News. For more information, visit www.geo-week.com.


About Diversified Communications

Diversified Communications is a leading international media company with a portfolio of face-to-face exhibitions and conferences, online communities, and digital and print publications. As producers of these market-leading products, Diversified Communications connects, educates, and strengthens business communities in over 14 industries including technology, food and beverage, healthcare, natural and organic, and business management. Established in 1949 and headquartered in Portland, Maine, USA with divisions and offices around the world, Diversified Communications remains a privately held, third generation, family-owned business. For more information, visit www.divcom.com.


Millions of American Indian College Fund Scholarship Dollars Available for California’s Native American Students

Applications Open February 1, 2021 for The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship, Sponsored by the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians

Native American college students from qualified California tribes have millions of dollars of scholarship funds available to them through the American Indian College Fund’s Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship, sponsored by the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians.

Funds are available to most California tribal members seeking higher education, including technical and vocational certifications and associate, bachelor’s, and graduate degrees. Students earning a technical or vocational certification can get up to $5,000 per year. Students attending a state or private community college or university can get up to $20,000 per year.

Enrolled members of California tribes which receive little or no gaming or agricultural revenue from the state are eligible. Interested students can learn more and apply online beginning February 1, 2021 at collegefund.org/california.

The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship program was created as part of The Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians’ longstanding traditions and values in support of the education and development of youth – and funded by the 2016 Tribal State Gaming Compact with the State of California.

Christopher Villaruel, Chandra Norton, and Kenwa Kravitz are three recipients who are realizing their education and career goals thanks to The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship.

Christopher Villaruel, a member of the Pit River Tribe and a senior forest hydrology major at Humboldt State University, plans to combine his education and training with traditional knowledge to create better managed forests that are less susceptible to devastating fires and to maintain watershed health, providing cleaner water for all Californians.

Chandra Norton, a member of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is working on her bachelor’s degree in community advocates and responsive education in human services. She plans to seek a master’s degree in public health administration to assist her in her career with her community’s local health clinic.

Kenwa Kravitz, a member of the Pit River Tribe, is studying Native studies leadership. She advocates in her community as a member of the Redding Cultural District Board. Her efforts have led to the land acknowledgement of the Wintu people, a formal apology, and creation of culturally informed education curricula.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “Expanding support of American Indian and Alaska Native students is a shared goal of the American Indian College Fund and The Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship will provide eligible students with amazing support for their journey of college success.”

In addition to The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship, the College Fund offers many additional scholarship opportunities to American Indian and Alaskan Native students from across the nation seeking a higher education. To learn more visit https://www.collegefund.org.

About the American Indian College Fund: The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


AT&T Gives $1.5 Million in Pandemic-Related Supplies to More Than 20 Tribal Colleges and Universities

Tribal Colleges and Universities on Indian Reservations Receive Supplies The American Indian College Fund and the American Indian Higher Education Consortium are receiving $1.5M in pandemic-related supplies including hand sanitizer, disinfectant and gloves. Both organizations are working with AT&T to distribute the supplies to more than 20 tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) across the country. This comes as Native communities face soaring COVID-19 infection rates, rolling lockdowns are enacted on Indian reservations, and tribal community members are having difficulties accessing supplies. Native American communities suffer COVID-19 infection rates greater than 3.5 times that of the white population, according to the Centers for Disease Control. The American Indian College Fund is the largest provider of scholarships to Native American students in the nation, and the American Indian Higher Education Consortium is the national advocacy organization supporting tribal college and universities. The two organizations worked with AT&T to ship the supplies to the following TCUs, including:

  • The American Indian Higher Education Consortium, Washington, D.C.
  • Blackfeet Community College, Montana
  • College of Menominee Nation, Wisconsin
  • College of the Muscogee Nation, Oklahoma
  • Diné College, Arizona
  • Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, Minnesota
  • Fort Peck Community College, Montana
  • Iḷisaġvik College, Alaska
  • Institute of American Indian Arts, New Mexico
  • Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe College, Wisconsin
  • Little Big Horn College, Montana
  • Little Priest Tribal College, Nebraska
  • Navajo Technical University, New Mexico
  • Northwest Indian College, Washington
  • Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College, North Dakota
  • Oglala Lakota College, South Dakota
  • Red Lake Nation College, Minnesota
  • Salish Kootenai College, Montana
  • Sinte Gleska University, South Dakota
  • Stone Child College, Montana
  • Tohono O’odham Community College, Arizona
  • Turtle Mountain Tribal College, North Dakota
  • White Earth Tribal and Community College, Montana
Albert Gourneau (left) and Anthony Desjarlais (right) from Turtle Mountain Community College’s facilities department prepare to distribute sanitizing supplies and safety equipment at the tribal college campus in Belcourt, North Dakota

“We are glad to play our part to help provide the critical resources Native communities need to survive the COVID-19 pandemic, which has disproportionately affected Native Americans this year,” said Tom Brooks, Vice President of External and Legislative Affairs at AT&T. “There is much more work to be done to ensure Native American communities have access to the resources needed to get through the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. We look forward to continuing this vital work with the American Indian College Fund and American Indian Higher Education Consortium to address this.” Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “On behalf of our tribal colleges and universities and our sister organization, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, I want to share our deep appreciation of AT&T’s gift of pandemic-related supplies for our communities. Our rural, economically distressed communities need support to protect the health and well-being of students and their families. The commitment of AT&T to helping address health and other disparities in the U.S. is demonstrated through their generous support.” AT&T has been a long supporter of the American Indian College Fund to turn reservations into places of opportunity. The long relationship with the American Indian College Fund has helped Native American students with income and geographical barriers earn a college degree through funded support at the 35 Tribal Colleges and Universities around the country.

Peter Romero, Director of Facilities and Security at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, readies the college’s newly delivered supply.

About AT&T— AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T) is a diversified, global leader in telecommunications, media and entertainment, and technology. AT&T Communications provides more than 100 million U.S. consumers with entertainment and communications experiences across TV, mobile and broadband. Plus, it serves high-speed, highly secure connectivity and smart solutions to nearly 3 million business customers. WarnerMedia is a leading media and entertainment company that creates and distributes premium and popular content to global audiences through its consumer brands, including: HBO, HBO Max, Warner Bros., TNT, TBS, truTV, CNN, DC Entertainment, New Line, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim and Turner Classic Movies. Xandr, now part of WarnerMedia, provides marketers with innovative and relevant advertising solutions for consumers around premium video content and digital advertising through its platform. AT&T Latin America provides pay-TV services across 10 countries and territories in Latin America and the Caribbean and wireless services to consumers and businesses in Mexico. AT&T products and services are provided or offered by subsidiaries and affiliates of AT&T Inc. under the AT&T brand and not by AT&T Inc. Additional information is available at about.att.com. © 2021 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, the Globe logo and other marks are trademarks and service marks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other marks contained herein are the property of their respective owners. About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Early Childhood Education Linked to Long-Term Education Attainment

American Indian College Fund to Strengthen Early Childhood Teacher Pipeline with Support from The W.K. Kellogg Foundation

Denver, Colo.—January 14, 2021— Early childhood education can help close the college education attainment gap among American Indians and Alaska Natives—which is currently less than half of other groups at 14.8%—by improving students’ academic achievement, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Thanks to a two-year, $600,000 grant from The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the American Indian College Fund will help tribal college communities strengthen and expand the pipeline for Native teachers through its Indigenous Early Childhood Education Systemic Engagement and ECE Learning in Native American Communities program.

Native teachers serve as critical role models engendering the success of young Native American students, while understanding the unique needs of their students. In addition to improving young children’s long-term educational attainment, early childhood education can also reduce the need for special education and increase employment and earnings, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

The American Indian College Fund’s two-year systemic engagement program will provide program mentorship between tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) and their students and will help increase TCUs’ capacity to address and eliminate barriers for Native American college students seeking a degree in early childhood education. The systemic engagement program will support dissemination of new knowledge and methods of culturally centered early childhood education in tribal college communities. The program began November 1, 2020.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “Native people know that our children come to us from a sacred place and that their socialization is critical to their own well-being and to the well-being of tribal nations. We appreciate our partnership with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation because it results in our TCUs adapting our teachings and practices into modern infrastructure, demonstrating resiliency and commitment to kinship and identity.”

About The W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF)—The W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF), founded in 1930 as an independent, private foundation by breakfast cereal innovator and entrepreneur Will Keith Kellogg, is among the largest philanthropic foundations in the United States. Guided by the belief that all children should have an equal opportunity to thrive, WKKF works with communities to create conditions for vulnerable children so they can realize their full potential in school, work and life.

The Kellogg Foundation is based in Battle Creek, Michigan, and works throughout the United States and internationally, as well as with sovereign tribes. Special attention is paid to priority places where there are high concentrations of poverty and where children face significant barriers to success. WKKF priority places in the U.S. are in Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico and New Orleans; and internationally, are in Mexico and Haiti. For more information, visit www.wkkf.org

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


ERG Resource Group

Global ERG Network

Visit info@globalergnet.com for more information.


Grace Hopper Virtual Convention and more!

  • Grace Hopper Celebration AnitaB.org hosted our first ever virtual Grace Hopper Celebration which brought more than 30K attendees from 115+ countries – a 20% increase from last year’s attendance, and the largest attendance in AnitaB.org history. The event brought together more than 300 organizations across business, academia, STEAM labs, government and nonprofits to network and share insight.
  • Ongoing Donations – Through strategic partnership and our continued effort, we received notable donations from new and existing partners, including $100,000 from Craig Newmark Philanthropies, led by Craigslist founder, Craig Newmark, which supported our mainstay PitcHER program and our Tech Journey Scholarship.
  • Membership Program – This year, we officially launched the AnitaB.org Membership Program – a support system of resources and tools for women in tech to more than 20K members, 365 days of the year.
  • Scholarships & Grants  – Through our wide range of grant programs, AnitaB.org has supported women at every point in their tech journey – from budding computer scientists, to entrepreneurs and senior leadership. When COVID-19 shut down schools in March, the Tech Journey Scholarshiphelped more than 285 female tech students finish their degrees by providing nearly $200K in grants to help with basic needs like WIFI access, food, rent and tuition. #GivingTuesdayNow and Holiday Giving campaigns brought over $22K earned to date.
  • In-House Data & Statistics –  AnitaB.org generates data that works to inform the decisions of partners and community members alike. In March, we conducted our Technical Equity Experience (TechEES) Global COVID-19 Impact Pilot Survey to understand the unique impact of COVID-19 on technical women. This survey was a pilot intended to shape future ongoing research that will be used to help the computing and technical ecosystem cope with COVID-19 and the economic downturn. Our annual Top Companies Report identifies key trends around the equity of women technologists in the workforce, and remains the only benchmarking program that looks specifically at technical employees and awards companies that are making the most progress toward equity. 

American Indian College Fund to Award 10 Tribal Colleges and Universities with Grants for Native Arts Enrichment and Expansion of Existing Programs and Curriculum Development

Native communities have historically used traditional arts to transfer knowledge about culture, language, mathematics, science, and the land to their communities and upcoming generations. The American Indian College Fund is awarding $900,000 in grants to nine tribal colleges and universities for the two-and-a-half-year program to establish new Native arts programs and to expand existing Native arts programs at tribal colleges and universities (TCUs). In addition to transferring traditional arts knowledge to the next generation in Native communities, the grants will also ensure that Native arts are more deeply understood, more widely practiced, and more broadly recognized.

A total of 29 TCUs in the following 10 states are eligible to apply: Alaska, Arizona, Southern California, Montana, Minnesota, New Mexico North Dakota, South Dakota, Washington, and Wisconsin.

According to Bridget Skenadore, Program Officer of Native Arts and Culture at the College Fund, the goals of the program are to establish Native arts programs at the tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) to pass on cultural knowledge and artistic skills, ensuring Native communities are fluent in Native arts practice; to create leaders in tribal communities that champion the arts and foster equitable, accessible, safe practice within their communities; to connect Native communities to each other to create cultural corridors; to establish community-based anchor organizations or infrastructure to foster a thriving artistic environment conducive to creative practice; and to ensure community-based artistic and cultural continuity.

This program will continue the work the College Fund began in the Native arts space in 2013 with its three-year Restoration and Preservation of Traditional Native Arts and Knowledge, which was available to 13 TCUs located in the upper-Midwest states and was so successful that it was renewed for an additional three years. The grant laid the groundwork for building out successful Native arts programs by enhancing the capacity of TCUs through the development of new core academic classes and more structured community-based traditional Native arts programs, such as bow-making, quill work, and moccasin-making. The program also built capacity at TCUs for intergenerational transfer of Native artistic and cultural practices to tribal community members and students through funding for master artist, apprentice, and artist-in-residency programs.

Finally, the College Fund awarded seven TCUs with $3,000 Distance Learning grants to support transition from in-person classes and community events to an online format during the pandemic. Funding trainings, consulting services, publications, social media, printers, website subscription upgrades and/or other related items that support this area. Funding cannot be used for the purchase of technology such as laptops, tablets, or chrome books. Grants were awarded to Blackfeet Community College, College of Menominee Nation, Diné College, Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe College, Northwest Indian College, and Salish Kootenai College.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “The missions of the TCUs are rooted in indigenous ways of knowing and our support of arts programming helps TCUs fulfill that mission. We believe access to indigenous art is one of our inherent rights, as that access helps build community wellbeing and strengthens tribal identities. We are excited to partner with our TCUs and foster their innovative approaches to the intergenerational transfer of art knowledge and skills.”

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance.

For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Olympian Ibtihaj Muhammad and California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls Executive Director LaKenya Jordan Discuss Equity, Resilience, & Breaking Barriers at the #CASTEAM20

California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls Executive Director LaKenya Jordan will lead a fireside chat with Ibtihaj Muhammed, kicking off the California STEAM Symposium on December 11, 2020!

The Commission seeks to empower and uplift California’s women and girls with inspiring conversations with phenomenal women such as Ibtihaj Muhammed. As an entrepreneur, activist, New York Times best-selling author, and speaker, Ibtihaj Muhammad is a 2016 Olympic bronze medalist, 5-time Senior World medalist and World Champion, and the first American woman to compete in the Olympics in hijab. In September of 2019, Ibtihaj released her first children’s book The Proudest Blue: A Story of Hijab and Family, which instantly became a New York Times Best Seller.

Ibtihaj Muhammad is a sports ambassador with the U.S. Department of State’s Empowering Women and Girls through Sport Initiative and was nominated by President Obama as a member of the President’s Council on Fitness, Health & Nutrition. She works closely with organizations like Athletes for Impact, the Special Olympics, and Laureus Sport for Good. Named to Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential list, Ibtihaj is an important figure in a larger global discussion on equality and the importance of sport. Her voice continues to unite both the sports and non-sports world.

As Executive Director of the California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls, her work is centered on working with the 17 appointed Commissioners to advance greater equality for women and girls inclusive of race and gender equality, women’s rights. She believes in the uplift and empowerment of every woman and girl, knowing that California can lead the way in establishing a distinctive focus on equity, equality, and inspiration for future generations. The Commission’s work includes programs focused on advancing women’s equality, pay equity, women’s wellbeing, workplace rights, positive images of women and girls in the media, and increasing the number of girls engaged in Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math (S.T.E.A.M.).

The STEAM Symposium is one of the Commission’s favorite events of the year. “I am looking forward to the fireside chat with such a groundbreaking leader as Ibtihaj. The Commission’s work to uplift and inspire diverse women and girls is vital. Conversations with dynamic women leaders help create space in the world for women and girls from various backgrounds while inspiring future generations,” said Director Jordan. “We are thrilled to once again co-host the STEAM Symposium with the California Department of Education and the CDE Foundation. This event presents an opportunity to make significant positive change for girls in California as we continue to push open doors and break down barriers to their participation in STEAM fields around the globe. The Commission celebrates women whose determination to succeed helps them to overcome challenges and achieve their dreams. It is our hope that every girl in California and worldwide will be inspired to do the same.”

We look forward to collaborating with educators from around the world at the California STEAM Symposium to prepare for a wonderful launch into 2021. The California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls is thrilled to announce the opportunity to join this incredible conversation with an international inspiration.

Event Details:

California STEAM Symposium

December 11-13, 2020

Location: Any laptop or mobile device

Current registration rate is only $145!

Visit www.steamcalifornia.org for the full schedule, agenda, and registration.

The California STEAM Symposium is co-hosted by the California Department of Education, the California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls, and the Californians Dedicated to Education Foundation.

About the Commission

The Commission on the Status of Women and Girls works in a culturally inclusive manner to promote equality and justice for all women and girls by advocating on their behalf with the Governor, the Legislature and other public policymakers, and by educating the public in the areas of economic equity including educational equity, access to health care including reproductive choice, violence against women and other key issue areas identified by the Commission as significantly affecting women and girls.

To learn more, please visit: www.women.ca.gov


New Community Provides Catalyst for Change in Tech

24th November 2020 – London, United Kingdom

Advocate for women in business everywoman launches a new free-to-join global community to support women in tech at all levels.

According to research by PWC, 78% of students can’t name a famous female working in technology. Additionally, only 5% of leadership positions in the technology sector are held by women.

Today sees the launch of the everywoman in Tech Hub, a new open-to-all online destination to support career growth for women in technology roles. This new platform allows members to connect with peers and role models, find mentors, attend training and access critical career development content. The online portal offers a blend of social networking, online events and a content portal that will enable women working in technology roles to supercharge their careers and get peer support.

everywoman Co-Founder Maxine Benson MBE said, “With all that has happened this year it’s more important than ever for us to innovate and find new ways of connecting women and their allies. Building on our legacy of showcasing role models through our everywoman Tech Forum and Awards, the everywoman in Tech Hub serves to connect this incredible community of women year round. We’re delighted to create this place for women to get readily available support and help them take the next step in their career.”

Some of the key features of the hub include:

● Live webinars featuring leading figures in tech on leadership and technical topics ● Multimedia content from role models, giving vital clues on career development ● Direct connection with mentors, mentees or peers via a social networking platform that facilitates 1:1 connection and forum style group discussions.

Why is the hub needed?

In the current climate, forging meaningful connections between women working in technical roles is more important and, in many ways, more challenging than ever. It’s a top priority for the team at everywoman, so we’re building on our 21 year history of advancing women in business, with this online hub as a logical next step.

To access the everywoman in Tech Hub, visit – https://everywomanforum.com/tech-hub

About everywoman

Advancing women in business: every woman, everywhere.

everywoman is a global platform for advancing women in business. Working to close all gender opportunity gaps, so that women can equally engage in the business world. Founded in 1999 by Karen Gill MBE and Maxine Benson MBE, everywoman has supported thousands of women worldwide in establishing businesses and progressing their careers. Working with leading corporations and organisations – using diversity insights – it can demonstrate the improved productivity and performance achieved when women and men work together equally and respectfully. Through its cross-industry awards and forums everywoman has created thousands of female role models and male allies, inspiring generations of future leaders. To find out more visit www.everywoman.com.


US Organizations Receive Diversity Impact Awards at ERG Leadership Summit

Greensboro, NC (October, 2020)The Association of ERGs & Councils (a practice group of PRISM International, Inc. and Talent Dimensions) recognized the outstanding achievements of Employee Resource Groups, Diversity Councils and other DE&I initiatives at the Diversity Impact Awards™ ceremonies during the USC Marshall Center for Effective Organizations 2020 ERG Leadership Summit Week: A Virtual Event October 19 – October 24.

Each evening of the conference included award ceremonies honoring the Top 25 US Employee Resource Groups (ERGs), Top 10 Enterprise-Wide ERGs, Top 10 Diversity Action and Executive Sponsor of the Year Recognition Awards. “The virtual event didn’t dampen the spirit and excitement of the award winners as they celebrated the incredible accomplishments of their teams,” said Lynn Cowart, Principle and Chief Operations Officer at Talent Dimensions.

The Diversity Impact Awards™ was launched in 2020 and is the next iteration of the ERG & Council Honors Award™. The ERG & Council Honors Award™ was the first, and until recently, the only annual national award that recognized and honored the outstanding contributions and achievements of ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. It was established in 2008 by the Association of ERGs & Councils, a practice group of diversity and inclusion consulting and training firm, PRISM International, Inc.

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ were reimagined to leverage a data-driven and scientifically-validated model developed by Dr. Theresa M. Welbourne, Will and Maggie Brooke Professor in Entrepreneurship at the University of Alabama and CEO of eePulse, to ensure buy-in from key stakeholders and drive greater learning. The awards were segmented to create a level playing field for individual ERGs, enterprise-wide ERG programs and non-ERG Diversity initiatives. For the second year, we are honoring the important work of Executive Sponsors.

“While we were excited to launch the new Diversity Impact Awards after almost a year of research and gaining input, launching a new awards structure during COVID-19 was challenging to say the least. We considered taking a hiatus given what organizations were experiencing. We quickly realized that this work was far too important and the individuals volunteering countless hours to create organizations where ALL people felt engaged, included and that they belong, must be recognized,” said Cile Johnson, Principle and Chief Business Officer at Talent Dimensions.

Congratulations to all our Diversity Impact Award winners!

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ Top 25 ERG Award recipients:

  1. Blue Cross NC – GlobalNet
  2. Novant Health – Women’s Business Resource Group
  3. Northwestern Mutual – Asian Employee Resource Group
  4. Rockwell Automation – Cultures Connected
  5. Northwestern Mutual – Women’s Employee Resource Group
  6. ChristianaCare – Women’s Employee Network (WEN)
  7. Mount Sinai Health System – Heritage of Latino Alliance Employee Resource Group
  8. Northwestern Mutual – Hispanic Employee Resource Group
  9. Northwestern Mutual – Mutual disAbility Alliance
  10. NextEra Energy – African American Employee Professional Group
  11. Novant Health – Persons with Abilities Business Resource Group
  12. Novant Health – Black/African American Business Resource Group
  13. Southern California Edison – Latinos for Engagement, Advancement and Development (LEAD)
  14. Erie Insurance – Women’s Affinity Group
  15. Bank of America – LEAD for Women
  16. Northwestern Mutual – Military Veteran Employee Resource Group (MVERG)
  17. NextEra Energy – Women in Energy
  18. Novant Health – Pride Business Resource Group
  19. State Street – Professional Women’s Network Massachusetts Chapter (PWN-MA)
  20. Novant Health – Veterans’ Business Resource Group
  21. JetBlue – JetBlue African Diaspora Experience (JADE)
  22. Dominion Energy – We3
  23. American Airlines – Latin Diversity Network EBRG
  24. Halliburton – Women Sharing Excellence
  25. American Airlines – Professional Women in Aviation EBRG

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ Top 10 Enterprise-Wide ERG Award recipients:

  1. Bank of America – Bank of America Enterprise ERGs
  2. Northern Trust – Northern Trust Business Resource Council Advisory Council (BRCAC)
  3. Asurion – Asurion ERGs
  4. Cigna – Power of Connections Wellness Circles
  5. Southern Company Gas – 2019 ERG Program Expansion/Evolution
  6. Banner Health – Team Member Resource Group (TMRGs) Launch
  7. University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center – Diversity Council and Employee Networks
  8. Perdue Farms, Inc. – “Day of Understanding”
  9. Tennessee Valley Authority – TVA ERG Collaboration
  10. American Airlines – Abraham’s Tent – Christian, Jewish and Muslim EBRGs

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards Top 10 Diversity Action Award recipients:

  1. Mount Sinai Beth Israel – Go Red Event
  2. Portsmouth Naval Shipyard
  3. Froedtert Health – Disability Etiquette
  4. Ricoh – International Women’s Day
  5. Halliburton – Focus on Family
  6. NASCAR – Heritage History Series
  7. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana – Strategic Plan
  8. Novant Health – Health Equity Council
  9. American Airlines – Virtual Inclusion Week
  10. Novant Health – Cross Cultural Communications Program

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards Executive Sponsor of the Year recipients in alphabetical order:

  • Dominion Energy – Wendy Wellener, Vice President – Shared Services
  • NextEra Energy, Inc. – Kate Stengle, Vice President Internal Audit
  • Northern Trust – Shundrawn Thomas, President of Northern Trust Asset Management (NTAM)
  • Novant Health – Chere Gregory, MD, SVP Chief Health Equity Officer Diversity & Inclusion

About the Diversity Impact Awards™
The Diversity Impact Awards™ program was launched in 2020 and is the next iteration of the ERG & Council Honors Award™. The ERG & Council Honors Award™ was the first, and until recently, the only annual national award that recognized and honored the outstanding contributions and achievements of ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. The new award process leverages a data-driven and scientifically validated model to create collective learning within and across organizations. The honor award was established in 2008 by the Association of ERGs & Councils, a practice group of diversity and inclusion consulting and training firm, PRISM International, Inc.

About the ERG & Council Conference™
ERGs and Diversity Councils are vital links for improving organizational results. However, to remain impactful and effective, they need opportunities to increase their skills and knowledge and to learn and share best practices. They need opportunities to network, celebrate and grow. This was the purpose of the first annual conference designed specifically for ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. Learn more by visiting http://www.ergcouncilconference.com.

About the Association of ERGs & Councils
The Association of ERGs & Councils is a practice group of PRISM International, Inc. and Talent Dimensions and the premier resource for transforming Employee Resource Groups, Diversity Councils and Employee Network Groups to impact key organizational and business objectives. Learn more by visiting www.ergcouncil.com.

About PRISM International, Inc.
PRISM, a Talent Dimensions company, is a full-service provider of innovative and proven consulting, training and products for leveraging diversity and inclusion, addressing unconscious bias, increasing cross-cultural competencies and creating more effective ERGs and Diversity Councils. Learn more by visiting www.prismdiversity.com.


Register now for the 2020 AISES National Conference. This year is an all-virtual event.

All you have to do is register and voila! You’ll have great content at your fingertips for three fun-filled days. Be sure to visit the booths in our Exhibit Hall and chat with booth reps. Registration closes October 5.

Wes Studi is the 2020 AISES National Conference Keynote Speaker.

Cherokee actor, artist and musician Wes Studi, the first Native American actor to receive an Oscar, will be the keynote speaker at the all virtual 2020 AISES National Conference on October 15-17, 2020.

Wes will share his experiences on the role of purpose, resiliency and increasing the visibility of Native representation and peoples in the communities that surround us, locally and internationally.

Registration for the 2020 AISES National Conference is open until October 5. Learn more at conference.aises.org


US Organizations to Receive Diversity Impact Awards at October Conference

The Association of ERGs & Councils (a practice group of PRISM International, Inc. and Talent Dimensions) released their annual list of the Top 25 US Employee Resource Groups (ERGs), Top 10 Enterprise-Wide ERGs, Top 10 Diversity Action and Executive Sponsor Recognition Awards.  These groups will be recognized at an award ceremony during the USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective Organizations 2020 ERG Leadership Summit Week: A Virtual Event October 19 – October 24, 2020.

The Diversity Impact Awards™ was launched in 2020 and is the next iteration of the ERG & Council Honors Award™.  The ERG & Council Honors Award™ was the first, and until recently, the only annual national award that recognized and honored the outstanding contributions and achievements of ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. It was established in 2008 by the Association of ERGs & Councils, a practice group of diversity and inclusion consulting and training firm PRISM International, Inc.

In 2018, PRISM International was acquired by Talent Dimensions to help organizations weave Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DE&I) into the fabric of its culture.  “This can only happen if the organization develops a DE&I strategy aligned to the business strategy and the appropriate structure exists to ensure successful implementation.  Diversity Councils and ERGs (BRGs, Affinity Groups, Networks, etc.) serve as one of the most important levers to drive the tactical execution of that strategy,” shares Lynn Cowart, Principle and Chief Operations Office at Talent Dimensions.

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ were reimagined to leverage a data driven and scientifically validated model developed by Dr. Theresa Welbourne, Senior Affiliate Research Scientist at the USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective Organizations, Will and Maggie Brooke Professor in Entrepreneurship at the University of Alabama, and CEO of eePulse, to ensure buy-in from key stakeholders and drive greater learning.  The awards were segmented to create a level playing field for individual ERGs, enterprise-wide ERG programs and non-ERG Diversity initiatives.  For the second year, we are honoring the important work of Executive Sponsors.

“While we were excited to launch the new Diversity Impact Awards after almost a year of research and gaining input, launching a new awards structure during COVID-19 was challenging to say the least.  We considered taking a hiatus given what organizations were experiencing.  We quickly realized that this work was far too important and the individuals volunteering countless hours to create organizations where ALL people felt engaged, included and that they belong, must be recognized,” said Cile Johnson, Principle and Chief Business Officer at Talent Dimensions. “Our partnership with the USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective Organizations further supported the importance of the recognition of leaders and organizations.”

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards recipient rankings will be revealed at USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective (CEO) Organizations ERG Leadership Summit Week October 19 – October 24.

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ Top 25 ERG Award recipients in alphabetical order include:

  • American Airlines – Professional Women in Aviation EBRG
  • American Airlines – Latin Diversity Network EBRG
  • Bank of America – LEAD for Women
  • Blue Cross NC – GlobalNet
  • ChristianaCare – Women’s Employee Network (WEN)
  • Dominion Energy – We3
  • Erie Insurance – Women’s Affinity Group
  • Halliburton – Women Sharing Excellence
  • JetBlue – JetBlue African Diaspora Experience (JADE)
  • Mount Sinai Health System – Heritage of Latino Alliance Employee Resource Group
  • NextEra Energy – African American Employee Professional Group
  • NextEra Energy – Women in Energy
  • Northwestern Mutual – Asian Employee Resource Group
  • Northwestern Mutual – Women’s Employee Resource Group
  • Northwestern Mutual – Hispanic Employee Resource Group
  • Northwestern Mutual – Mutual disAbility Alliance
  • Northwestern Mutual – Military Veteran Employee Resource Group (MVERG)
  • Novant Health – Women’s Business Resource Group
  • Novant Health – Persons with Abilities Busines Resource Group
  • Novant Health – Black/African American Business Resource Group
  • Novant Health – Pride Business Resource Group
  • Novant Health – Veterans’ Business Resource Group
  • Rockwell Automation – Cultures Connected
  • Southern California Edison, Latinos for Engagement Advancement and Development (LEAD)
  • State Street – Professional Women’s Network Massachusetts Chapter (PWN-MA)

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ Top 10 Enterprise-Wide ERG Award recipients in alphabetical order include:

  • American Airlines – Abraham’s Tent – Christian, Jewish, and Muslim EBRGs
  • Asurion – Asurion ERGs
  • Bank of America – Bank of America Enterprise ERGs
  • Banner Health – Team Member Resource Group (TMRGs) Launch
  • Cigna – Employee Resource Groups
  • Northern Trust – Northern Trust Business Resource Council Advisory Council (BRCAC)
  • Perdue Farms, Inc. – “Day of Understanding”
  • Southern Company Gas – 2019 ERG Program Expansion/Evolution
  • Tennessee Valley Authority – TVA ERG Collaboration
  • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center – Diversity Council and Employee Networks

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards Top 10 Diversity Action Award recipients in alphabetical order include:

  • American Airlines – Virtual Inclusion Week
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana – Strategic Plan
  • Froedtert Health – Disability Etiquette
  • Halliburton – Focus on Family
  • Mount Sinai Beth Israel – Go Red Event
  • NASCAR – Heritage History Series
  • Novant Health – Health Equity Council
  • Novant Health – Cross Cultural Communications Program
  • Portsmouth Naval Shipyard – Disability Etiquette: Perspective Changing
  • Ricoh – International Women’s Day

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards Executive Sponsor of the Year recipients in alphabetical order:

  • Dominion Energy – Wendy Wellener, Vice President – Shared Services
  • NextEra Energy, Inc. – Kate Stengle, Vice President Internal Audit
  • Northern Trust – Shundrawn Thomas, President of Northern Trust Asset Management (NTAM)
  • Novant Health – Chere Gregory, MD, SVP Chief Health Equity Officer Diversity & Inclusion

About the Diversity Impact Awards™
The Diversity Impact Awards™ program was launched in 2020 and is the next iteration of the ERG & Council Honors Award™.  The ERG & Council Honors Award™ was the first, and until recently, the only annual national award that recognized and honored the outstanding contributions and achievements of ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils.  The new award process leverages a data driven and scientifically validated model to create collective learning within and across organizations.  The honor award was established in 2008 by the Association of ERGs & Councils, a practice group of diversity and inclusion consulting and training firm PRISM International, Inc.

About the ERG & Council Conference™
ERGs and Diversity Councils are vital links for improving organizational results. However, to remain impactful and effective, they need opportunities to increase their skills and knowledge and to learn and share best practices. They need opportunities to network, celebrate and grow. This was the purpose of the first annual conference designed specifically for ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. Learn more by visiting http://www.ergcouncilconference.com.

About the Association of ERGs & Councils
The Association of ERGs & Councils is a practice group of PRISM International, Inc. and the premier resource for transforming Employee Resource Groups, Diversity Councils and Employee Network Groups to impact key organizational and business objectives. Learn more by visiting www.ergcouncil.com.

About PRISM International, Inc.
PRISM, a Talent Dimensions company, is a full-service provider of innovative and proven consulting, training and products for leveraging diversity and inclusion, addressing unconscious bias, increasing cross-cultural competencies and creating more effective ERGs and Diversity Councils. Learn more by visiting www.prismdiversity.com.

About USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective Organizations
Since its founding over 40 years ago, the Center for Effective Organizations (CEO), a research center in the USC Marshall School of Business, is world-renowned for its breakthrough research and insights on organizational performance, effectiveness and talent management. Today, CEO is at the forefront, discovering and creating the latest knowledge in the design and management of organizations for companies that range from mid-sized to the Global 500. CEO’s worldwide network includes research scientists, faculty experts, best-selling authors, and corporate partners. Working together, they provide forward-thinking leaders with trusted insights and the hands-on learning they need to help them solve complex problems and build highly effective, sustainable organizations.


HACU’s virtual Town Hall to focus on the 2020 Presidential Election: Its Impact on Latinos and Hispanic Higher Education, Oct. 28

The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities will present a Town Hall on “The 2020 Presidential Election: Its Impact on Latinos and Hispanic Higher Education,” Oct. 28, 2020, 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. PT /4:30 – 5:30 p.m. CT /5:30 – 6:30 p.m. ET. The Town Hall is part of its 34th Annual Conference, being offered virtually under the theme, “Championing Hispanic Higher Education: Fostering Excellence and Social Justice,” Oct. 26-28.

The Town Hall will feature a panel of experts who will discuss the 2020 presidential election, and where each candidate stands on key issues, particularly education, and how their policies would impact Latinos in the U.S. The panelists will also analyze the decisions made by the elected candidates regarding elementary, secondary, and higher education and their impact on Hispanic-Serving Institutions, specifically, and the nearly 20 million college students enrolled in higher education nationwide.

The Town Hall will be moderated by Adela de la Torre, Ph.D., president, San Diego State University. Speakers will include: Sonja Diaz, Esq., executive director, University of California Los Angeles, Latino Policy & Politics Initiative; Ted Mitchell, Ph.D., president, American Council on Education; and Mark Hugo Lopez, Ph.D., director, Global Migration and Demography Research, Pew Research Center.

HACU’s premier conference on Hispanic higher education provides a unique forum for the sharing of information and ideas for the best and most promising practices in the education of Hispanics and promotes and expands partnerships and strategic alliances for collaboration between HACU-member institutions and public- and private-sector organizations.

Registration for HACU’s 34th Annual Conference and pre- and post-conference events is available here.


American Indian College Fund Announces 2020-21 Student Ambassador Cohort

The American Indian College Fund selected and trained 12 new student ambassadors for its 2020 cohort. Now in its sixth year, the College Fund Student Ambassador Program trains American Indian and Alaska Native students to serve as leaders in their communities, to work to combat stereotypes, and to create greater visibility of Native Americans and an understanding of the importance of their diverse cultures.

With 42% of the Native American population today under the age of 24, the opportunity to educate the next generation of young Native leaders to realize their potential and to advocate for their communities is at a tipping point. Creating greater visibility about the importance of higher education for Native students is crucial to creating a better future for Native peoples and communities. College Fund student ambassadors promote higher education and visibility of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN) and inspiring the next generation of Native students in media interviews, at cultural events, in their communities, and on their campuses.

The 2020 cohort also received advocacy training to help them spearhead engagement and action for issues impacting Native communities.

This year the multi-day training program was moved online, still providing student ambassadors with leadership development, public speaking, interviewing, writing, and social media training in an interactive modular format.

The virtual format allowed attendees the additional opportunity to participate in conversations about career planning and persistence with professionals in their fields. Special guests included veteran Native American actor Zahn McClarnon (recent credits include television shows Barkskins, Longmire, Fargo, and Westworld and the movie Dr. Sleep) who was joined by his mother, a longtime professional educator; and Kevin McDermott, a retired NFL long snapper who played for the San Francisco 49ers, Denver Broncos, Baltimore Ravens, and Minnesota Vikings before leaving the NFL to launch his dream career in finance.

The 2020-21 American Indian College Fund Student Ambassadors are:

  • Lyndsey Blanco (Tlingit and Haida Central Council), a business administration major at Ilisagvik College in Alaska;
  • Kimberly Blevins (Mandan Hidatsa Arikara Nation), an environmental science master’s program student at Sitting Bull College in North Dakota;
  • Natasha Goldtooth (Diné), an agroecology/environmental science major at Diné College in Arizona;
  • Spring Grey Bear (Standing Rock Sioux Tribe), a business administration major at United Tribes Technical College in North Dakota;
  • Kenwa Kravitz (Pit River/Wintu), a native studies leadership major at Northwest Indian College in Washington;
  • Emily Lockling (Fond du Lac Band of Superior Chippewa), an environmental science major at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College in Minnesota;
  • Jacob McArthur (White Earth Ojibwe Nation), a business administration major at Bemidji State University in Minnesota;
  • Tori McConnell (Yurok Tribe), a neurology, physiology, and behavior major at the University of California Davis in California;
  • Jamison Nessman (White Earth Nation), a pre-medicine student at Bemidji State University in Minnesota;
  • Chandra Norton (Hoopa Vakkey Tribe), a community advocate and responsive education in human services major at Northwest Indian College in Washington;
  • David Plant (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes), a business management major at Salish Kootenai College in Montana.
  • Amanda Ruiz (Sicangu Lakota), a natural science degree and pre-engineering major at Oglala Lakota College in South Dakota;
  • Christopher Villaruel (Ajumawi/Pit River), a Forestry Hydrology Major at Humbodlt State University in California;
  • Lester Wells (Crow Creek Sioux Tribe), a Lakota leadership and management master’s program major with an education administration emphasis at Oglala Lakota College in South Dakota; and
  • Jade Yazzie (Diné), a food and nutrition in dietetics major at Montana State University in Montana.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Keynote Lineup for VIRTUAL Commercial UAV Expo Americas 2020 includes Leaders from FAA, CISA and The White house

Steve Dickson, Administrator, FAA; Brian Harrell, Assistant Director, DHS Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA); and Michael Kratsios, Chief Technology Officer of the United States, The White House, will deliver keynote presentations at Commercial UAV Expo Americas 2020 Virtual Event taking place September 15-17.  Additional keynote panels are Drone Delivery in the Era of a Pandemic; UPS Panel on Building a Drone Delivery Airline While Balancing the Gender Equation; and Expanded Operations, Regulatory Update and Lessons Learned from IPP.

For the first time, Keynotes will be free to attend for anyone with Virtual Exhibit Hall pass. In addition to accessing the keynotes, attendees will be able to chat with one another during the sessions and network with one another through a sophisticated AI-powered networking tool. Registration is available here: https://virtual.expouav.com/page/1554247/register?promo=209221

“The need to come together has never been greater,” said Lisa Murray, Event Director. “We’re thrilled that these top UAS leaders have chosen Commercial UAV Expo as the platform for sharing critical updates and information during these extraordinary times.”

Keynote Presentations

Steve Dickson, FAA
UAS Today and Onward

Over the past year, the industry and the FAA have made substantial progress related to UAS. Operators have received part 135 air carrier certification, the long-awaited remote identification rule was proposed and will soon be finalized, aircraft type certification efforts are underway, and emergency relief and public safety operations have expanded. But where is the FAA really on the path to full integration? This journey began and is progressing deliberately, with an absolute commitment to safety every step of the way. As technology has advanced; experience has been gained through real-world operations, such as those conducted under the UAS Integration Pilot Program. Regulatory efforts have progressed bringing the destination closer every day. In this keynote address, FAA Administrator Steve Dickson will discuss the state of UAS, today and in the future.

Brian Harrell, CISA
Security Threats & Opportunities; DHS CISA Resources for Commercial Enterprises

“Private industry does not own the airspace above generation facilities, above a transmission substation, above a water plant — so the overhead threat for attack is absolutely real today.”—Brian Harrell. In his Keynote address, Brian will provide an update on joint efforts of DHS, DOJ, HHS and other agencies to anticipate and mitigate threats, the risks posed by—and opportunities for use of – unmanned systems, the importance of investing in an insider-threat and other crisis mitigation programs, and resources available for industry including free workshops, training and webinars through the DHS CISA. The goal is protecting key infrastructure and other assets including the electric grid and water resources and preparing for worst-case scenarios.

Michael Kratsios, The White House
Update from the White House

As President Trump’s top technology advisor, Michael has led the development and execution of the Administration’s national technology policy agenda since inauguration. Under his leadership, the White House launched National initiatives for artificial intelligence, quantum computing, 5G and broadband communications, autonomous vehicles, commercial drones, STEM education, and advanced manufacturing. Chief Michael will provide an update on the latest developments from the White House.

Keynote Panels

In addition to the Keynote Presentations, the program includes three Keynote panels:

Drone Delivery in the Era of a Pandemic

The successes of drones deliveries for sending medicine and organs to hospitals quickly, or delivering aid in disaster areas, has not only been a step forward for proof of concept, but the PR engendered has been an important boost for the drone industry. How have deliveries been progressing, particularly throughout the pandemic, and what are next steps toward expanding these programs for other types of package delivery via drone?

Panelists include Lisa Ellman, Commercial Drone Alliance & Partner, Hogan Lovells, (Moderator); Bala Ganesh, UPS; Ed De Reyes, Sabrewing Aircraft Company, Inc with additional speaker announcements to come.

Building a Drone Delivery Airline While Balancing the Gender Equation

The UPS Flight Forward team is comprised of women leaders. In this inspiring Keynote they’ll share not only the new technologies being deployed and integration into the existing UPS airline fleet, but also their experiences as they’ve been actively balancing the gender equation. Speaker announcements coming soon.

Expanded Operations, Regulatory Update and Lessons Learned from IPP

Jay Merkle will kick off the session with a regulatory update and will then engage panelists in candid discussion about their IPP experiences. He’ll focus on how these learnings and insights will inform the expansion of drone programs.

Panelists include Jay Merkle, FAA (Moderator); Katelyn McCauley, San Diego IPP; Cathy Cahill, University of Alaska IPP; Mark Blanks, Virginia IPP; James Grimsley, Advanced Technology Initiatives, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma.

About Commercial UAV Expo Americas

Commercial UAV Expo Americas, presented by Commercial UAV News, is the leading international trade show and conference for the commercial drone market. Its sixth edition, September 15-17, 2020 will take place virtually. For more information, visit www.expouav.com/.

Commercial UAV Expo Americas and its sister event Commercial UAV Expo Europe are produced by Diversified Communications’ technology portfolio which also includes Commercial UAV News, GeoBusiness Show, International Lidar Technology Forum, SPAR 3D Expo & Conference, SPAR 3D.com, AECNext Technology Expo & Conference and AEC Next News. For information on opportunities for vendors at Commercial UAV Expo Americas, contact Katherine Dow, Sales Manager, at kdow@divcom.com or +1.207-842-5497. For attending information, visit www.expouav.com or email info@expouav.com.

Trans and non-binary people in STEM: Apply for a Ben Barres Fellowship, deadline 9/30/2020

NOGLSTP is proud to offer the Ben Barres Fellowship. The fellowship is a $2000-$5000 award for professional development of trans, intersex, and non-binary graduate students and post-doctoral fellows in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

The Ben Barres Fellowship is a merit-based award, and the support provided is intended, broadly construed, for the recipient’s professional development. Examples of eligible purposes include research support; conference/workshop attendance, or research travel; equipment/supplies; research assistant or translation services; and/or other professional uses. The fund is not intended to support personal expenses unrelated to research, such as food or rent.

To apply for The Ben Barres Fellowship, applicants will provide a brief description of their current research and research/career goals, a 2-3 paragraph funding proposal, a personal statement, their CV, and answers to demographics questions. Each application must have one letter of support, which may be written by any of the following: PI, Mentor, Advisor, or Colleague. The letter of support will be submitted by the recommender (not the applicant). Applications will be evaluated on clarity of written proposal, impact of proposed funding on applicant’s career, contributions to STEM and LGBTQ+ communities, and strength of support letter. If awarded funds, the recipient will upload a brief report and expense receipts within 6 months of receiving the award.

Apply here: https://www.noglstp.org/programs-projects/ben-barres-fellowship/

Recipients of the fellowship will retain the option of remaining anonymous in public announcements of the award. Alternatively, they may choose to be publicly acknowledged in NOGLSTP’s publicity campaigns. Awards will range from $2000 to $5000 per recipient. Application deadline for the first round of awards is September 30,2020. Award decisions will be announced the first week of December. If any money is left, there will be additional rounds of awards until all the money has been awarded.

About NOGLSTP

NOGLSTP was established in 1980, incorporated in the State of California in 1991, and was granted IRS 501 (c) 3 non-profit status in 1992. NOGLSTP’s mission is to educate the scientific and general communities about the presence and accomplishments of LGBT individuals in STEM professions. NOGLSTP presents educational symposia and workshops nationwide. NOGLSTP fosters dialog with other professional societies, academia, and industry to facilitate diversity and inclusion in the workplace. NOGLSTP is an affiliate of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, is a participating professional society member of MentorNet®, a sustaining member of the National Postdoctoral Association, a partner with the Higher Education Recruitment Consortium (HERC) and a founding member of the E-Week Diversity Council.

For more information, visit the website at www.noglstp.org


Cheryl Crazy Bull, President of American Indian College Fund, Receives Legacy Award from Working Mother Media

Denver, Colo.—July 30, 2020– Working Mother Media presented Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund President, with its Legacy Award on Wednesday, July 22, during its Multicultural Women’s Conference, which was hosted virtually due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Working Mother Media established the Legacy Award in 2005 to honor one extraordinary individual for her inspiration, dedication, and contributions to the advancement of multicultural women in the workplace and beyond. In particular, the organization honors women from public and non-profit sectors for their outstanding work that creates opportunity and well-being on many levels for women, girls, and communities. Cheryl Crazy Bull was selected for the award because of her extensive experience with the tribal college movement and her tireless work in supporting Native student success and education. Her long history of education, activism, and community growth has been documented and exemplary, and has created a lasting legacy built on advancing Native voices that will continue far into the future.

Subha V. Barry, President, Working Mother Media, said, “This award acknowledges the incredible and courageous women who are out there in the field doing the hard work and making a difference, being mentors, leaders and examples to others—and who are creating a legacy and vision for future women.”

Cheryl_Crazy_BullCheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “Receiving this award is an honor that goes beyond me. It is an award that I accept on behalf of all indigenous women who want to be seen, those who have gone into the spirit world who we must remember, those who are here now and need our support, and those who are coming who need our seventh generation vision. Many of our Tribal nations survived because women adapted to the new world, kept our traditions alive, and passed our knowledge to our children. I want to recognize my colleagues at the American Indian College Fund, and especially to honor the women of the tribal college movement today, the women who helped found our tribal colleges and universities and who served and serve as presidents and as faculty and staff, the women who are our students.”

According to the Working Mother Research Institute’s “On the Verge” study, 50% of multicultural working women considered leaving their companies within a year. On top of bias and lack of support, multicultural women are also disproportionately impacted socio-economically, and struggle with building strategic relationship capital that would elevate their careers. During the pandemic, multicultural women are faced with even greater challenges than before.

The Multicultural Women’s Conference gives working women the tools needed to lead effectively in trying times. While studies show that women of color bring higher levels of education, ambition, and diverse ideas to the workplace, the conference tasked organizations and individuals to explore ways to ensure talented multicultural women stay engaged and connected while being inclusive and helping them to build networks, new skills, and cultural leadership competencies in today’s environment.

About Working Mother Media— Working Mother Media’s (WMM) mission is to serve as a champion of culture change. WMM publishes Working Mother magazine and its companion website, workingmother.com, which is the only national magazine for career-committed mothers. WMM also produces 20-plus events dedicated to the advancement of women, work and life, and helping organizations build inclusive workplace cultures.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

Photo: Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO, American Indian College Fund


American Indian College Fund Awarded $50,000 Rise Prize

The American Indian College Fund was awarded a $50,000 Rise Prize to create both a higher education cohort of Native student mothers and programming that is responsive to their unique needs as college students. The program will be called Ina Wa Wounspe Pi,” Lakota for Mothers Who Are Learning.

The “Rise Prize” is a collective effort between Imaginative Futures, the Lumina Foundation and ten partner organizations focused on the success of parent students in higher education. Organizations based in the United States of any age, size, or type that are currently working on direct impact initiatives for student parents and other students, including high education institutions, for-profit companies, and non-profit organizations like the American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) were eligible to apply for the competitive prize.

The College Fund was one of eight of 383 applicants that was chosen to receive $50,000 for their efforts programming efforts in working with student parents.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “On behalf of the College Fund, I appreciate the opportunity through the Rise Prize to focus resources on supporting student mothers. While all parents and guardians are valued by us, we welcome resources to help mothers pursue their educational dreams. They inspire us and with coaching and programs directed at their success, we look forward to their bright futures.”

With the Rise Prize, the American Indian College Fund will be collecting data on the cohort’s outcomes to examine other cohorts that can be created to meet student coaching needs.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

 

American Indian College Fund Statement: Re-Name Mascots to End Harmful Stereotypes

#TheTimeIsNow for racist sports team names and mascots to be renamed. The American Indian College Fund appreciates its long-time mission supporters, FedEx, Nike, and Walmart. They have chosen to stand alongside indigenous groups across the United States to amplify our voices and to call upon the Washington NFL team to change its name. We are proud to call you our allies.

Indigenous people are a vibrant part of both our nation’s history and modern-day America. Eliminating mascots that reinforce harmful stereotypes sends a powerful message to our children that we value all histories, cultures, and perspectives, helping to foster confidence, growth, and success from kindergarten to college graduation and to build a better future for all. #ChangeTheName. #NotYourMascot.

Cheryl_Crazy_BullCheryl Crazy Bull
President and CEO, American Indian College Fund

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


AT&T Contributes $350K to American Indian College Fund

Charity Offering Native Student Scholarships and College Readiness Programs to Increase Number of Native Americans With A Higher Education

Denver, Colo., June 30, 2020—COVID-19 had a more devastating impact on Native American communities than others. Because only 14% of American Indians and Alaska Natives have a college degree—less than half of that of other groups, the American Indian College Fund was understandably worried about the impact of the virus on students entering college for the first time in the fall and the persistence of those already in college. Thanks to the continued support of AT&T with a $350,000 contribution to the American Indian College Fund’s Braided Success: Fostering Native Student Success from High School to College and Career program, high school and college students in the Tohono O’odham Community College in Sells, Arizona and College of Muscogee Nation in Okmulgee, Oklahoma communities continued and will continue to be supported in their quest for a higher education.

The American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) created two interlocking programs with the grant to increase Native student access to higher education and success.

Braiding Support will provide $100,000 in scholarship support over the period of one year to American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) students from Oklahoma and Arizona seeking to attend a tribal college (TCU) or mainstream institution located in their home states.

Braiding Success will develop partnerships between the Tohono O’oodham Community College (Sells, Ariz.) and the College of Muscogee Nation (Okmulgee, Okla.) and the local high schools serving their tribal communities, and employers.

In the first three years of the program, the College of Muscogee Nation partnered with three local high schools and offered three dual enrollment programs. Of the 157 Native high school student participants, 33% took college courses through the dual-enrollment program. Participants also enjoyed college visits.

Similarly, TOCC partnered with two local high schools to launch its S.T.A.R.T. program—Students Thriving, Achieving, and Rising Together. Thirty-eight percent of all partner high school students are served by S.T.A.R.T., and of that number, 42% of the students participated in the dual-enrollment program with TOCC. Students also enjoyed after-school programs and tutoring sessions.

The result was that students who participated in the TCU’s programs graduated from high school at rates more than 20% higher than Native Americans nationally.

By continuing the strong relationships forged between college the high schools and TCUs, the Braiding Success initiative also better prepares students who transition to college for an easier transition to higher education and employment.

Program managers at the TCUs are looking at ways to navigate the landscape with COVID-19, ensuring that students continue to have access to the program opportunities in a safe way to maintain the health of Native students and their communities. Program activities include college and career fairs, sponsored visits to employers to explore career opportunities with working professionals in students’ fields of interest and integrating coaching for student’s college and career success.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “AT&T is on the leading edge of engaging best practices supporting career pathways for indigenous students through its support of the College Fund’s student success programming. This partnership builds on our shared vision of helping students achieve their dreams.”

“AT&T has a long history of supporting initiatives that help Native American students graduate from high school and succeed in college and career,” said Tom Brooks, vice president of external affairs, AT&T. “We’re proud to further our commitment to Native communities with this contribution and connect Native youth to educational pathways that lead to careers in the 21st century workforce.”

About Philanthropy & Social Innovation at AT&T — AT&T Inc. is committed to advancing education, strengthening communities and improving lives. We have a long history of investing in projects that create learning opportunities, promote academic and economic achievement, and address community needs. Our AT&T Aspire initiative uses innovation in education to drive student success in school and beyond. With a financial commitment of $550 million since 2008, AT&T is leveraging technology, relationships and social innovation to help all students make their biggest dreams a reality.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $208 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


 

Henry Luce Foundation Grants $250,000 to American Indian College Fund to Assist Tribal College Faculty with Remote Instruction During Covid-19 Crisis

The Henry Luce Foundation granted the American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) $250,000 to provide faculty at tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) with the technology and support they need to make the transition to remote instruction during the Covid-19 crisis. TCUs are located on or near Indian reservations primarily in rural communities serving predominately Native American populations. It is not just Native students but entire Native communities, faculty included, that often lack the technological tools and resources to make the transition to on-line learning.

As the virus outbreak impacted Native communities, the American Indian College Fund was concerned that it has the potential to reverse education attainment. Yet now more than ever educated citizens are needed as health care workers, social workers, teachers, and more.

TCUs are geographically and culturally diverse that share common goals such as integrating cultural values and connection to land into curriculum and pedagogy while emphasizing community outreach and education rooted in tribal identity and practice. In 2017, over 11% of American Indian students studying at a U.S. two-or four-year public or private not-for-profit postsecondary institution attended one of the 35 accredited TCUs. Most TCUs operate much like community colleges while providing culturally and place-based higher education for Native American students and community members.

The link between a TCU education and community progress was shown in The Alumni of Tribal Colleges and Universities Better Their Communities survey report published in September 2019 by Gallup and the American Indian College Fund. The report was the result of a survey of 5,000 American Indian College Fund scholars about the value of an education rooted in Native American values. The results show that 74% of TCU graduates surveyed forged careers serving their communities and societies, TCU graduates (43%) say they are more than twice as likely as American Indian/Alaska Native graduates of non-TCUs (21%) and college graduates nationally (18%) to have had a professor that cared about them as a person and excited them about learning and a mentor that encouraged them, and reported nearly twice as much as graduates nationwide that they are thriving financially, socially, and in their communities and careers.

Thanks to the Henry Luce Foundation’s gift, the College Fund provided TCUs with direct technology and software support such as new laptops, computer upgrades, microphones, cameras, and Internet connectivity as well as support for online teaching, learning, and student engagement, including software, Learning Management System training, and assistance through an institutional online course delivery consultant. As the Covid19 situation continues, TCU faculty are now armed with the tools they need to ensure that their work continues uninterrupted.

“We’re pleased to support the College Fund’s efforts to help tribal colleges continue their critical education work during this very challenging time,” said Sean T. Buffington, Luce Foundation Vice President.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “We deeply appreciate the support of the Henry Luce Foundation in their unique commitment to TCU faculty. Our faculty are often tribal citizens and they are definitely all members of tribal communities, so they experience this crisis in the same ways as their students. The Foundation’s support is uplifting to TCU faculty and the students they educate.”

About The Henry Luce Foundation — The Henry Luce Foundation seeks to enrich public discourse by promoting innovative scholarship, cultivating new leaders, and fostering international understanding. The Foundation advances its mission through grantmaking and leadership programs in the fields of Asia, higher education, religion and theology, art, and public policy.

Established in 1936 by Henry R. Luce, the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Time, Inc., the Foundation’s earliest work honored his parents, missionary educators in China. The Foundation’s programs today reflect the value Mr. Luce placed on learning, leadership, and long-term commitment in philanthropy.

About the American Indian College Fund – Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


CHARTER LAUNCHES $100K SPECTRUM SCHOLARS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM WITH AMERICAN INDIAN COLLEGE FUND

Charter Communications, Inc. recently announced the creation of the Spectrum Scholars program with the American Indian College Fund, a two-year educational program for eligible rising Native American and Alaska Native juniors with financial need. This is part of a larger commitment Charter has made to four organizations.

Applications are now being accepted by the American Indian College Fund to select five students who will each be awarded a $20,000 college scholarship to be used over the course of their junior and senior years. Students selected as Spectrum Scholars will participate in a structured, two-year program focused on professional development. Beginning in the 2020-2021 academic year, students also will receive a Charter mentor and the opportunity to explore an internship at Charter, one of the nation’s largest broadband and connectivity companies.

Rhonda Crichlow, Senior Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer at Charter, said, “Charter is committed to making a lasting difference in the communities we serve. We are pleased to launch Spectrum Scholars, which will provide talented, underrepresented college students critical resources, mentoring and – importantly – access to opportunities. The launch of this program comes at a time when our communities need us most, and Charter is proud to play a critical role enabling students to continue their studies.”

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “On behalf of our students, I want to thank Charter for supporting students who have an interest in telecommunications and business by not only giving them financial support but encouraging the vital experience of mentoring. Our students appreciate being able to learn more about real world opportunities and mentoring is an excellent way to provide that learning.”
The addition of Spectrum Scholars continues the company’s deep commitment to its communities. And Spectrum Scholars’ goals to further develop the company’s workforce, especially during a difficult economy, fall within Charter’s overall mission of meeting the needs of the communities it serves.
More information on how to apply to become a Spectrum Scholar is available at collegefund.org/scholarships.

Charter Communications is committed to diversity and inclusion in all aspects of its business and strives to leverage the full diversity of its people and partners to make a meaningful difference for its customers, employees and communities. In addition to this commitment, Charter’s Community Impact team has developed several programs to improve local communities. In 2015, it launched its initial signature program, Spectrum Housing Assist, with the goal of improving 50,000 homes. To date, the company has reached more than 41,000 homes. In 2017, Charter expanded its philanthropic efforts by launching Spectrum Digital Education, which provides funding to local organizations helping to close the digital divide. Since the program’s inception, the company has committed $6 million in grants and in-kind support. In 2019, Spectrum Employee Community Grants was created to support employees’ volunteer work at local social and human services nonprofits. Last year, the company donated $250,000 to 140 organizations across 24 states for this program.

About Charter: Charter Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ:CHTR) is a leading broadband connectivity company and cable operator serving more than 29 million customers in 41 states through its Spectrum brand. Over an advanced communications network, the company offers a full range of state-of-the-art residential and business services including Spectrum Internet®, TV, Mobile and Voice.

For small and medium-sized companies, Spectrum Business® delivers the same suite of broadband products and services coupled with special features and applications to enhance productivity, while for larger businesses and government entities, Spectrum Enterprise provides highly customized, fiber-based solutions. Spectrum Reach® delivers tailored advertising and production for the modern media landscape. The company also distributes award-winning news coverage, sports and high-quality original programming to its customers through Spectrum Networks and Spectrum Originals. More information about Charter can be found at corporate.charter.com.

About the American Indian College Fund: Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance.

For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


News for NGLCC

NGLCC logo
HELPING THE LGBT BUSINESS COMMUNITY THROUGH THE COVID-19 CRISIS

In our recent email blast we shared that NGLCC will always continue to work for you and our communities. We ask all stakeholders to check NGLCC’s social media pages for updates on business development webinars and trainings; online matchmakers, both B2B and corporate; support with drafting capability statements and RFPs; and much, much more to help our businesses and community stay strong and ready for the year ahead.

We encourage all stakeholders to regularly check our landing page for Coronavirus relief and other essential updates: NGLCC Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). There you will find resources from the Small Business Administration, as well as NGLCC Corporate Partners, to assist small businesses with their recovery.

Additionally, many NGLCC local affiliate chambers have regional information an economic recovery opportunities available. To find your closest local affiliate, click here.

Special Resources:

1) NGLCC COVID-19 Resource Hub for the LGBT Business Community

2) LGBTBE Business Webinars And Video Resources During Covid-19

LGBTBE BUSINESS WEBINARS

AND VIDEO RESOURCES DURING COVID-19

nglcc

Questions? Webinars@nglcc.org

This page is dedicated to our network of exceptional, innovative Certified LGBT Business Enterprise® (Certified LGBTBE®) suppliers in the NGLCC network. Here you will find information on business development webinars and trainings; online matchmakers, both B2B and corporate; support with drafting capability statements and RFPs; and much, much more to help our businesses and community stay strong and ready for the year ahead.

For funding and economic relief information, please visit our hub: NGLCC Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Additionally, many NGLCC local affiliate chambers have regional information an economic recovery opportunities available. To find your closest local affiliate, click here.


Black Women in Science and Engineering (BWISE) partners with Cambio

BWISE and CAMBIO

The demand for workers in areas, like healthcare, supply chain and others has never been more critical than today. Two businesses are now joining forces to offer solutions to help organizations find top candidates while ensuring their talent pool is diverse.

Black Women in Science and Engineering (BWISE), founded by Erika Jefferson to support underrepresented women in STEM through networking, mentorship, and career development is partnering with Cambio, a multi-faceted recruiting and diversity platform founded by Neil Patwardhan and Bob Richards. Both organizations are focused on truly moving the needle on DEI hiring in meaningful way.

BWISE, with its professional job board and network of over 15,000 scientists, engineers and technologists, can focus on guidance to employers and diverse job seekers with a focus on black women in STEM. And Cambio, through its Diversity Engine and analytics, can spotlight diverse candidates and ensure biases are surfaced and focus on delivering top candidates.

BWISE is focused on bridging the leadership gap for Black women in STEM. It was founded with the purpose to support underrepresented women through networking, mentorship and career development. The group primarily consists of black women from middle management through senior leadership with degrees in the sciences, math and engineering (even if they no longer work in that field) who would like to connect with others. The organization provides a platform and a space to share career experiences and be empowered.

Cambio’s mission is to create a more human experience in the world of recruiting and job searching with video, and make the process more transparent and fun by embracing the swipe culture of viral mobile applications. A powerful part of our platform is the ability to surface under-represented qualified talent vs jobs through a sea of resumes through our engine to ensure recruiters get the right visibility. The company aims to speed up the hiring process and lead the way in diversity hiring to help companies meet their workforce goals for 2020 and beyond.

For additional information, news and updates on BWISE, visit bwiseusa.org or follow on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.

For additional information, news and updates on Cambio, visit cambiome.com or follow on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.


NMSDC – A Message From The President

Like everyone in the network, NMSDC’s national office is innovating every day to keep our mission and our work moving forward during the COVID-19 virus emergency.

Take a look at this new update from NMSDC President/CEO Adrienne C. Trimble about how the NMSDC is working in this environment – and how that is reshaping our plans for 2020.

NMSDC is mobilizing on the virtual level. Our national office and our regional affiliates are all operating remotely, in safety and security, but we are still conducting business as usual. We are here for you, as always.

We hope you are participating in our new, weekly virtual Town Halls – online every Thursday afternoon. Join us this week for our live stream on YouTube: How CPOs Are Responding: The Corporate Perspective on the COVID-19 Business Challenges.
Technology is allowing NMSDC to keep the conversation going between MBEs and corporate members, even as we are all isolated. Engagement so far in the Town Halls has been vigorous, thought-provoking, and helpful in these difficult days. Stay tuned to your email and social media for more information on these can’t-miss events.

Sadly, as you know, the health emergency has forced the postponement of Leadership Week and the Leadership Awards gala. We hope to reschedule or otherwise make the planned content and meetings available to you.

We are also monitoring developments to see how they might affect our “destination” events later in 2020 – notably, the Program Managers’ Seminar July 14-16 in Orlando, and the annual Conference and Business Opportunity Exchange October 25-28 in Phoenix.

We will keep you apprised of developments as they occur.

Staying in touch is vital during this crisis. Never has it been more important for all of us to remember that, even from a distance …
#WeAreNMSDC!


NUDC

National Utilities Diversity Council
This webinar will offer useful insights and ideas for BRG leaders and members, human resource professionals, business managers and both formal and informal executive sponsors.

APRIL

Tuesday, April 21, 2020 10am PDT/1pm EDT

Impact Analysis: Supplier Diversity Supporting Activities
How does data inform the impact of outreach activities to advance opportunities for diverse suppliers?

Jose Espinoza, CalWater
How do you prioritize activities? Why measure impact? What does impact look like? Join Jose Espinoza, as he reviews a data-driven program: the importance in measuring impact, top-five activities; he will share tips for supplier diversity managers, advocacy organizations, and diverse suppliers. He’ll conclude with how to implement a similar approach.

In addition to going beyond demonstrating diverse spend, this webinar will illustrate the importance of each step in the supplier diversity process including why it’s important to know where diverse suppliers are coming from, so you can identify barriers. More importantly, when you have current metrics on suppliers, those metrics can be used to encourage supplier diversity growth.

The webinars and the work of NUDC is made possible in part by grants from Academy Securities, ACT-1 Group, AG Tools, Alcoa Traffic Control, American Association of Blacks in Energy, American Water, Anonymous, Arnita Smith, Burns Environmental Services, Inc., C.L. King & Associates, California Water Association, Center for Energy Workforce Development, Conitsha Barnes, Connecticut Water, Consumers Energy, Damian Rivera, Diversity Comm, Donna Ruff, Dr. Alexander Washington, Duke Energy, Edison Electric Institute, Exelon Corporation, Gainesville Regional Utilities, Gunster, Heather McCreary, Hispanics in Energy, Jesse Castellanos, Liberty Power, Loop Capital, MFR Securities, Multicultural Media, Telecom and Internet Council, New York Power Authority, NRG Energy, Osceola Consulting, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Penserra, Philadelphia Gas Works, PJM Interconnection, PPL, Ruben Strategy Group, S&H Metal & Fabricating Co. Inc., Salesforce, Sanjay Kucheria/Trinus, Southern California Edison Company, Southern California Gas Company, Southwest Gas, SouthWest Water Company, TAS Strategies, TechSoup, The Dowling-Woo Company, The ELITE SDVOB Network, Utility Workers Union of America, Yolanda Pollard; Support for the Diversity Toolkit also received from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity; the Supplier Diversity webinar series is sponsored in part by generous support from Pacific Gas and Electric Company.

Wednesday, June 26, 2019 at 10am PDT/1pm EDT

Laurie Dowling, the executive director of the National Utilities Diversity Council is hosting a webinar on The Workforce Diversity Toolkit.

This will generate important new pathways for the utilities industry and the workers, companies, workforce providers, government agencies, and regulators who dedicate their efforts to strengthening energy work force opportunities for diverse communities.

To register, visit nudc.com .


Airport Restaurateurs, Retailers and Small/Minority Businesses Urge Airports and Congress to Provide Financial Relief Industry Experiencing Unprecedented Business Impact

AMAC and ARRA logos

WASHINGTON, DC (March 18, 2020) – The Airport Restaurant & Retail Association (ARRA) and Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) urged airports and Congress to quickly pass financial relief for airport restaurateurs and retailers given the unprecedented business impact caused by the spread of the Coronavirus and resultant COVID-19 pandemic.

Members of both organizations, which include restaurants, gift shops and retail stores, have been seriously impacted given the rapid decline in airline bookings and passenger counts which are falling at unprecedented rates. Further, several state and municipalities are closing restaurants, including at airports, to help contain the spread of COVID-19. All stakeholders in the industry—airlines, airports, airport retailers and restaurateurs, and other related companies—are financially suffering.

The associations represent a $10 billion industry made up of firms of varying sizes, including many small and local businesses which contribute $2.5 billion to airport revenue streams. Together these businesses employ more than 125,000 workers in U.S. airports. The restaurants and retail shops are a vital part of the airline passenger’s travel experience, and a major revenue source on which airports depend for their operations, development and bond financing.

John Clark, Chair of AMAC commented, “Our members are suffering tremendous sales losses exceeding 50% and in some cases as high as 90%. The industry is facing a major financial crisis. Many businesses, including those classified as small and/or disadvantaged, may not be able to continue operations.”

Restaurateurs and retailers in the aviation sector are contracted by airports, airlines and third-party developers to provide passengers a full range of food, beverage and retail services. Pat Murray, Chair of the ARRA explained, “our members’ ability to retain and pay employees, as well as pay rents to airports, has been seriously jeopardized. Some of our members will likely be unable to meet our debt obligations and will be forced out of business if quick action is not taken to provide relief.”

The two associations urged airports to engage with their members quickly and adopt mitigating actions to save the businesses:

• Waive rent, other fees and the imposition of penalties for at least six (6) months with the opportunity to extend depending on the extent and impact of the crisis.
• Suspend and defer concessionaires’ capital investment requirements.
• Provide operational flexibility including, but not limited to adjustments to operating hours, locations and menus/product selections as well as selective temporary closing of stores and restaurants in order to better align with passenger volumes and flows and reduce the impact on employees.

ARRA and AMAC strongly support the airports’ request for emergency financial assistance and flexibility to help sustain operations, preserve jobs and bonds, including assistance and flexibility for concessionaires during this critical time. ARRA and AMAC urged Congress and the Administration to also provide financial relief and assistance to airport concessionaires to ensure business continuity, secure loans and make debt service payments. Specific measures ARRA and AMAC urge Congress and the Administration to act upon are:

• Provide grants and low-interest or interest-free loans to concessionaires to allow concessionaires to cover operating expenses.
• Provide loan guarantees to concessionaires to assure their ability to continue making debt service payments and secure loans for their ongoing capital investment requirements.

About Airport Restaurant & Retail Association
The Association’s mission is to work collaboratively with aviation-industry trade associations and the airport community on matters of policy decision-making with a collective impact on restaurant/retail members. As members of the airport communities we serve, ARRA members have an expertise and understanding of best practices in the complex aviation restaurant and retail operational environment. Our knowledge can ultimately deliver powerful solutions of benefit to our airport partners.

About the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC)
The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is the only national, non-profit trade association dedicated to advance the full participation of minorities and women in employment and contracting opportunities throughout the aviation and aerospace industries. Since 1984, AMAC has been at the forefront of nearly every national policy initiative impacting the participation of disadvantaged businesses in airport contracting. AMAC works consistently with Congress, the Federal government, aviation trade associations and others as a resource for information, education and guidance on business and employment matters. For more information, visit amac-org.com.

 

Emerging Researchers National (ERN ) Conference 2020 Presentation Award Recipients

Air Force Civilian Service

Air Force Civilian Service

Danaher

Danaher

Alight

Alight Solutions

Leidos

Upcoming Events

  1. City Career Fair
    January 19, 2022 - November 4, 2022
  2. The Small Business Expo–Multiple Event Dates
    February 17, 2022 - December 1, 2022
  3. USPAACC’s CelebrASIAN Business + Procurement Conference 2022
    May 25, 2022 - May 27, 2022
  4. From Day One
    June 14, 2022
  5. NABA 2022 National Convention & Expo
    June 21, 2022 - June 24, 2022
  6. From Day One
    June 22, 2022

Upcoming Events

  1. City Career Fair
    January 19, 2022 - November 4, 2022
  2. The Small Business Expo–Multiple Event Dates
    February 17, 2022 - December 1, 2022
  3. USPAACC’s CelebrASIAN Business + Procurement Conference 2022
    May 25, 2022 - May 27, 2022
  4. From Day One
    June 14, 2022
  5. NABA 2022 National Convention & Expo
    June 21, 2022 - June 24, 2022
  6. From Day One
    June 22, 2022